Ungrading Teaching Circle (Summer 2022, Register by Jun. 8)

Have you ever considered ungrading but don’t know where to start? Looking for other instructors who are trying alternative forms of assessment in their courses? Seeking feedback on ungrading ideas? Join the Ungrading Teaching Circle this summer! In this short, low-stakes teaching series led by Kris Purzycki (Assistant Professor, Humanities), we’ll discuss the “whys” and “why nots” of ungrading before focusing on trying some techniques. Our series will conclude by applying our experiments to Canvas as we explore how the LMS can support ungrading and other alternative forms of assessment.

Participants will meet virtually four times during the summer based on collective availability. Please register by Wednesday, June 8, so that we can gauge interest and send out a poll to determine the meeting dates and times.

Register

LTDC Virtual Showcase (June 21 & 22, 2022)

Submit a Proposal

The UW System Learning Technology Development Council (LTDC) is now accepting proposals for their annual virtual showcase. The theme for this year’s conference is “On Resourcefulness and Resiliency” with three tracks: “Student Experience and Success”, “Instructional Pedagogy”, and “Leveraging Learning Technology.” Proposals for both live sessions and pre-recorded short videos (TechTalks) are welcome. The deadline to submit proposals has been extended to Monday, May 9 at 12 p.m. Learn more and apply.

Register to Attend

Register to attend this free virtual conference on June 21 & 22, 2022! The showcase includes panels, presentations, and TechTalk virtual sessions in polysynchronous format (i.e., some presentations are pre-recorded while others are “live”). Register here.

Theme and Keynote

On Resourcefulness and Resiliency

The pandemic has taught us much as it relates to defining the student experience, helping our students find success, designing impactful learning experiences, and leveraging technology to promote deeper learning. Some things worked. Some things didn’t work. Yet as time goes on, we continue to learn, grow, and find new and better ways to improve our teaching, course design, and sense of belonging.

With no playbook on how to navigate a pandemic, we have found ways to strengthen our resourcefulness and resiliency. At times, we practiced resiliency to cope with constant changes. Other times we had to rely on our resourcefulness when sudden pivots were needed.

Reflecting on our journey, sharing our experiences, learning from them, and taking the knowledge gained into our next experiences is key to personal and professional growth. Join us this summer as we explore these themes of resourcefulness and resiliency as we emerge from the pandemic and define what becomes our new normal for teaching, learning, and the intentional use of technology.

Join keynote speakers Merlyna Valentine, international speaker, author, and consultant, and Katie Linder, Associate Vice Chancellor for Digital Strategy and Learning at the University of Colorado-Denver, instructors, and staff throughout UW-System on June 21 & 22, 2022 as we explore the themes of resourcefulness and resiliency as we design the new normal for teaching and learning.

Distance Education Certificate and Course Enrollments (Spring and Summer 2022)

The Provost’s Office has launched a Distance Education Certificate program. With the help of the CARES Act and the Provost’s Office, instructors who participate will earn stipends for completing courses in the program. Anyone developing or reconfiguring a course for any of the distance education modalities is encouraged to participate.

The certificate program consists of three courses. Instructors will earn stipends after completing each of the courses, which act as steps in the certification sequence. Instructors will earn a badge after completing the first and second courses in the sequence, and the distance education certificate after completing the third course.


Course Availability & Deadlines

To comply with HR policy, after registering, CATL will reach out to your unit chair so they can approve your participation. Once approved, you will receive an email welcoming you to the course. Registrants must finish the course before the dates listed below, or reapply for a subsequent semester to complete the course.

Teaching with Technology Basecamp:

  • Spring 2022 registrants must finish by May 13, 2022.
  • Summer 2022 registration is now open (see below).  Registrants can begin can begin May 23 and must finish by June 24, 2022.

Course Design Trail Guides:

  • Spring 2022 registrants must finish by May 13, 2022.
  • Summer 2022 registration is now open (see below).  Registrants can begin can begin May 23 and must finish by June 24, 2022.

DE Retreats:

  • Spring 2022 registrants must complete their projects by May 13, 2022.
  • Registration for DE Retreats will re-open for the Fall semester.

If you have questions about these courses, please contact CATL at catl@uwgb.edu. If you have any questions about the approval process, please contact HR at hr@uwgb.edu.

Tents illuminated from within on a dark night.The first course is called Teaching with Technology Basecamp. This course includes information on course development in distance environments as well as technical information on Canvas and the various physical and digital rooms instructors will use for teaching distance education courses. As a basecamp, it will provide the essentials you need to be successful on the path to building your course. Those interested can register for “Basecamp” here to receive further details.

With a few foundational concepts in hand, the second course, called Distance Education Trail Guides, picks up where the first course leaves off. The trail guides course centers on developing learning pathways for students. This course is for you if you would like to explore more systematically how to develop distance education courses. Through Trail Guides, you will develop either a synchronous or asynchronous course.

Register for “Trail Guides” Here

The second course helps with course development but, as we all know, planning and doing present separate issues.

A geodesic retreat in the woods.The third course is offered in Fall and Spring semesters. In Distance Education Retreats, you will participate in a community of practice that provides help and support during the teaching of your distance educations course while also exploring a topic of interest related to your instruction.

Register for “DE Retreats” Here

Follow-up to “What Will You Carry Forward?”

We will all carry literal and figurative things forward from the experience of teaching in the last year. Often, these two blend together. For example, perhaps an instructor re-worked an attendance policy to accommodate a student who had to return home to attend to a family member. The policy and the memory behind the policy will both linger. Or, perhaps an instructor created a series of virtual labs and now has videos, supporting data, and Canvas assignments which they can use to help students who are not able to attend a lab in-person. Last spring, the Center hosted a discussion and posted a blog article called “The Things We’ll Carry” which prompted a lot of reflection about the literal and figurative items that instructors will carry with them from teaching last year. At the end of the discussion, there was interest among instructors for a practical workshop in the fall where instructors could see how their colleagues had adapted the lessons of the pandemic to their preparations for the new school year.

With apologies to Tim O’Brien for the continued use of his metaphor, the Center responded by hosting another workshop called “What will you carry forward?”. This workshop featured four instructors who did a “show and tell” about how they incorporated lessons from the pandemic into their teaching. They then fielded questions from the audience.

Now, through the magic of video technology, we are extending that workshop to those who were not able to attend the live event.

Below you will find the “show and tell” portions and, importantly, you will be able to interact with the videos as well because they are streaming through a service called PlayPosit, which allows instructors to add interactive elements to videos.

Please interact with these videos on multiple levels. First, learn from what the presenters have to say. Second, use the interactions in PlayPosit to engage more deeply with the content and with other people who have watched the videos. Finally, if you would like to use PlayPosit in your own class, please contact CATL at dle@uwgb.edu to have it added to your courses.

First presentation

Breeyawn Lybbert, who teaches in Natural and Applied Sciences, discusses her four-point plan for increasing equity in her science classes.

Second presentation

Next, Praneet Tiwari, who teaches in the Cofrin School of Business, discusses multiple strategies for incorporating students who participate in-person, at home, and asynchronously.

Third presentation

Third, Nichole LaGrow, distance education coordinator in CATL and associate lecturer in English, discusses how she extends G.R.A.C.E. to herself and students (Guided autonomy, Resources, Authentic assessments, Community, Expectations).

Fourth presentation

Finally, Jillian Jacklin, who teaches in Democracy and Justice Studies, synthesizes the previous presentations and discusses how she balances all the tips within the realities of teaching a heavy course load.