January 2022 Teaching and Learning Opportunities

Distance Education Certification Course Series (Jan. 3 – Jan. 21, 2022)

  • Teaching with Technology Basecamp Course: The first course is called Teaching with Technology Basecamp. This course includes information on course development in distance environments as well as technical information on Canvas and the various physical and digital rooms instructors will use for teaching distance education courses. As a basecamp, it will provide the essentials you need to be successful on the path to building your course. Learn more.
  • Course Design Trail Guides Course: While the basecamp will provide essentials, the second course, called Distance Education Trail Guides, picks up where the first course leaves off. The trail guides course centers on developing learning pathways for students. This course is for you if you have completed the basecamp and would like to explore more systematically how to develop distance education courses. You will be able to choose from one of two options: developing a synchronous course or developing an asynchronous course. Learn more.

2022 Instructional Development Institute (Jan. 11 & 12, 2022)

This year the Institute seeks to highlight how instructors have opened up their classes—and higher education by extension—in new ways. Don’t forget to register to virtually attend the Institute on Jan. 11 & 12, 2022!

Our keynote speaker this year will be Dr. Tracie M. Addy. Dr. Addy is the Associate Dean of Teaching and Learning at Lafayette College where she also directs the Center for the Integration of Teaching, Learning, and Scholarship. Dr. Addy’s keynote talk, titled “The Critical Importance of Inclusive Teaching in Higher Education”, will help us think about openness in higher education as it relates to inclusive teaching. She will also be leading a follow-up workshop titled “What Inclusive Instructors Do: Creating Welcoming Learning Environments.” Learn more.

Presentation & Discussion: “Niceness” and Inequality in Teaching and Learning (Jan. 13, 1–2 p.m.)

Join Christin DePouw (Associate Professor, Education & 2021-22 Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion Consultant) for a presentation and guided conversation on Jan. 13 from 1–2 p.m., where we continue prior discussions of humanizing pedagogies and white emotionality with a focus on “Niceness” in education. Learn more.

2022 Post-IDI Workshops: Addressing the Barriers to a Welcoming Learning Environment (Jan. 14 & 18, multiple times)

In alignment with Dr. Tracie Addy’s keynote address and workshop at the Instructional Development Institute, we wish to create opportunities for instructors to work together and address barriers to creating welcoming learning environments.

Think of this as structured work-time with colleagues rather than a workshop or a presentation about the topic! Learn more.

Approaching the Spring 2022 Semester & Mitigating COVID Disruptions

We know you may have questions or concerns about the upcoming semester and the possibility that you will have to temporarily adapt the way you teach or share information with students based on your own or numerous student illnesses. While we hope that doesn’t happen, know the resources below are available if it does.

We also know you may be tempted to improvise in the moment (e.g., using a cell phone to record a live class and post it to Canvas), but these sorts of solutions may create their own problems. A lecture recorded with a cell phone, for example, may present issues for remote learners—are the audio and video quality good enough for learners to understand and absorb the lecture? Can they see what’s on the whiteboard and monitors at the front of the classroom? What about participating in-class group work or discussions? 

Some more sustainable, equitable options could be: 

  • creating a formal note-taking buddy system among students 
  • modifying assessments with online submissions or flexible submission dates 
  • moving group presentations to a virtual, recorded format, such as Zoom, VoiceThread or PlayPosit, that students can comment on in Canvas 
  • “flipping” a course by recording lectures so students can watch them on their own time and devoting in-person class time to review/group work/collaboration 
  • reworking elements of your course to be asynchronous 
  • offering alternative options to in-class participation, like online discussions, journaling, or reflection 

Remember, CATL is always here to help with generating strategies to assist quarantined learners and instructors. 

Who To Contact About What

Your Chair, Dean, and others mentioned in the Chancellor’s 1/14/22 campus email can help with:

  • Questions about policies related to temporary pivots in instruction modality, special accommodations in your teaching, and any other class decisions related to COVID-19
  • You may also reach out to the COVID Response Team (covidresponse@uwgb.edu) and/or Associate Provost Courtney Sherman with policy and COVID-related questions

The CATL Team (CATL@uwgb.edu – teaching; DLE@uwgb.edu – teaching technology) will assist with: 

  • Teaching and learning (e.g., course design, assignment options, equity-based instruction) 
  • Using technology in course instruction (e.g., holding office hours in Zoom, having students use Microsoft Teams for group work, using the Canvas Zoom integration, recording videos for asynchronous instruction using Kaltura tools) 
  • Strategies to keep quarantined learners engaged and/or how to modify assignments or assessments to accommodate 

The GBIT Service Desk (GBIT@uwgb.edu) is your resource for:  

  • All other technical software or hardware questions, as well as technological support in campus classrooms (e.g., login issues, Office 365 and Sharepoint, non-teaching Zoom & Teams use, classroom projectors) 

Specific Vendor Support Services (varies by service – see links below under the appropriate tool) 

  • We have direct vendor support for many technological teaching tools. Although CATL can and will help with best practices, most purely technical questions are best answered by the support line for that software.  
  • Canvas support is available to instructors 24/7 
  • Vendor support is also available for Zoom, PlayPosit, and VoiceThread (see below) 

Resources for Specific Tools

Click on one of the headings below to expand the accordion and see the related guides.

