Wellness

Teriyaki Chicken and Mango Salad

Marinade

  • 1/4 cup low-sodium soy sauce
  • 1/4 cup honey
  • 1 teaspoon garlic, finely choppedChicken-Mango-Salad-GI-365-4-1
  • 1 teaspoon fresh ginger, finely chopped
  • 1 teaspoon toasted sesame seeds

 

Salad

  • 1 boneless chicken breast
  • 3 ounces fresh shiitake mushrooms
  • 6 cups mixed baby lettuce greens
  • 2 mangoes, peeled, pitted, and cut into thin slices
  • 2 scallions, thinly sliced
  • 1/2 cup fat-free poppy-seed salad dressing

 

Directions

Combine marinade ingredients in a resealable plastic bag and shake to blend. Add chicken and turn to coat. Seal bag and refrigerate for several hours or overnight, turning the bag at least once. Remove chicken from marinade and place over moderately hot coals on a grill coated with cooking spray. Cook for 6 to 9 minutes, turning every 3 minutes or so, until brown on the outside and no longer pink inside. Remove from grill and allow to cool before cutting into thin slices. Remove and discard stems from mushrooms. Slice into thin slices. Lightly coat a medium-sized nonstick skillet with cooking spray and preheat over medium heat. Add mushrooms and cook for 1 to 2 minutes.

 

To serve, combine the chicken, mushrooms, greens, mango, and scallions in a salad bowl. Add the dressing and toss gently to coat.

Serves 4

Each serving contains approximately 303 calories, 3 g fat, 52 mg cholesterol, and 673 mg sodium.

Recipe from the StayWell Company, LLC

 

Relieving Eyestrain

You spend most of the day at work looking at a computer. At home, you check emails, pay bills, and read books all using your laptop, smartphone, or tablet. Sound familiar? All of this technology may have an unexpected side effect, called computer vision syndrome.

 

Computer vision syndrome is a group of symptoms involving vision problems and eye discomfort. Your eyes may feel sore, tired, and dry. You may also have blurry vision and headaches. The syndrome doesn’t cause permanent damage.

 

The cause? Electronic media has smaller type, bright backlighting, and lower contrast, eye doctors explain. We may also blink less often when looking at digital versus print media, research suggests. Surveys show that up to three-fourths of computer users experience eye discomfort.

 

Try these tips today to prevent eyestrain and relieve soreness:

  • Assess your setup. Move your monitor back so that you are about 25 inches away from the screen. Adjust your monitor and seyestraineat height so that you can look slightly down at the screen and place your feet flat on the floor.
  • Be screen smart. The brightness of your screen should match the light level in the room. Use an anti-glare display when possible, and keep it clean and dust-free. And make sure there’s as much difference between the background and text as possible by adjusting the screen’s contrast.
  • Follow the 20-20-20 rule. Shift your vision to a spot 20 feet away for at least 20 seconds every 20 minutes.
  • Give your eyes some R and R. When your eyes feel sore or tired, close your eyelids and cover them with a warm washcloth. Make sure to get enough shuteye, too. Your eyes replenish nutrients and relax as you sleep.
  • Wear your glasses or contacts. Uncorrected vision problems put extra strain on your eyes. Some people wear different lenses when using a computer. Special lenses with different designs, powers, and tints can help your eyes adjust to screen use.

Article from the StayWell Company, LLC

Italian Sausage Bean Soup

If your ingredients are flavorful, you don’t need a lot of fat. A single Italian sausage link will do. Once your beans are cooked, this soup takes no time at all.

italian sausage soup

Ingredients

  • Italian sausage link (about 1/4 pound)
  • 1 teaspoon olive oil
  • 1 stalk celery, sliced
  • 1 onion, chopped (about 1 cup)
  • 2 cloves garlic, peeled and crushed
  • 3 cups cooked white beans
  • 4 cups low-sodium chicken broth
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 1 14.5-ounce can diced tomatoes, no salt added
  • 2 cups shredded fresh escarole or spinach

 

Directions

Remove the sausage casing. Heat olive oil in the soup pot and add sausage, stirring to break up the meat into small crumbles. Brown the meat and remove some of the sausage fat by blotting with a paper towel. Add onion, celery, and garlic. Saute briefly. Add beans, chicken broth, bay leaf, and tomatoes. Heat thoroughly. Just before serving, add the escarole or spinach. It doesn’t have to cook–just wilt and stay a vibrant green.

 

Serves 6

Each serving contains about 214 calories, 16 g protein, 5 g fat, 6 mg cholesterol, 32 g carbohydrates, 8 g fiber, and 203 mg sodium.

Recipe from the StayWell Company, LLC

8 Ways to Motivate Yourself to Exercise

challengeYou know that exercise is important, but there are plenty of times you may not feel up to it. Here are eight ways to stay motivated to stick with your exercise program. Try at least one of these tips today. You’ll be glad you did!

