Addressing Racial Battle Fatigue at UW-Green Bay (Feb. 28, Mar. 28, & Apr. 25, 2023)

CATL is thrilled to sponsor a three-part series on Racial Battle Fatigue that will be led by Dr. Crystal Lepscier (Little Shell/Menominee/Stockbridge-Munsee), who currently serves UWGB as the First Nations Student Success Coordinator. The goal of the series is to center on the exploration of the idea of Racial Battle Fatigue and consider its impact on our holistic wellness in order to address the impacts of this phenomenon. This opportunity is open to faculty and staff who are engaged in race work and those from racially underrepresented groups who are interested in addressing the physical and psychological toll they have faced in this work. This is first and foremost a space to find balance and nourishment in our holistic wellness as educators and practitioners. While not intended to be a space equipped with a professional counselor, services and resources would be accessible and shared with any and all participants in this project.

All sessions will be from 3:30 to 4:30 p.m. in person in the Center for First Nations Education – Conference Room (Wood Hall 473). If you are interested in attending one or more of these sessions, please register by clicking the button below. The descriptions, dates, and times for all three sessions in the series are further down.

Register

What is Racial Battle Fatigue?

Tuesday, February 28, 3:30 – 4:30 p.m.

This session will focus on community building and creation of a space of wellness. Drawing from readings, we will learn about Racial Battle Fatigue (RBF) and Fasching-Varner’s (2015) definition, discuss impacts on health and wellness, and express our initial thoughts and reactions about the phenomenon. We will discuss connections to the idea of emotional labor in our work as well as discuss related subjects such as microaggressions and minority tax. It will be important to allow for an outward projection and comprehension of internalized fatigue, externalized fatigue, sole voice, and intergenerational responsibility and how one might carry this ‘emotional labor’ in their daily interactions.

Creative Methods to Address Racial Battle Fatigue

Tuesday, March 28, 3:30 – 4:30 p.m.

The second session focuses on addressing the phenomenon of Racial Battle Fatigue (RBF). We will briefly review the definition of RBF as a refresher. Participants will discuss anything they carried forward from the previous session, reflecting on RBF and potential impacts on awareness. We will then explore creative methods to help express RBF. A journal exercise will be introduced, along with writing prompts from spiral writing method by Lynda Barry. Tapping into our own stories is an important part of confronting RBF.

Collective Reflective Space

Tuesday, April 25, 3:30 – 4:30 p.m.

The third session will draw upon an Indigenous form for creation, connection, healing and expansion of our teachings. We will utilize a talking circle format to help consider our experiences, stories, and reflections on our journey to address Racial Battle Fatigue in ourselves. We will also use an arts-based project as another form of Indigenous expression for wellness and healing.

Events on AI, Machine-Generated Content, and ChatGPT (Feb. 10, Feb. 17, Mar. 24 & Apr. 7, 2023)

Have you heard the term “ChatGPT” and wondered what everyone was talking about? Are you thinking about how artificial intelligence and machine-generated content could help you as a teacher or complicate your ability to assess true student learning? Experts from across UW-Green Bay are coming together to help you! Please read on to learn more about the sessions being offered in Spring 2023.

ChatGPT Workshop (Feb. 10 & 17, 8 – 9:30 a.m.)

We are excited to announce that the Cofrin School of Business, with support from CATL, is hosting a workshop on ChatGPT! Come learn about ChatGPT by Open AI. Join CSB faculty in this interactive workshop to experience the most advanced chatbot and discuss implications for teaching and learning.

The workshop is moderated by Oliver Buechse, Executive in Residence, Cofrin School of Business. It will be offered on two different Fridays, Feb. 10 and 17, from 8 – 9:30 a.m. in the Willie D. Davis Finance and Investment Lab on the first floor of Wood Hall. The workshops are free and open to all UWGB employees.

If you need an accommodation for any of the sessions that are a part of the “ChaptGPT Workshop” please contact Kathryn Marten (martenk@uwgb.edu).

