Physical Wellness

Physical Wellness is the ability to maintain a healthy quality of life that allows us to get through our daily activities without undue fatigue or physical stress. The ability to recognize that our behaviors have a significant impact on our wellness and adopting healthful habits (routine checkups, balance diet, exercise, etc.) while avoiding destructive habits (tobacco, drugs, alcohol, etc.) will lead to optimal Physical Wellness.

Arboretum Poker Walk Challenge – Week Three

Week3

The arboretum trail kiosk in the area between the Environmental Sciences building, MAC Hall, and the Kress Events Center will have the challenge poster for the week of April 23rd to April 29th.  Check out the trail map at https://www.uwgb.edu/UWGBCMS/media/hr/Wellness%20Items/KioskMap.pdf.

Hopefully your outdoor exercise of shoveling snow is done and your back is feeling better, so now you can use this challenge as a reason to get back outside for some enjoyable exercise!  Take a picture of the poster at the kiosk, and email it to wellness@uwgb.edu to get your playing card for the week.  You can also stop by the HR or Kress front desk to pick a playing card.

More information about the Arboretum Poker Walk Challenge: https://blog.uwgb.edu/hr/2018/04/arboretum-poker-walk-challenge-2/

Parents – Keep in Shape!

Family Exercise

What’s a healthy habit that will make you, and if you have children, feel and look better? Exercise!

Being active can prevent medical problems such as heart disease and diabetes. So, try to exercise most days of the week. Most adults should aim for a total of two and a half hours of moderate physical activity a week. Kids need at least an hour a day.

Here are some activities you can do, with or without children to make exercise part of your daily routine today:

  • Listen to your favorite music and dance or jump rope to the beat.
  • Follow an exercise program on tele­vision daily.
  • Do household chores together to music. Sweep and mop the floor, vacuum the carpet, or wash the windows.
  • Count and see how long you and your child can stretch out and strengthen your muscles. Your child should not hold the stretch for more than 30 seconds.
  • Do sit-ups, pull-ups, push-ups, and jumping jacks. But be sure to warm your muscles up first with light activity or movement.
  • Walk at a fast pace up and down an apartment hallway.

Always make sure that a child won’t get hurt when you exercise. For example, remove throw rugs or other tripping hazards when you work out at home.

Start slowly and build up your activity level gradually. Choose exercises that will make you sweat and breathe hard. But don’t overdo it. You should be able to talk when you are exercising.

Remember to drink plenty of fluids before and after you exercise. And have fun keeping in shape!

Article from the StayWell Company, LLC

Arboretum Poker Walk Challenge – Week Two

ArbWeek2

The arboretum trail kiosk near the Residence Halls by East Circle Drive will have the challenge poster for the week of April 16th to April 22nd.  Check out the trail map at https://www.uwgb.edu/UWGBCMS/media/hr/Wellness%20Items/KioskMap.pdf.

So far, eleven people have ventured out on the snowy trails, taken a picture of the poster (example below), and emailed it to wellness@uwgb.edu to get their playing card for the week.  You can also stop by the HR or Kress front desk to pick a playing card.

More information about the Arboretum Poker Walk Challenge: https://blog.uwgb.edu/hr/2018/04/arboretum-poker-walk-challenge-2/

ArbPoster

Self-Defense Workshop Offered on April 23rd

Betsy1

  • “Amazing. Can it be a monthly series – 3 times a semester?”
  • “LOVED this so much!  Excellent, useful instructions!”
  • “They did a great job”
  • “It was really helpful and easy”
  • “This session was great – have it again if possible!”
  • “Great event!  I may even send my daughter to the youth course they offer.”
  • “Great job. Helped me feel comfortable to learn”

After the February Self-Defense Workshop, we sent out a survey to get feedback from attendees, and above are their responses.  Also, 100% responded that they would recommend this workshop to a co-worker!

As requested, Herb Blue’s Total Self Defense LLC will be back to present another Self-Defense Workshop to UW-Green Bay employees.  This is a beginner level workshop open to all employees, and there is no charge to employees to attend, thanks to a wellness grant from the Department of Employee Trust Funds (ETF)!

Date: Monday, April 23rd

Time: Noon to 1:00 p.m.

Location: University Union Room 103

RSVP: http://uwgreenbay.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_01AoaCoOZXbmxhz 

Each workshop is limited to 30 employees, so please RSVP soon to sign-up (first come, first serve).  Herb Blue’s Total Self Defense LLC will have each participant sign a waiver to participate in the workshop.  It is recommended that you wear comfortable clothing, but your work clothes are fine – no need to change for the workshop.

Please contact wellness@uwgb.edu or ext. 2203 with any questions.

