Featured Student: Alison Klein

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  1. When are you graduating? I plan to graduate May 2020.
  2. What are your career plans? I would love to go into something regarding Neuroscience.
  3. Why did you major in psychology? The brain is fascinating and there’s still so much more to learn about!
  4. What do you do for fun? I like to read and just being outside camping and hiking.
  5. What academic experience or accomplishment are you most proud of? Being a part of Dr. Cowell’s neuroscience lab this semester :) and being able to partake in an independent study last spring
  6. What is your favorite movie, book, and TV show related to psychology? My favorite movie is Silence of the Lambs or Split. Favorite book is The One Who Flew Over the Cuckoos Nest. Favorite TV shows are Rizzoli and Isles or Dexter.
  7. What single thing do you hope to accomplish at UWGB before graduating? Be accepted into medical school, grad school, or both :)
  8. What else do you want people to know about you? I love the UWGB psych staff, they are definitely awesome!
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Faculty Research: Motivational profiles in table tennis players/Relations with performance anxiety and subjective vitality

Unknown-1Chu, T. L., Zhang, T., & Hung, T. (in press). Motivational profiles in table tennis players: Relations with performance anxiety and subjective vitality. Journal of Sports Sciences. doi:10.1080/02640414.2018.1488517

This studies focus was on what made up the motivational profiles of a sample of table tennis players, comprised of gender, country, training status, and their competitive level (from recreational leagues to international) as well as to compare, within the motivational profiles, the differences in performance anxiety and subjective vitality.

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Faculty Research: Relations between sociocultural pressures and weight control behavior among early adolescent boys

Unknown-1Chu TL, Martin SB, Petrie TA, Greenleaf C. Relations between sociocultural pressures and weight control behavior among early adolescent boys. Psychol Schs. 2018;1–13. https://doi.org/10.1002/pits.22212

This study examined the frequency of weight control behaviors in early adolescent boys based on ethnicity and grade level as well as the sociocultural pressures to try to lose weight, gain weight, exercise, and diet to see if that could predict WCB’s (or working cell bank).

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Title: Episode 62: Circadian Rhythms, Glioblastoma, and Timing in Research(with Lorenzo Lones)

Description: In this episode, our host Ryan Martin is joined by guest and UW-Green Bay alum, Lorenzo Lones. Listen in as they discuss circadian rhythms and glioblastoma, how the present research is conducted, and Lorenzo’s recent TEDx talk. If you have yet to hear Lorenzo’s full story, make sure to check out his Psi Talk, titled “Timing is Everything.”
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Successful Tips for Students: Note Taking and Advising Sessions!

The 3 Reasons Why Taking Notes During Advising Sessions is So Important and 3 Suggestions for How to Take Good Notes!

Why Taking Notes is so Important!

1. Taking notes during advising sessions makes it possible to remember what happened.

It’s hard to remember all of the things that go on during your advising session. Taking notes helps you to keep track of everything that you discussed with your advisor. If you forget what happens, you can always refer back to your notes!

2. Taking notes helps you to stay focused.

Taking notes helps you to focus on the key points that you cover in your advising session. They help you to pinpoint the important things and helps you to prioritize your tasks.

3. Taking notes can help you to keep track of the questions you asked your advisor and may help you develop new questions you have for your advisor that you can ask them at your next advising appointment.

If your advisor helps you to find a solution to a question you asked and that same question arises in the future, you can always refer back to your notes to try to resolve your question on your own. Also, as your advisor answers the questions you have, more questions may arise. You can then make notes of the specific questions you want to ask your advisor at your next advising appointment, to make sure you can continue to progress in the tasks you want to complete.

How to Take Good Notes During and Advising Appointment!

1. Use a pen and paper.

Taking your notes on pen and paper keeps your conversation with your advisor more open and personal. It can be hard to make good eye contact with a screen front of your face. Electronic devices also are more prone to causing distractions, such as notifications or the ability to open other browsers while your advisor is explaining something, and you might miss some important information that you advisor is tell you. It may be old fashioned, but pen and paper work best.

2. Just highlight the key points.

Making categories in your notes like “Classes” and “Internships” is a great way to only highlight the key points. It’s impossible to write down everything single thing you and your advisor talk about at your appointment, but keeping track of the key points will help you to have a solid list of your questions that were answered and the tasks you developed from your appointment.

3. Learn shorthand.

It can be tough to write everything out word for word at your advising appointment. Learning how to use shorthand, such as w/ means with, helps you to get more information on the paper at a quicker pace. Having a legend of all of your shorthand and what it means may be very helpful when you look back at your notes, so you can understand what you wrote.

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Episode 61(LIVE): Scary Movies

Info: How do you feel about scary movies? In this special LIVE episode, Dr. Ryan Martin is joined by Dr. Jason Cowell and student Sammy Alger-Feser to discuss scary movies. They dive into their feelings on the genre, common physiological reactions, and why people may or may not choose to watch them!

Other Links:

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Featured Alumni: Allee Meerdink (Schramm)

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1. When did you graduate?
I graduated in May of 2017. 
 
2. What do you do now?
Right now, I am working for a staffing company in the compliance department. The company staffs traveling nurses, and once a nurse takes an assignment, I work with them to make them compliant to the hospital checklist. A lot of the work is related to HR, which is something I am interested in going to graduate school for in the future.
 
3. Why did you major in psychology?
I majored in Psychology because it was always something I was interested in! I love learning about research and the how behind the brain’s mechanisms. 
 
4. What do you do for fun?
Right now, just exploring the new city my husband and I just moved to! We’re both originally from the Sheboygan area, and we moved to Appleton this summer. Close enough to UWGB to visit sometime :)
 
5. What academic experience or accomplishment are you most proud of?
I think I am most proud of all of the roles I head through my academic career (Psi Chi President, Research and Teaching Assistant, Internship with Ryan Martin, Peer Mentor, any many others). I am also really proud to have been honored with the Chancellor’s Leadership Medallion my senior year.
 
6. What’s your favorite movie, book, and TV show, related to psychology?
My favorite book and movie (new version) related to Psychology is The Great Gatsby! I love watching the character development in both and how each character has such depth. I literally love the Great Gatsby so much that I used the theme for decor at my wedding!
 
7. What’s an important goal or accomplishment you are currently working on?
An important goal in my life is to first find what career would make me the most happy. I’m enjoying being newly married right now, but I really want to pursue graduate school. At this point, I’m in-between a few possible programs. Hopefully I’ll figure it out soon and start working towards a masters degree!
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