Canvas Certified Educator Program Call for Participants (Due Mar. 5, 2021)

The UW System Administration Office of Learning and Information Technology (OLIT) has issued a call for participants for the new Canvas Certified Educator skill mastery certification program offered by Instructure, the parent company of Canvas.

This professional development program for educators includes a series of six courses designed to strengthen knowledge and use of Canvas through hands-on experiences. Accepted applicants will receive a full scholarship to complete the program with a cohort of 37 UW System participants that will launch on March 29, 2021. More information about the program and application instructions are available in the call for participants.

Applications are due Friday, March 5, 2021.

Session with Dean of Students in March

Join the Dean of Students Office staff to learn how you can partner with them to help your students be successful while navigating personal and academic challenges. Learn what to do when you notice areas of concern, like grades dropping dramatically, unresponsiveness or disengagement, apparent personal or family issues, concern for student’s general well-being, misconduct, etc. March date and time TBA!

Register here

 

 

Teaching Enhancement Opportunities Showcase (March 3. 3-4 p.m.)

Join us March 3, 2021, 3–4 p.m. via Microsoft Teams for a virtual showcase of sustained programming opportunities that might be available to instructors through UW System and UW-Green Bay to support your educational development in the coming years. Highlights will include upcoming programming in Spring 2021 and annual programming opportunities:

  • Reading group for Agile Faculty—dates TBA
  • Annual OPID Spring Conference on Teaching and Learning—April 9, 16, & 23 2021, and usually in April each year
  • Annual Faculty College through the UW System Office of Professional Instructional Development (OPID)—June 1-4, 2021, and usually in late May or early June each year
  • Wisconsin Teaching Fellows and Scholars through the UW System Office of Professional Instructional Development (OPID)—Fall application deadline
  • Communities of Practice through UW-Green Bay’s Center for the Advancement of Teaching and Learning—Call for participants in Summer 2021 or Fall 2021
  • Early Career Teaching Fellows through UW-Green Bay’s Center for the Advancement of Teaching and Learning. Apply Spring 2021 to start in late Summer/Fall 2021

Register by March 3, 2021.

Register here

MS Teams group photo from IDI wrap-up session

Highlights from the 2021 Instructional Development Institute

Each January the UW-Green Bay Center for the Advancement of Teaching and Learning and the Instructional Development Council host the Instructional Development Institute, a conference for faculty and staff that promotes the continued development and application of best practices for teaching and learning. The conference was held virtually this year on Jan. 19 and 21 and consisted of a variety of synchronous and asynchronous presentations that explored this year’s theme, “Making Meaningful Connections”. UWGB staff and faculty made up the largest portion of presenters and attendees, though we also had individuals outside of UWGB both present and attend.

Troubling Connections: Five Lenses for Teaching Toward Justice, a presentation by our keynote speaker, Dr. Kevin Kumashiro, was perhaps the most popular session this year. The session explored fives lenses for understanding and making meaningful connections in higher education with an emphasis on how we might re-imagine and democratize education to work toward equity and justice. These five lenses are: 1) naming the moment, 2) curriculum as intervention, 3) contradictions of teaching, 4) learning through crisis, and 5) movement building as a frame. Dr. Kumashiro presented each lens one by one, providing both real world examples and citations for the philosophy behind them. Many attendees commented on how they were invigorated by the presentation, with some opting to dive deeper into these five lenses in a follow-up workshop later that afternoon.

Another standout session was The UWGB Land Acknowledgment: How to Meaningfully and Respectfully Recognize Wisconsin’s First Nations. The panel, comprised of several First Nations community members and instructors that teach in related studies, gave an overview of the First Nations people groups that once resided on the land our university now occupies. Attendees were encouraged to reflect on the importance of learning about and publicly acknowledging First Nations’ history. Our panelists offered several concrete suggestions for making the land acknowledgement a more regular part of our activities both for the university at large and within our individual classrooms.

The session Student Perspectives of Learning in a Pandemic, a live Q & A with a panel of five UWGB students and the Dean of Students, Mark Olkowski, also had high attendance. The panelists addressed instructor questions, offering honest feedback on topics like group work, discussions, virtual classroom settings, and instructor communication. The students often acknowledged the challenge of balancing academic rigor with a necessary level of flexibility to meet student needs during a pandemic when making their suggestions. The ability to honestly and openly engage with our students about teaching was a valuable experience for panelists and participants alike and we have already received requests to include student panels at future conferences.

In addition to these and many other live sessions, the Institute also included asynchronous “on-demand” sessions this year that span a range of topics from course accessibility to assessment of teaching. These asynchronous sessions come in the form of pre-recorded videos, PowerPoint presentations, and Canvas pages, paired with interactive elements like quizzes and discussions. During a time when it is understandably difficult to coordinate events synchronously, we were excited to have an opportunity to include more submissions in this way and hope to continue offering asynchronous options in the future.

If you were unable to attend this year, or attended but missed some of the sessions, it’s not too late to partake in what the Institute has to offer. Session recordings and other asynchronous content are now accessible in the Canvas course and will remain there until the end of spring semester. We highly encourage you to continue engaging with the materials there as you have the time and space. Consider also posting a comment or question in the session discussion boards to show support to your colleagues and contribute to these important conversations.

The Instructional Development Institute was made possible in great part through the hard work and participation of many of our faculty, staff, and students, so a huge “thank-you” to all that contributed to making this year’s conference a success. We very much enjoyed our time together and hope that you continue “making meaningful connections” in all that you do!