Arboretum Poker Walk Challenge

Poster

Ready to get back on the trails?  Enjoy UW-Green Bay’s beautiful arboretum trails while participating in this fun wellness challenge for employees!  This five-week challenge will last from Monday, April 9th to Friday, May 11th, and each week, there will be a poster like the image above on a trail kiosk.  Simply take a photo of the poster (or a selfie with the poster!) with your phone when you are out on the trail, and then show your pic to the Kress Events Center front desk, the Human Resources front desk (CL 710), or email it to wellness@uwgb.edu to pick your playing card for that week.  We’ll keep track of the cards you pick, and then at the end of the five weeks, we’ll see who has the best poker hand!

Don’t have a camera on your phone but want to participate?  Please email wellness@uwgb.edu.

Where will the poster be each week?  Click on this link to see which trail to take to get to that week’s poster.

Questions? Please email us at wellness@uwgb.edu or call ext. 2203.

 

 

Improve Sleep Through Focused Breathing

Few things are worse than lying awake in bed, agonizing about the fact that you’re not already asleep. You watch the minutes tick by, calculating how many hours of sleep you won’t be getting because you can’t turn your brain off.

If this is you, we’ve got a tip for you to try tonight: Focus on your breathing while you’re lying in bed. One method, described by the National Sleep Foundation, is called “4-7-8” breathing. Here’s how it works:Alarm

  1. Exhale fully through your mouth, making a whooshing sound.
  2. Close your eyes and inhale through your nose while counting to four (in your head, of course).
  3. Hold your breath while counting to seven.
  4. Exhale through your mouth, making that whooshing sound again, while counting to eight.
  5. Repeat the sequence three more times.

This technique can help empty your mind of thoughts and focus on the rhythm of your breathing.

Article from the StayWell Company, LLC

Fuel Your Body Right

Still life of variety of Healthy Foods

If you’re feeling fatigued, think about what you’re eating. Food is essentially the fuel that runs your body. In simple terms, your body breaks the food you eat into molecules that release energy. The trick to reaching a healthy energy level and staying there is to eat foods that support energy production.

Carbohydrates are the primary source of foods that provide energy for your body. The trick is to choose “good” carbs and not “bad” carbs (white bread, white rice, doughnuts, and sugared sodas, for example).

Good carbs include:

  • High-fiber carbs. Fiber doesn’t supply energy, but it helps extend energy by slowing the body’s ability to break down and absorb sugar. This helps to level out energy highs and lows. High-fiber foods include 100 percent whole grains, nuts, seeds, berries, and leafy greens.
  • Low-glycemic carbs. These foods release energy slowly, giving your body a steady stream of it. They include legumes, rutabagas, asparagus, artichokes, pumpkin, broccoli, and onions. Since fiber slows your body’s breakdown and absorption of carbs, high-fiber foods are generally low on the glycemic index, too.

So next time you need more energy today, grab a good carb instead of a cup of coffee. See if that perks you up!

Article from the StayWell Company, LLC

Sleep better by eating this before bed

Try eating foods with tryptophan before bed for better sleep tonight.

You’ve likely heard that eating turkey makes people especially sleepy thanks to the sleep-inducing amino acid called tryptophan that it contains. Turns out there is science behind that tale. Some research shows that foods with tryptophan help your body product serotonin, which helps promote sleepiness. And there are foods with even more tryptophan than turkey. Try one or more of these tonight:

  • WalnutssleepLady
  • Pumpkin seeds
  • Soy foods
  • Shellfish
  • Eggs
  • Whole grains, like oatmeal
  • Dairy products

Carbohydrates help your brain use tryptophan. Proteins are the building blocks of tryptophan. So combinations of carbs and proteins can pack a bedtime punch. Try hummus on whole-grain crackers, cereal with milk, or peanut butter on whole-wheat bread.

Article from the StayWell Company, LLC

Why is mindfulness important?

Mindfulness

We all have stress in our lives.  Regardless of the cause, your body’s reaction to stress can make you more likely to get sick, so finding ways to de-stress is important to your health. Mindfulness can be the key to slowing down and enjoying the moment.

What can mindfulness do for me? 

  • lower stress levels
  • reduce blood pressure
  • help you sleep better
  • improve depression and anxiety symptoms
  • enjoy food more and maintain your weight
  • reduce fatigue and increase energy
  • improve your health
  • better brain function
  • sense of calm

Mindfulness involves paying deliberate attention to the present moment in a nonjudgmental way. By becoming more aware of the present, you can recognize anxious thoughts and free yourself from their grip. When we practice mindfulness at work, we think more clearly.  We respond rather than react.  We take events less personally.

How can I become more mindful?

  • Attend mindfulness sessions on campus led by an expert in this field (click here for details and to sign up to attend one, some, or all 5 sessions being held this spring)
  • Take the 21 day meditation challenge on the StayWell website (click on Programs > Well-Being Activities > 21 Day Meditation Experience)
  • Learn about meditation through videos, articles and quizzes on the StayWell website (click on Programs > The Best Possible You)

The latest research shows you can gain mindfulness benefits anytime by just stretching or taking deep breaths.  Once you learn these techniques, you can practice them on your own to continue reaping the benefits of mindfulness.

Article contents from the StayWell Company, LLC