Encourage

The Power of What We Can Do

P. H. D.

Three little letters. On their own, they don’t look all that impressive. Once you learn a little about their significance, though, you find that those three little letters mean a great deal. A Ph.D. is the highest academic degree. As such, it takes years of intensive study to earn one. With an introduction like that, you might get the impression that I wrote this blog post to brag about the prestige of a Ph.D. That’s not at all what this is about, as you’ll see below. Continue reading

Vet Lounge 002

Supporting Our UWGB Veterans

UWGB is ranked No. 26 in the Midwest for 2015 Best Colleges for Veterans. So it is not surprising that last week the Chancellor’s Council on Diversity and Inclusive Excellence held a workshop on “Veterans Reintegration from Combat to the Classroom.” It was packed full of highly valuable information that each faculty and staff should be aware of in supporting our veteran students on campus. Continue reading

QM Process

Hook, Line & Sinker at Quality Matters

“Charting the Course”, “Navigating the Currents of Change”, “Set Sail on a Course Tour”, “A Voyage through QM”.

The harbor-based puns (and subsequent groaning) came hard and fast at the 6th Annual Quality Matters Conference held in Baltimore, which I was lucky enough to attend and present at in September. The conference attracts faculty, designers and administrators from across the county to learn more about Quality Matters and it is a great opportunity for CATL to learn more about the process, share our progress and network with institutions with similar goals. Continue reading

Books on a shelf

You Don’t Know How To Read

“You don’t know how to read,” I’ve fantasized about saying to my students. Then, I realize that they would quite rightly be offended. Of course my students are literate: some of them are even very skilled readers. However, many of them lose this skill when reading theoretical or philosophical arguments. Beyond tried and true methods of insuring that reading “compliance” occurs (quizzes, online quizzes, literature circles,discussion…), I wanted to know how to help my students learn to read like a political theorist. Continue reading

Woman holding a red colored heart that is torn down the middle

Breaking Up Is Hard To Do

Before I became a professor, I utilized PowerPoint a great deal in my professional life. In fact, I prided myself in my ability to use the software and create dynamic presentations that interested whatever audience to whom I was speaking. In fact, when I first became a professor at UWGB, I felt as though my ability to use PowerPoint would be a strength to my teaching career. Boy, was I wrong! Continue reading

Vintage picture of female school teachers sitting in classroom

Myth of the Gender Neutral Classroom

Many of my female faculty colleagues probably experienced being addressed as Mrs. or Ms. at least once every semester and not just by incoming freshmen. Or they read comments about shoes in their end-of-semester evaluations. But are those isolated incidents or does gender matter in how students perceive the knowledge and expertise of an instructor? Do they see differences in pedagogies? Types of course work that male and female faculty assign? Do students find female instructors more relatable? Do they themselves behave differently in the classrooms of male and female instructors? Last academic year, I finally got a chance to collect data on several of these research questions as part of our Teaching Scholars Program. Continue reading