Distance Education Certificate and Course Enrollments (Spring and Summer 2022)

The Provost’s Office has launched a Distance Education Certificate program. With the help of the CARES Act and the Provost’s Office, instructors who participate will earn stipends for completing courses in the program. Anyone developing or reconfiguring a course for any of the distance education modalities is encouraged to participate.

The certificate program consists of three courses. Instructors will earn stipends after completing each of the courses, which act as steps in the certification sequence. Instructors will earn a badge after completing the first and second courses in the sequence, and the distance education certificate after completing the third course.


Course Availability & Deadlines

To comply with HR policy, after registering, CATL will reach out to your unit chair so they can approve your participation. Once approved, you will receive an email welcoming you to the course. Registrants must finish the course before the dates listed below, or reapply for a subsequent semester to complete the course.

Teaching with Technology Basecamp:

  • Spring 2022 registrants must finish by May 13, 2022.
  • Summer 2022 registration is now open (see below).  Registrants can begin can begin May 23 and must finish by June 24, 2022.

Course Design Trail Guides:

  • Spring 2022 registrants must finish by May 13, 2022.
  • Summer 2022 registration is now open (see below).  Registrants can begin can begin May 23 and must finish by June 24, 2022.

DE Retreats:

  • Spring 2022 registrants must complete their projects by May 13, 2022.
  • Registration for DE Retreats will re-open for the Fall semester.

If you have questions about these courses, please contact CATL at catl@uwgb.edu. If you have any questions about the approval process, please contact HR at hr@uwgb.edu.

Tents illuminated from within on a dark night.The first course is called Teaching with Technology Basecamp. This course includes information on course development in distance environments as well as technical information on Canvas and the various physical and digital rooms instructors will use for teaching distance education courses. As a basecamp, it will provide the essentials you need to be successful on the path to building your course. Those interested can register for “Basecamp” here to receive further details.

With a few foundational concepts in hand, the second course, called Distance Education Trail Guides, picks up where the first course leaves off. The trail guides course centers on developing learning pathways for students. This course is for you if you would like to explore more systematically how to develop distance education courses. Through Trail Guides, you will develop either a synchronous or asynchronous course.

Register for “Trail Guides” Here

The second course helps with course development but, as we all know, planning and doing present separate issues.

A geodesic retreat in the woods.The third course is offered in Fall and Spring semesters. In Distance Education Retreats, you will participate in a community of practice that provides help and support during the teaching of your distance educations course while also exploring a topic of interest related to your instruction.

Register for “DE Retreats” Here

Resources on Dual Domain Pedagogy and Growth Mindset

Recently Dr. Angela Bauer, former UWGB instructor and current Vice President of Academic Affairs at High Point University, visited our institution and presented her research regarding the equity gaps in introductory science courses. We invite you to engage with the readings and videos below to learn more about dual domain pedagogy (both cognitive & affective) and its relationship to equity gaps in the college classroom. If you would like to talk more about how you might use this information in your teaching, feel free to request a consultation with a CATL member. Please remember as you consider these resources that growth mindset interventions should not be used to de-legitimize real structural, systemic, economic, etc., obstacles that students face.

  • On Mar. 4, 2022, Angie Bauer visited the Green Bay campus and gave a presentation on her research titled Tapping into the Affective Domain of Learning to Close Classroom Performance Gaps. View the recording by clicking on the link and then logging in with your UWGB credentials.
  • You can also read the study that Dr. Bauer contributed to, Fostering Equitable Outcomes in Introductory Biology Courses through Use of Dual Domain Pedagogy. The article describes Dr. Bauer’s work at High Point, including growth mindset interventions and the impact on equity gaps.

A great place to start learning about growth and fixed mindsets is with the work of Carol Dweck, who is the psychologist best known for research on this concept. Watch this 50-minute talk on YouTube which Dweck gave in 2019 at the Annual Convention of the American Psychology Association, or, for a shorter watch, check out her TED Talk from 2014. You can also read the first three chapters of her book, Mindset: The New Psychology of Success, online for free. These are, of course, just a starting place—to dig deeper, check out the research articles in other sections of this guide.

  • For a good overview of growth and fixed mindsets, including specific examples, research findings, and even videos illustrating educators using growth mindset language in class, check out this guide from the MIT Teaching + Learning Lab.
  • Also found on the MIT Teaching + Learning Lab site is Dr. Elizabeth Canning's 1-hour talk about growth mindset and research surrounding the impact of instructors’ mindset on student success. There’s also a written summary of some of the relevant research on this site. Note some of her full articles are included in the "Influence of Instructor Mindset on Students" section of this post.
  • Academic Affairs at the University of Arizona has a series of "Learning to Learn" strategies for teaching and learning, including an overview of growth mindset with videos and practical tips for instructors.
  • One potential growth mindset intervention, if used well, is normalizing struggles and even failure. Read about Stanford University’s institutional attempt at reinforcing this idea and watch brief videos from the project.
  • Transforming Education has some sample strategies for supporting students' growth mindset, as well as a growth mindset toolkit. Although intended for K-12 educators, these sites provide some helpful, practical tips about encouraging growth mindset as an instructor that could be adapted for higher education, as well as video clips, PowerPoint presentations, and graphics.
  • Dr. Bauer referenced the affective domain of learning in her "dual domain pedagogy" intervention. The affective domain is an extension of Bloom's taxonomy created by psychologist David Krathwohl, one of Bloom's colleagues. We are typically more familiar with the cognitive domain, but this document by Indiana University provides a nice overview of the affective realm.

