Wellness

9/11 Memorial Stair Climb

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IMG_3642 IMG_3631 IMG_3633IMG_3638 IMG_3639IMG_3629Thanks to all who helped and participated in the 9/11 Memorial Stair Climb on Monday, September 11th.  About 50 people walked the stairs from the 2nd to 8th floor of the Cofrin Library, including members of the military, Public Safety, Green Bay Metro Fire Rescue, UWGB Swim & Dive Team, firefighters, employees and students.  Members of Vets 4 Vets and Public Safety were on hand and had a table of items displayed, as well as refreshments for walkers, and Wellness Committee members handed out flag pins and provided encouragement to walkers.

See What You Know About Fruits and Veggies

Whether you heard it from your parents, your doctor, a government agency, or any number of media outlets, you are most likely familiar with the fact that fruits and vegetables are good for you. Here’s your chance to show the world (or just yourself) how much you know about the health benefits of produce.Quiz

Questions

1. True or false: When a fruit or vegetable has a vivid color that means it’s not as good for you.

2. When you’re prepping fruits and vegetables to eat, which of these precautions should you take to ensure they’re clean and won’t make you sick?

  • A. Wash your hands before handling produce
  • B. Rinse produce with warm water—even if you don’t eat the skin or peel
  • C. Cut away bruised or damaged areas before eating
  • D. All of the above

3. Which of these is not a proven health benefit of eating fruits and vegetables?

  • A. It boosts your mood.
  • B. It strengthens your immune system.
  • C. It improves your hearing.
  • D. It improves your psychological health.

4. True or false: It’s possible that eating fruits and vegetables helps prevent cell damage in your body.

Answers

1. False. In fact, vivid colors mean the produce is full of chemicals like carotenoids and flavonoids, which contain good-for-you antioxidants.

2. D—All of the above. If the produce has a firm skin, you should use a scrub brush to clean it.

3. C—It improves your hearing. Sadly, this hasn’t been found. But you should still eat a lot of produce, because the other three health benefits have been proven.

4. True. The antioxidants that are prevalent in produce might help combat a process in your body that triggers cell damage.

Article from The StayWell Company, LLC

Sugar; Too Much of a Bad Thing

This title is misleading, I don’t believe that any food should be labeled “bad” or even labeled “good”. There are foods that have more nutrients than others, like vegetables and fruits, compared to the nutritional profile of a cookie. The reason a cookie would be labeled “bad” is because of the high sugar content, which is fine in moderation, but when eaten too often, it can become a bad thing.

Sugar can come in different forms. Monosaccharides are the simplest forms of sugar, including, glucose, galactose, and fructose. Fruits and vegetables contain fructose, which is the most common monosaccharide. Disaccharides are made when two monosaccharides are joined. Sucrose, which is glucose and fructose, is the most common disaccharide and is the type found in table sugar. Lactose is the type of sugar in milk products and is glucose and galactose joined together. Monosaccharides and disaccharides are simple carbohydrates. Polysaccharides have multiple glucose chains and are complex carbohydrates. Starch is an example of a polysaccharide.

Healthy, well-rounded diets can contain broccoli and brownies, just more broccoli than brownies. Sugars in fruit and vegetables are naturally occurring and are metabolized more efficiently because they also contain lots of fiber, vitamins, and minerals. The fiber slows down the digestion, which keeps insulin and blood sugar levels stable. Sugar found in cookies, soda, and candy causes insulin and blood sugar levels to spike rapidly because there is no fiber or protein to stabilize these levels or to keep you full. Eat a mix of complex and simple carbohydrates.Chocolate_cake

Eating a variety of foods is part of life, including foods that have sugar. Enjoying one piece of cake at a birthday party is not going to harm you, as long as the rest of your diet includes lots of vegetables, fruits, whole-grain products, lean proteins, and dairy products that aren’t loaded with added sugar or fat. Eat the cake, just have it once in a while!