  1. Choose activities you enjoy. Hate running? Don’t do it! Maybe you prefer walking around your neighborhood in the evening or taking an exercise class at the gym after work. If you enjoy the activity, you’re more likely to stick with it.
  2. Get others to join you. Whether it’s a family member, friend, or coworker, you can encourage each other to get out there and exercise even on days when you don’t feel like it.
  3. Do 10 minutes at a time. If fitting 30 minutes of exercise into your day feels too daunting, aim for two or three 10- to 15-minute bouts of activity.
  4. Plug it into your calendar. Schedule exercise sessions just like you would any other important event in your week.
  5. Focus on how you’ll feel afterward. Think about how much better you’ll feel, how much more energy you’ll have, and how glad you’ll be that you did it.
  6. Set goals. Do you want to lose weight? Run your first 5K? Get clear about your goal and create a plan for achieving it. Thinking about your goal can encourage you to exercise even when the couch is calling your name.
  7. Track your progress. Once you identify your goals, keep track of your achievements along the way. Seeing your progress can inspire you to keep going.
  8. Celebrate your success. Plan a reward for achieving milestones in your fitness journey. Choose non-food-related prizes, such as a new item of clothing, a pedicure, a night out with friends, or concert tickets.

Article from the StayWell Company, LLC

Healthy Breakfast Sandwich

Ingredients

Nonstick cooking spraybreakfast english muffin

4 eggs and 4 egg whites

1/4 cup minced chives

1/4 cup minced parsley

4 whole-wheat English muffins

4 1/2-inch round slices Canadian bacon

1 large beefsteak tomato, sliced into 1/2-inch thick slices

Directions

  1. Crack eggs and egg whites into a bowl and whisk. Add chives and parsley and stir to incorporate.
  2. Spray a large nonstick skillet with cooking spray. Ladle 1/4 egg mixture into skillet and cook, omelet style, until eggs are cooked through, about 1 to 2 minutes per side. Slide omelet onto a plate and repeat with remaining eggs; cover with foil to keep warm.
  3. In same skillet, heat Canadian bacon until warm, about 1 to 2 minutes per side. Toast English muffin. Fold omelet in to fit English muffin, then place omelet on 1 muffin half.
  4. Top with a bacon slice, then tomato, then top with other muffin half.
  5. Excellent source of: Protein, Fiber, Vitamin A, Thiamin, Riboflavin, Niacin, Vitamin C, Vitamin K, Calcium, Manganese, Phosphorus, Selenium
  6. Good source of: Vitamin B6, Folate, Copper, Iodine, Iron, Magnesium, Potassium, Zinc

Source: https://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/ellie-krieger/healthy-breakfast-sandwich-recipe-1940802

Get energized in the morning today!

Sure, an endless pot of delicious hot coffee can give you a morning jolt. But there are other ways to wake up raring to go. Try one for a more energized start to your day:

  • Say no to the snooze button. Those five extra minutes of sleep aren’t going to be restorative ones. Set your alarm for the time you actually need to get up.
  • Let the light in. Open your curtains or turn on the lights as soon as you awake. It’ll signal your body to stop producing melatonin, the hormone that induces sleep.
  • Put your sneakers on. Physical activity gets your blood flowing and ups your endorphins for a morning mood boost. Take the dog for a stroll, do an exercise DVD, or walk your kids to school.
  • Eat a healthy breakfast. You won’t be dragging after a fruit-and-Greek-yogurt smoothie, a vegetable omelet, or wheat toast topped with peanut butter and banana.

Article from the StayWell Company, LLC

9-healthy-breakfast-5

Visit the Kress Events Center!

KressGymDid you know that you can use the Kress Events Center for free as a UW-Green Bay faculty/staff (ongoing and 50% FTE or higher)? This includes the fitness center, group fitness classes, pool, racquetball courts, gyms, locker room, and more! During Fall/Spring semesters it’s free Monday to Thursday from open to 2:00 pm and 8:00 pm to close. On Friday to Sunday and during breaks/holidays it’s free from open to close.

If you wish to have unlimited access to the Kress Events Center you can purchase a membership for a highly discounted price. Payroll deduction is available for these memberships. If you wish to sign up for a membership or payroll deduction please visit the Kress Events Center front desk and fill out a form. For more information please see University Recreation Faculty/Staff Membership Program or visit our website at uwgb.edu/urec.

Beat stress eating today!

TrailMixCloseup-850x400When you’re stressed, your first reaction may be to reach for a pint of ice cream or a bag of potato chips. While indulging in comfort foods feels good in the moment, it doesn’t do much to tackle stress. And foods high in sugar and carbohydrates can become an unhealthy crutch, making you feel worse in the long-run.

That doesn’t mean you should avoid food altogether when you’re stressed. Food is a natural reward that keeps your brain and body going. You can snack when you’re stressed—you just have to pick the right foods.