A critical research finding is that instructor mindset influences multiple factors for student success, including students' motivation, academic performance, and whether growth mindset interventions will be effective on them. These results are important to consider as we transition to becoming an access institution. If we expect students will be less capable as we embrace that mission and believe that ability is fixed, will we produce the poor results we expect?

  • It is vital to remember that growth mindset is not about telling students to “think positive” and expecting it to achieve miraculous results. For one thing, growth mindset is not the same as “thinking positively.” For another, students may experience a number of obstacles to academic success, and no one is suggesting mindset will overcome issues such as poverty. Living in poverty, for example, can be associated with a greater fixed mindset, for understandable reasons. That said, a national study suggests that children with a growth mindset had some buffer against the effects of poverty on their academic performance.
  • For another interesting read, these authors explored how the mindsets of 875 organic chemistry students changed across a semester. In their analysis of students' responses, they found that students attributed their own beliefs about the malleability of intelligence to five main factors: academic experiences, observing peers, deducing logically, taking societal cues, and formal learning.

Growth mindset research is one of those areas that has endured some criticism as part of the social science “replication crisis.” For those of you interested in really digging into that, the articles below are good resources. We also include them because they do point to some of the nuance involved in this work. For example, the success of growth mindset interventions on a student's academic performance may also be tied to the student's trust in their instructor, as indicated in the third article.

Call for Pilot Program Peer Teaching Mentors (Due April 1)

On the recommendations of the UWGB Teaching Effectiveness Working Group, the University Committee and the Provost’s Office agreed to a two-year program to pilot a peer teacher mentoring effort. The UC, in consultation with the Center for the Advancement of Teaching and Learning, calls for two tenured faculty teaching mentors to lead the effort. These teaching mentors will each work with eight untenured colleagues in two cohorts each over two years. As compensation, each teaching mentor will receive one course reassignment for each of the two years piloting the project.

Full Program Description and Call for Applications

To Apply

Please send the following in one PDF to catl@uwgb.edu by April 1, 2022:

  • A short statement of teaching philosophy and how you would use that philosophy to work with mentees (no more than one page).
  • A short vita that focuses on teaching performance and professional development related to teaching (no more than two pages).
  • A letter from your unit chair that affirms their support for a course reassignment (ad hoc funds are available from the Provost’s Office to support this reassignment).
  • (Optional): Up to three supporting documents highlighting teaching effectiveness (e.g., course syllabi, examples of student work, Scholarship of Teaching and Learning, letter of support from a colleague who can speak to teaching and/or mentoring work you’ve done, etc.).

Contact Jon Shelton with any questions about the program or application process.

Resources on Trauma-Informed Education

As a follow-up to Mays Imad’s recent talk at our university, we invite you to explore the resources below on topics related to student and employee mental health, as well as trauma-informed education in general and some specific strategies for instructors and staff members. Please know that we are focusing on individual well-being and intervention strategies simply because that is what people have the most power to change. We fully recognize that there are also larger systems and structures (and pandemics) in place that play a significant role in the issues Dr. Imad addressed.

College Student Mental Health: Challenges & Resources 

Employee Wellness: Challenges & Resources 

What Is Trauma-Informed Education? 

What Are Some Potential Trauma-Informed Practices? 

Student Parent Advocacy Workshop (Mar. 24, 12-1 p.m.)

As part of their equity, diversity and inclusion (EDI) work this semester, Shannon Ribich (2021-22 EDI Intern) and Katia Levintova (2021-22 EDI Embedded Faculty Consultant) would like to invite everyone interested, to their workshop on helping student parents to have better educational experiences. This workshop is scheduled for Thursday, March 24, 12-1 via Zoom. In this workshop, Shannon and Katia will discuss the most pressing educational problems of student parents, especially access to HIPs, offer some solutions (both nationally and on our own campus) and then will ask participants to contribute their ideas on what we can do better institutionally and in our own areas and use it as a beginning of action plans (both institutional and personal ones).

Participants will receive badges recognizing their contributions in addressing this issue on our campus.

Register here to save your seat and get a calendar reminder

Resources and Follow-Up

You can read a follow-up blog post on this event by Katia Levintova and her EDI student intern Shannon Ribich here. If you are interested in completing reflective activities to earn a badge on this topic, you can also email CATL@uwgb.edu for more information.