Call for 2023 OPID Spring Conference – The Joys of Teaching and Learning: Centering Students (Applications Due Monday, Jan. 9)

The UW System Office of Professional & Instructional Development (OPID) has announced the details for their annual spring conference on teaching and learning! The 2023 conference will be held in person in Madison and via Zoom on Apr. 20 & 21, 2023, and the theme for this year is “centering students.” OPID invites you to participate by submitting a proposal about your teaching and learning experiences, ideas, insights, questions, failures, and accomplishments. The call is open to all UW educators, and proposals are due Monday, Jan. 9, 2023.

Learn More & Apply

Theme

The Joys of Teaching & Learning: Centering Students

Description provided by the OPID 2023 Spring Conference on Teaching & Learning website.

From the classroom to department meetings and from learning management systems to addressing mental health and wellbeing, students are the focus of our professional lives. In the past few years, we have increased our attention to centering our teaching practices around the “whole student.” Re-examining assessment strategies, updating curriculum, exploring teaching methods and modalities while increasing flexibility and compassionate responses to students’ needs are just a few examples.

Centering Students is what we do as educators and is tied to our goals, challenges and the rewards of teaching and learning. As we deal with the lingering effects of the COVID-19 pandemic, we have an opportunity to explore what we have learned, and what we still need to learn, about connecting with and supporting students. How might we consider what we need in terms of self-care and care for colleagues so we can feel a sense of well-being and enable us to better care for others around us? How do we cultivate relationships and create a sense of community with our students? How do we bring student voices into our face-to-face, online, and blended learning environments? What opportunities are there to cultivate connections both within and external to our class environments? How can we meet students where they are, while advising and mentoring them to succeed beyond our learning contexts?

We invite you to contribute to the conversation about centering students by presenting at OPID’s 2023 Spring Conference. Please share your experiences, ideas, insights, questions, failures, and accomplishments so we can collaborate and learn together to explore possibilities for centering students in our teaching/learning contexts.

Read more about the theme and plenary speaker on the OPID 2023 Spring Conference on Teaching & Learning site!

Questions?

Programmatic inquiries may be directed to Fay Akindes, Director of Systemwide Professional and Instructional Development, UW System, fakindes@uwsa.edu, (608) 263-2684.

Evidence-Based Approaches to Promoting Academic Honesty

Academic honesty has always been a concern in higher education, but the proliferation of technology has changed the scope and nature of the problem. Students have access to more electronic means to cheat, including AI-generated papers and websites that provide access to test bank questions and answers. Meanwhile, professors can deploy competing technologies designed to search automatically for plagiarized content, lock down browsers during exams, or remotely proctor test-taking.

It should come as no surprise that there are ethical concerns about both academic dishonesty itself and the privacy and intellectual property issues raised by technologies intended to detect or prevent it. In fact, one Canadian professor recently taught an academic course on cheating, and he is a co-investigator on a large-scale study of college student motivations to pay others to do their work.

The SoTL literature on this topic often lags behind the technological advances, but there are some recent studies instructors may find helpful. Duncan and Joyner (2022) surveyed students and TAs about digital proctoring, and although their sample was not representative, their resulting article is definitely worth a read. They provide a nice overview of costs of benefits of the practice, and they also effectively summarize the literature on alternative assessment strategies faculty can employ. Another recent addition to the body of knowledge on academic honesty is a study of six relatively low-tech and brief methods to reduce cheating, such as allowing students to withdraw assignments. Again, there are some methodological issues with the research, but instructors may find the techniques and review of past research on them illuminating.

The issue of academic integrity is complex, multi-faceted, and rapidly evolving given its intersection with emerging technology. Additional examples of relevant SoTL research on the topic are included below. CATL will update this list as we are able. Feel free to contact us with suggested resources as well.