Article provided by Emily Burger, UWGB Dietetics Student

Sources: Johnson, R. K., Appel, L. J., Brands, M., Howard, B. V., Lefevre, M., Lustig, R. H., Wylie-Rosett, J. (2009). Dietary Sugars Intake and Cardiovascular Health: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association. American Heart Association, Inc., 120(11).    doi:https://doi.org/10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.109.192627

Well Wisconsin Incentives Are Taxable

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All incentives paid to participants of the group health insurance programs are considered taxable income to the group health plan subscriber and are reported to your employer for tax purposes. Health information, including responses to the health assessment, are protected by federal law and will never be shared with your employer.

If you are covered under the State of Wisconsin Group Health Insurance program, you are eligible for a $150 incentive to complete a health screening and assessment. Depending on your health plan, you may also be eligible for financial reimbursements for wellness related expenses such as gym memberships, fitness classes, the cost to participate in Community Support Agriculture (CSA) programs and rewards for participating in health or wellness programs or challenges. You can learn more information about the benefits available to you through the StayWell website (https://wellwisconsin.staywell.com/).

Per guidance from the federal government and the Internal Revenue Service (IRS), these benefits are classified as taxable fringe benefits. This means that any financial incentive you receive from the program is taxable income for state and federal tax purposes.

What this means for you:

  • Throughout 2017, financial incentives will be reported by your employer as a taxable wage and will be subject to applicable withholdings and taxes. You will see withholdings for incentives issued in the current calendar year reflected on your earnings statement. This will include incentives issued to your eligible family members.
  • If your incentive was already received, and you are paid on a bi-weekly basis, you will see the tax withholding on your August 31st paycheck.  If your incentive was already received, and you are paid on a monthly basis, you will see the tax withholding on your September paycheck.  The November earnings statements would include tax withholding for incentives issued through the October 20, 2017 deadline.
  • Withholding will include 7.65% for Social Security and Medicare and may include withholding for federal and state taxes, depending on the number of exemptions you claimed on your W-4.
  • Federal regulations require the payroll center to receive financial data regarding incentives issued to employees and their covered family members. Your health information is protected by federal privacy regulations and is not shared with your employer.
  • These taxable fringe amounts will be processed with the code: XHW (Tax Fr – Health/Wellness) earnings code.

Even with the federal government’s tax regulations, eligible employees are able to receive substantial financial rewards for using the wellness incentives offered by the State of Wisconsin and participating health plans.

Please contact Human Resources at payrollandbenefits@uwgb.edu or ext. 2390 if you have any questions.

September Wellness Webinar: Make Mealtime Family Time

MealtimeSometimes it’s hard to gather for a sit-down meal. But family meals can teach your kids health lessons that will stick with them for years to come. And, if you don’t have kids, it can help strengthen your relationship with your spouse/partner or another friend. This webinar will provide you with tips and ideas for making mealtime fun and even help persuade those picky eaters.

Date: Wednesday, September 20, 2017

Time: 12:00 to 1:00 p.m.

Location: Cofrin Library, 7th floor, room 735

No need to RSVP – just mark your calendar to join us, and bring your lunch!

You could also participate in this webinar at your workstation if you prefer – please visit wellwisconsin.staywell.com and go to Webinars to register.

Wellness webinars highlighting various health and well-being topics will take place the 3rd Wednesday of each month. All webinars will be recorded and available to Well Wisconsin Program participants on the wellness portal after the event date.

To access the wellness portal, you must be an employee, retiree, or enrolled spouse/domestic partner enrolled in the State of Wisconsin or Wisconsin Public Employers Group Health Insurance Program.

On-Site Health Screening on September 14th

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Know your numbers!

Register today for the on-site health screening event at UW-Green Bay for employees and their spouse/domestic partner who are enrolled in the State of Wisconsin Group Health Insurance Program!

Date: Thursday, September 14, 2017

Time: 7:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.

Room: Phoenix Room in University Union

Complete two easy steps by October 20, 2017 to earn the $150* Well Wisconsin incentive:

STEP 1: Get your 2017 health screening** – log in to wellwisconsin.staywell.com and click the Programs tab to register for this event.