 

What gives some foods their stress-busting powers? Pick healthy comfort foods high in these nutrients:

  • Vitamin C: In blood pressure patients, eating vitamin C on a regular basis was linked with lower blood pressure. What to eat: Reach for fruits packed with vitamin C like oranges and berries. Add some lemon to your water for an extra dose of the stress-fighting nutrient.
  • Vitamin B-6: Vitamin B-6 can lift you mood, reduce stress, and protect the immune and nervous systems. What to eat: Avocados are a great source of this vitamin. As a bonus, they’re also rich in potassium, which supports lower blood pressure.
  • Omega-3 fatty acids: Omega-3 fatty acids can help prevent stress-related conditions, like depression and anxiety, from developing. What to eat: If you’re feeling stressed, make it a sushi night. Load up on fatty fish like salmon and tuna.
  • Tryptophan: While tryptophan is known for its sleepy effects, the amino acid helps release serotonin. Serotonin helps you regulate moods, and when you don’t have enough, you’re at a greater risk of developing depression. What to eat: Turkey is packed with tryptophan, but if it’s not your favorite, try a handful of pumpkin seeds or a glass of milk.

You don’t have to completely swear off sweets when you’re stressed—dark chocolate may do the trick. The treat was shown to increase blood flow among heart disease patients.

Article from the StayWell Company, LLC

How To Build a Healthy Trail Mix

  • Total Time: 5 minutes
  • Yield: 4-5 cups

Ingredients

For the customizable version:

  • 1 1/2 cups raw nuts i.e. almonds, pecans, cashews, peanuts etc..
  • 1 cup raw seeds i.e. sunflower seeds, pumpkin seeds etc…
  • 1 cup unsweetened, unsulphured dried fruit
  • Fun stuff (amounts vary) i.e. 1/2 cup chopped dark chocolate, 1 cup popped popcorn, 1 cup pretzels etc..
  • Spice i.e. 1/4 tsp sea salt, 1/2 tsp cinnamon, pinch of nutmeg (optional)

My Go-To Trail Mix Recipe:

  • 3/4 cup raw pecans (I toast mine in the oven for 10 mins at 350 degrees F)
  • 3/4 cup raw cashews (I toast mine in the oven for 10 mins at 350 degrees F)
  • 1/2 cup raw sunflower seeds
  • 1/2 cup raw pumpkin seeds
  • 1/2 cup unsweetened, unsulfured cherries
  • 1/2 cup unsweetened, unsulfured raisins
  • 1/2 cup chopped 82% dark chocolate
  • 1/4 tsp sea salt
  • 1/2 tsp cinnamon
  • pinch of nutmeg

Instructions

  1. Combine all ingredients in a large bowl and mix well.
  2. Store in a ziploc bag or mason jar.
  3. Will keep for up to 1 month.

Source: https://www.thehealthymaven.com/2015/08/how-to-build-a-healthy-trail-mix.html

Brownie Kisses

Ingredients

  • 2 ounces unsweetened chocolateBrownieKiss
  • 1 stick trans-fat-free margarine, softened
  • 1 cup artificial sweetener
  • 1 large egg
  • 1/2 teaspoon vanilla
  • 3/4 cup whole-wheat flour
  • 1/4 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1/2 cup semi-sweet chocolate chips
  • 1/2 cup chopped walnuts

Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 350°F.
  2. Melt chocolate in small bowl in microwave oven on high for 1 minute. Stir until chocolate is completely melted.
  3. In a large bowl, beat butter with artificial sweetener.
  4. Beat in egg and vanilla.
  5. Stir in melted chocolate, then flour and baking soda.
  6. Add chocolate chips and nuts.
  7. Drop by rounded teaspoons onto an ungreased baking sheet.
  8. Bake about 8 minutes. Bottom will be firm. Cool on a wire rack.

Makes 36
Each cookie kiss contains about 65 calories, 1 g protein, 5 g fat (if made with butter), 13 mg cholesterol, 4 g carbohydrates, 1 g fiber, and 29 mg sodium.

This recipe is gout-friendly because it contains food moderate in purines. You should limit the amount of bran and wheat germ you eat to 2 ounces per day.

Recipe from the StayWell Company, LLC

Start Prioritizing Your Tasks

ToDoListIt’s all too easy to feel overwhelmed by your day-to-day life. And if you’re like most people, one of your big stressors is work. In fact, according to a recent survey by the American Psychological Association, work is the second biggest stressor for most people (money being the first).

Even if you love your job, there are probably days when it’s challenging. One of the easiest ways to combat stress at work is to get organized. Take a few minutes at the beginning of each day to determine your priorities—the tasks you must accomplish before work is over for the day. List them in order of importance, and plan how you’ll get them done. Check each task off the list as you complete it, and you’ll feel less stress—not to mention a greater sense of accomplishment at the end of the day.

Article from the StayWell Company, LLC