Additional Resources

Call for 2023 Instructional Development Institute (Applications Due Monday, Nov. 14; IDI is Jan. 10th, 2023)

Introduction to IDI Theme

Cultivating student success in higher education requires the interconnected efforts of an entire university working toward shared goals. We are all needed to create the conditions that support students’ success through their growth in intellectual, socio-emotional, civic, cultural, professional, creative, or other realms. Although there is no single answer as to how universities can ensure students are successful, there are a variety of consistent, small, and transformative practices institutions of higher learning can employ to support students across their campuses. Innovation is occurring across all four of our UW-Green Bay campuses, from the ever-evolving classroom environment to novel advising and teaching approaches to administrative and policy changes. This year the Instructional Development Institute seeks to highlight and celebrate the ways all members of our university community support the success of students.

Call for Proposals

The call for applications has closed, however, we hope you will register to join us virtually for the conference on Tuesday, Jan. 10, 2023!

The Center for the Advancement of Teaching and Learning (CATL) and the Instructional Development Council at UW-Green Bay invite applications to present at the virtual Instructional Development Institute on January 10th, 2023, on the topic of “Cultivating Student Success.” We encourage applications that showcase strategies and practices both instructors and staff members have used to promote student strengths and address teaching and learning challenges. We also look forward to collaborative proposals that display the interconnected actions of faculty and staff. We encourage interested presenters to think broadly about topics, as cultivating student success is multifaceted and occurs in every aspect of campus life. Here are just a few possibilities: effective teaching strategies, first-generation college student programs, inclusive learning environments, college student mental health, universal design, open educational resources (OER), strategic advising, increased educational access, culturally-responsive pedagogies, high impact practices (HIPs), mentoring, and information literacy. 

There are multiple ways to participate, so please apply for the session format below that best suits you. Collaborators from other institutions are welcome to join proposals which include a UW-Green Bay presenter, and we are opening attendance at the IDI to other schools. 

How to Apply

The call for applications closed on Monday, Nov. 14, 2022.

Decide on your preferred format. You will be asked to provide your name(s), a description of your project, and your desired format. 

Submissions will be evaluated based on the clarity and quality of ideas, relevance to the theme, and potential to engage audience members.

Synchronous 

  • Live Presentation (20-25 minutes): A short, live presentation on a pedagogical or student success topic that participants wish to share. 
  • Panel Presentation (45-50 minutes): A small group of panelists presenting a shared topic around a specific pedagogical or student success topic followed by a live Q & A.  
  • Round Table Discussion (45-50 minutes): Presenters facilitate a focused conversation around a specific pedagogical or student success question, challenge, technique, or tool. You may apply individually or as a group. 

Asynchronous 

  • On-Demand Interactive Sessions: These sessions could consist of papers, posters, or pre-recorded presentations (up to 20 minutes long), with an online discussion board for Q & A or PlayPosit interactions. On-demand sessions will open at the beginning of the conference and run until the end of the conference. 

Questions?

If you have questions about proposals, submissions, or the IDI in general, please reach out to us at CATL@uwgb.edu!

Register to Attend the 2023 Instructional Development Institute (Jan. 10, 2023)

 

The Center for the Advancement of Teaching and Learning (CATL) and the Instructional Development Council are looking forward to hosting the upcoming  Instructional Development Institute on Tuesday, Jan. 10, 2023. The IDI will be a one-day completely virtual teaching conference that will feature live presentations, panels, and roundtable discussions by university experts on the theme of “Cultivating Student Success.” Sessions will explore the many ways university communities can (and do) support the success of students. This year’s conference will be online and hosted in a Canvas course. In December we will publish the Canvas course and email registered attendees instructions on how to access the course for the conference.  