  • You’ll be in and out in 20 minutes
  • Screening includes measurements for blood pressure, body mass index (BMI), cholesterol (HDL, LDL and Total), triglycerides and glucose
  • Fasting is not required, but is highly recommended for more accurate results
  • Screening completion will be displayed in the StayWell wellness portal within two business days. Your results will be automatically uploaded to your profile within 10 business days
  • On-site health screenings are confidential, free and voluntary

STEP 2: Complete the StayWell health assessment** at wellwisconsin.staywell.com

It takes about 10 minutes and is mobile and tablet friendly!

NOTE: You must register ahead of time for this health screening – they do not allow walk-ins that day.

If you already completed your health screening this past April, you do not need to complete it again in 2017.  There will be another on-site screening event in April 2018, for the 2018 Well Wisconsin incentive.

Questions? For more information on on-site health screenings or the Well Wisconsin Program, log in to wellwisconsin.staywell.com or email payrollandbenefits@uwgb.edu.

* Those enrolled in Humana’s Medicare Advantage plan or have a postal address outside of the U.S. are not eligible to receive the $150 incentive. The $150 incentive is treated as taxable income and will be reported to your employer.

** Individual health information will never be shared with the employer.

9/11 Memorial Stair Climb

 

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Join local firefighters, students, faculty and staff in memory of the brave souls who lost their lives the day of the attack.  Share your thoughts and memories of the day we swore as a nation to never forget as we climb the stairs of the Cofrin Library in respect to the fallen.

When: Monday, September 11, 2017 at 11 am – 1 pm

Where: Cofrin Library – 2nd to 8th floor stairwell

Vets 4 Vets and Public Safety representatives will be on hand, and there will be military, firefighter, and police related items/memorabilia on display at the plaza area of the library’s second floor.  Representatives from the Wellness Committee will be handing out flag pins to the first 50 people who climb to the 8th floor.

Do you remember where you were on September 11, 2001? Join the conversation on the Vets 4 Vets UW-Green Bay Facebook page and share your thoughts and memories.

Event presented by UW-Green Bay Vets 4 Vets Student Club, Public Safety and the Wellness Committee.

Produce May Be the Key to Happiness

 

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A silver lining … and a slice of apple? Research shows fruits and vegetables not only nourish your body—they also make you happier.

One possible explanation: The feel-good boost of knowing you’re eating healthy. By now, almost everyone has heard that fruits and vegetables form the cornerstone of a nutritious diet. So you should rightfully feel proud of placing them on your plate.

The Brain Power of Produce

But that’s not all. Healthy compounds in produce help your brain function properly, improving your psychological health. Star nutrients include:

Complex carbohydrates. All carbs provide an instant lift as glucose, insulin, and serotonin flow through your veins. But unlike simple sugars, which often cause you to quickly crash, complex carbs from starchy veggies and fruits keep your blood sugar and hormone levels steady.

B vitamins, including folate and vitamin B-6. Your body needs these nutrients to produce brain chemicals called neurotransmitters. Fall short and your emotions tend to run off track.

Some evidence also suggests that antioxidants in fruits and vegetables, including vitamins C and E, may help combat a process in your body that triggers cell damage. The jury is still out, but it’s possible antioxidants in fruits and vegetables may help keep your mood intact, and in particular, protect against depression.

Which Fruits and Veggies to Choose?

Health experts recommend at least five to nine servings per day of fruits and veggies. Create your own mood-boosting shopping list with these picks. They’re easy to find, low-cost, and can all fit into dishes your whole family will love.

Peas: Mix into pasta; stir into salads; or combine with onion, garlic, broth, and seasonings for a tasty soup.

Spinach: Use as a pizza topping, heat up frozen greens as a side dish, or heat in a pan with chickpeas for a tasty beans-and-greens sauté.

Bananas: Think beyond cereal—try bananas blended into smoothies, sliced lengthwise and topped with frozen yogurt, or even tossed with apples, lettuce, and peanuts for an unexpected salad.

Article from The StayWell Company, LLC