Canvas

Learning management system. Allows instructors to post learning materials (readings, videos), create assessments (assignments, discussions, quizzes), and grade assessments. Also allows students to interact with course materials, submit assessments, and view their grades. 

Kaltura

Video recording, hosting, and sharing platform. Integrates with Canvas. Sometimes referred to as “My Media” within Canvas. 

Zoom 

Web conferencing application with features like chat, polling, and breakout rooms. Integrates with Canvas.

Microsoft Teams

Web conferencing application and file sharing platform. Best for courses centered around group projects and collaboration. 

PlayPosit

Platform for building and viewing interactive video content; can be used to create formative assessments during video playback. Integrates with Canvas and uses videos uploaded to Kaltura (My Media), YouTube, and Vimeo. 

VoiceThread 

Platform for conducting asynchronous discussion around a presentation or other media. Discussion takes the form of text, audio, and video comments. 

Presentation & Discussion: Culturally Sustaining/Responsive Pedagogy (CSRP) and Moving Beyond Guest Speakers (Feb. 17, 1–2 p.m.)

Join Christin DePouw (Associate Professor, Education & 2021-22 Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion Consultant) for a presentation and guided conversation, on Feb. 17, from 1–2 p.m. In this conversation, we consider the reliance on guest speakers within EDI work and how this “add on” approach limits true institutional transformation. We will discuss the additional professional and personal burdens that these requests place on colleagues of color and Indigenous colleagues, the role of Indigenous values (Christensen, 2011; Christensen & Poupart, n.d.2012) of respect, reciprocity, responsibility, and relationship in fostering equity-oriented instruction, and how equity-oriented educators can build their own capacity to integrate their curriculum and instruction beyond the use of guest speakers.

Register here for a Teams Meeting

Spring 2022 Events Digest

January

Consultations & Office Hours

Request a consultation with CATL staff to ask questions about anything teaching and learning related, brainstorm assignment design ideas, or if you need someone test new technologies with you, we’re here to help!

Request Consultation

2022 Post-IDI Workshops: Addressing the Barriers to a Welcoming Learning Environment (Jan. 14 & 18, multiple times)

In alignment with Dr. Tracie Addy’s keynote address and workshop at the Instructional Development Institute, we wish to create opportunities for instructors to work together and address barriers to creating welcoming learning environments.

Think of this as structured work-time with colleagues rather than a workshop or a presentation about the topic! Learn more.

Distance Education Certification Course Series (Jan. 24 – May 13)

  • Teaching with Technology Basecamp Course: The first course is called Teaching with Technology Basecamp. This course includes information on course development in distance environments as well as technical information on Canvas and the various physical and digital rooms instructors will use for teaching distance education courses. As a basecamp, it will provide the essentials you need to be successful on the path to building your course. Learn more.
  • Course Design Trail Guides Course: While the basecamp will provide essentials, the second course, called Distance Education Trail Guides, picks up where the first course leaves off. The trail guides course centers on developing learning pathways for students. This course is for you if you have completed the basecamp and would like to explore more systematically how to develop distance education courses. You will be able to choose from one of two options: developing a synchronous course or developing an asynchronous course. Learn more.
  • Distance Education Retreats: In the third course, you will participate in a community of practice that provides help and support during the teaching of your distance educations course while also exploring a topic of interest related to the teaching of your distance education course. Learn more.

February

Consultations & Office Hours

Request a consultation with CATL staff to ask questions about anything teaching and learning related, brainstorm assignment design ideas, or if you need someone test new technologies with you, we’re here to help!

Request Consultation

Presentation & Discussion: Culturally Sustaining/Responsive Pedagogy (CSRP) and Moving Beyond Guest Speakers (Feb. 17, 1–2 p.m.)

Join Christin DePouw (Associate Professor, Education & 2021-22 Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion Consultant) for a presentation and guided conversation, on Feb. 17, from 1–2 p.m. In this conversation, we consider the reliance on guest speakers within EDI work and how this “add on” approach limits true institutional transformation. Learn more.

“Opening Access: Understanding the Neuroscience of Traumatic Stress and its Impact on  Engagement and Learning” with Dr. Mays Imad (Feb. 21, 3–4:30 p.m.)

Join Dr. Mays Imad and the CATL staff on Feb. 21 from 3–4:30 p.m. as we consider the power of knowledge and how understanding the neuroscience of toxic stress can empower us to self-regulate and help our students, cope, engage, connect, and learn. Learn more.