About the Conference Theme: “Cultivating Student Success”

Cultivating student success in higher education requires the interconnected efforts of an entire university working toward shared goals. We are all needed to create the conditions that support students’ success through their growth in intellectual, socio-emotional, civic, cultural, professional, creative, or other realms. Although there is no single answer as to how universities can ensure students are successful, there are a variety of consistent, small, and transformative practices institutions of higher learning can employ to support students across their campuses. Innovation is occurring across all four of our UW-Green Bay campuses, from the ever-evolving classroom environment to novel advising and teaching approaches to administrative and policy changes. This year the Instructional Development Institute seeks to highlight and celebrate the ways all members of our university community support the success of students. 

Keynote Speakers

This year’s IDI features two keynote speakers and research collaborators who will address evidence-based challenges to student learning and corresponding effective teaching strategies. Dr. Stephen L. Chew is a cognitive psychologist whose videos for students on how to study have garnered millions of views nationally. He was the 2011 Carnegie Professor of the Year and the 2018 recipient of the American Psychological Association’s national award for distinguished teaching. Dr. Bill Cerbin is an educational psychologist and the founding director of the Center for Advancing Teaching & Learning at UW-La Crosse. Bill is a former Carnegie Scholar with the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching and is a nationally recognized expert on lesson study and the scholarship of teaching and learning, and the author of Taking Learning Seriously.” More information about the keynote session and workshops is coming soon!

 

An "I Voted" sticker on green plaid fabric.

Civility in the Classroom Post-Election

While this fall semester looks and feels different, social distancing does not mean that we are socially distanced from the events of the world around us. In fact, it sometimes feels as though being socially distanced from one another amplifies the impact of the events in the world around us.  

As we navigate the days and weeks after the Presidential election, we may find ourselves confronted with realities of this significant event even if we have not invited the election into our classroom. Our students may ask questions, discuss reports about the election, or share perspectives that we may not be prepared to guide an entire class through, especially in an online, asynchronous modality.  

If you are concerned about how you will engage students in polite political discourse as we move through the post-election responses, you are not alone. Here are a few resources that you might find useful as you consider if and how you could include discussion of the election in your course.  

The Students Learn Students Vote Coalition and Ask Every Student host a recurring virtual post-election gathering to discuss resources for campus stakeholders and faculty. Ask Every Student also provides a detailed Post-Election Campus Resource and Response Guide. The guide is broken into six key areas with suggestions and resources for each:  

  • Prepare partnerships ahead of time. 
  • Instill confidence in election results. 
  • Allow time and space for processing.  
  • Facilitate opportunities for healing.  
  • Hold spaces for dialogue and verbal expression. 
  • Move towards action. 

One way you can better support your students in engaging in polite political discourse is to create and frame a space for them to express their thoughts in your Canvas course. If you have a class discussion forum – you may call this the class questions, class forum, water cooler, or in the halls discussion board in your Canvas course – you could start a thread specifically to discuss the Presidential Election. Remind students with the initial thread that this is a public space for students to share their thoughts in a collegial and respectful manner. 

Maintaining civil discourse in an online environment is not a new concern and there are a lot of resources to help guide how you frame an online dialogue with students. Jean Dimeo’s 2017 article, “Keeping it Civil Online”, provides faculty-tested strategies. Alyson Klein’s more recent article, “Talking Civics in a Remote Classes in 2020: What Could Go Wrong?” contextualizes the challenges with online discourse to our current context. Plus, you can always reach out to CATL directly to share your ideas about how to frame a potentially charged conversation in your online class. 

If the thought of an open discussion forum leaves you a little uneasy, you may want to direct your students to other resources. You could post an announcement or refer students who reach out to you directly to any of the following virtual events: 

There are also resources on campus that can help students process their emotional response to the election. UW-Green Bay’s Wellness Center provides free counseling services for students and a variety of other resources related to wellness and mental health. Counseling is also available at the Manitowoc, Marinette, and Sheboygan campuses.

Every four years there is a significant political touch point that can ignite any classroom into incivility. Our goal as faculty is to foster polite political discourse. While that goal may seem more challenging in our current learning landscape, it is not impossible.