AI, Teaching, & Learning Series (Feb. 17, Mar. 24, & Apr. 7, 11:40 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.)

UW-Green Libraries, CATL, The Learning Center, and UWGB faculty are all coming together to offer a series of three workshops on machine-generated content applications and artificial intelligence tools such as ChatGPT and their potential impacts on teaching and learning. Participants will have the option to attend this series in-person or via Zoom. 

Teaching and Learning in the Time of ChatGPT | Friday, Feb. 17, 11:40 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.

UW-Green Bay instructors with expertise in artificial intelligence and machine learning will introduce us to AI-content generating tools, like ChatGPT, and their potential uses and pitfalls. Join other instructors for an engaging discussion about the impact on teaching and learning and a brief opportunity to test the tools themselves. 

Writing Assignments and Artificial Intelligence | Friday, Mar. 24, 11:40 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.

ChatGPT and other text-generating tools have raised concerns among instructors whose curriculum relies upon writing assignments from creative writing to lab reports and research papers. In this session, we’ll focus on the implications of these tools on writing and pedagogy, assessment, and curriculum design.  

Designing and Managing Authentic Assessments | Friday, Apr. 7, 11:40 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.

Students may inevitably use artificial intelligence and text-generating tools, but there are strategies instructors can explore and use to alleviate instructional stress around student learning. In this session, we will explore strategies for planning and developing authentic assessments to help students actively engage in their learning. This session will also offer instructors resources to help navigate the issues surrounding artificial intelligence and discuss ways to create assessments that embrace or acknowledge the use of AI and text-generating tools.

If you need an accommodation for any of the sessions that are a part of the “AI, Teaching & Learning Series,” please contact Kate Farley (farleyk@uwgb.edu).

“CATL, Cookies, and Conversation” on the Manitowoc Campus (Dec. 14, 11:40 a.m. – 12:35 p.m.)

Join CATL Director Kris Vespia and CATL Instructional Development Consultant Amy Kabrhel for a discussion of teaching and learning practices. Let’s reflect on our successes and struggles this semester and talk more about ways CATL can support you in your teaching. We’ll meet in F149 on the Manitowoc campus on Wednesday, Dec. 14, from 11:40 a.m. – 12:35 p.m. Please join us for this community conversation about teaching and learning and watch for CATL, Cookies, and Conversation events on the Marinette and Sheboygan campuses next semester.

Writing Effective and Reflective Teaching Philosophies (Oct. 21, 9:30 a.m.)

Teaching philosophies. We may think of them when required to write one for a job application or promotion file—or maybe you haven’t touched your teaching philosophy since graduate school. But there are many reasons educators can benefit from writing—and revisiting—a teaching philosophy. Teaching philosophies help us to reflect upon and articulate our ideas about what makes for effective teaching. And doing so helps to ensure that what we do in our classes is consistent with those beliefs and promotes student learning. In this workshop, we will share some basics of developing a teaching philosophy, including the components that can effectively illustrate your values as a teacher and the details of how you’ve enacted and evolved your craft. Join us for our open exchange of ideas this Friday, October 21, from 9:30 – 10:30 a.m., in the CATL Conference Room (CL 405) or via Zoom.

Cold Lunch & Hot Topics: “How Do We Promote Civil Discourse in Classes?” (Oct. 31, 11:30 a.m.)

Bring your lunch and join the conversation with CATL and instructors from across the institution as we discuss a hot topic in teaching and learning! Our October conversation will explore the issue of classroom civility. How do we promote civil discourse in classes?

  • Dates and Times:
    • Monday, Oct. 31 from 11:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
  • Location: Cofrin Library 405C (CATL conference room) and virtual

Register to receive a calendar reminder or drop in either in-person or virtually during the session. If you’d like to prepare your thoughts before our meeting, you may find the Inside Higher Ed article, “The Challenges of Teaching Controversial Topics in a Divided Society,” a good starting point.

Do you have an idea for a future Cold Lunch & Hot Topic? Email CATL Director Kris Vespia (vespiak@uwgb.edu).