 

Opening Access: Understanding the Neuroscience of Traumatic Stress and its Impact on Engagement and Learning with Dr. Mays Imad (Feb. 21, 3–4:30 p.m.)

Join Dr. Mays Imad and the CATL staff on Feb. 21 from 3–4:30 p.m. as we consider the notion of psychological trauma–why it happens and how it impacts our body and brain. We will examine the connections between stress and trauma and how stress can become traumatic when not acknowledged or managed. We will examine the neuroscience of traumatic stress and its impact on our ability to engage, connect, and learn. We will reflect on the questions of how we will welcome our students and colleagues to our institutions and classrooms this semester and beyond? What can we, educators, possibly do to help attend to their mental health and ameliorate their exhaustion and distress, while at the same time, intentionally engaging in self-care? We will consider the imperative of self-care while caring for others. Last, we will examine the principles, notable misconceptions, and practical examples of trauma-informed care, and reflect on the connections between trauma-informed education, healing, and restorative justice.

RSVP here for a Zoom Meeting Invitation

Call for Proposals: OPID’s Annual Spring Conference (Due. Monday, Feb. 7 2022)

FROM: The UW Office of Professional & Instructional Development (OPID)

OPID’s Annual Spring Conference

The Joys of Teaching & Learning / Cultivating community

  • Friday, April 22 & 29, 2022 (virtual, via Zoom)
  • 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. + Fireside chats
  • Registration is free to all UW educators

Call for Proposals

Proposal submission deadline: Monday, February 7, 2022

Cultivating community is an ongoing practice in the University of Wisconsin System, with 13 universities sharing a common purpose of educating, uplifting, and mentoring our students to seek meaningful, productive, and transformative lives.

Cultivating community is one of the objectives, challenges, and joys of teaching and learning. It results from intentional and sometimes not-so-intentional practices. It may be guided by faculty and instructors, but also emerges organically among students. How do we cultivate environments and relationships that result in a sense of belonging among our students? How do we extend teaching and learning beyond four walls of a classroom? What are some innovative ways to cultivate community online? How do we cultivate community with our partners in non-profit organizations, businesses, K-12 schools, in prisons?

Although the lingering Covid-19 pandemic has strained our work, it also reveals how change can empower us to adopt and adapt new teaching and learning practices. These new practices may be more flexible, effective, and relevant for these times. How do we cultivate community and a sense of belonging among students, faculty, instructors, and colleagues and employers external to the university? What barriers or challenges have you encountered when trying to cultivate community?

We invite you to participate in The Joys of Teaching & Learning / Cultivating community by sharing your experiences, ideas, questions, failures, and accomplishments. We welcome innovative and interactive proposals that strengthen a sense of community among UW faculty, instructors, and students. We encourage proposals that cross university and disciplinary lines, and that are grounded in the scholarship of teaching and learning. We invite Wisconsin Teaching Fellows & Scholars alumni to reengage with SoTL. We challenge faculty and instructors to open up new spaces for approaching and understanding teaching and learning in the UW System. Let’s re-imagine, re-define, and re-vision new possibilities for cultivating community.

Suggested Formats:

  • Break-out sessions – 30- or 60-minute presentations, panels, or roundtables
  • Posters or papers
  • Lightning rounds – 5-7-minute talks

Suggested Focal Points:

  • Equity-minded pedagogies
  • Digital pedagogies
  • Scholarship of Teaching & Learning
  • Grading, ungrading, and alternative assessments
  • High-impact experiential teaching and learning practices: First-year seminars and experiences, common intellectual experiences, learning communities, writing-intensive courses, collaborative assignments and projects, undergraduate research, diversity/global learning, ePortfolios, service- and community-based learning, internships, capstone courses.
  • Proposed new HIPs
  • Mental health and wellness for students and instructors
  • Mindfulness and burnout
  • Activism and resistance
  • Online STEM labs
  • Professional development for educators

We Welcome:

  • Pre-recorded and live sessions.
  • Multi-speaker presentations and panels, ideally from more than one university.
  • Multi-media and performative presentations.
  • Inclusion of student voices.

Proposal submission deadline: Monday, Feb. 7, 2022, via the online form.

Proposals will be anonymously reviewed by faculty and instructors in OPID’s Advisory Council.

Signature Programs Committee

Chair, Sylvia Tiala (UW-Stout); Members – Verda Blythe (UW-Madison), Abhimanyu Goush (UW-Stout), Veronica Justen (UW-River Falls), Bryan Kopp (UW-La Crosse), Mary-Beth Leibham (UW-Eau Claire), Heather Pelzel (UW-Whitewater), Erin Speetzen (UW-Stevens Point), Jamie White-Farnham (UW-Superior).

Questions?

Contact Fay Yokomizo Akindes, Director, Systemwide Professional & Instructional Development, fakindes@uwsa.edu or 608-263-2684.