Distance Education Certificate and Course Enrollments (2022-23 AY)

CATL is excited to announce that we are continuing the Distance Education (DE) Certificate program that launched last year! Instructors developing or reworking a course for any of UWGB’s distance education modalities are encouraged to participate and complete the full certificate.

The Distance Education Certificate consists of three courses which act as progressive steps in a sequence. Instructors will earn a digital badge after completing the first and second courses in the series, and the Distance Education Certificate after completing the third course. Qualifying instructors will also earn stipends after completing the second and third courses in the sequence.

Course Availability, Deadlines, & Compensation

Course 1: Learning and Integrating Technology for Education (LITE) 101

  • All full-time instructors will be automatically enrolled in LITE 101 in a cohort based on academic unit. The course will remain open indefinitely, and there is no deadline for completion.
  • Instructors working toward the DE Certificate who complete LITE 101 will be able to enroll in LITE 201 the following semester.
  • LITE 101 is not tied to a stipend.

Course 2: LITE 201 (Trail Guides)

  • Registration for the Fall 2022 cohort of LITE 201 closed September 30, 2022.
  • There will be a future call for a Spring cohort of LITE 201 that will begin in February 2023 and run through May 12, 2023. Stay tuned for more info!
  • Full-time instructors who complete LITE 201 within the 2022-23 academic year will qualify for a $750 stipend.*

Course 3: LITE 301 (Retreats)

  • Registration for the Fall 2022 cohort of LITE 301 closed Thursday, Sept. 15, 2022.
  • An additional cohort will run in Spring 2023. Stay tuned for more info!
  • Full-time instructors who complete LITE 301 within the 2022-23 academic year will qualify for a $750 stipend.*

*To receive compensation, participants must receive approval from their unit chair. Instructors that have already met their maximum overload payment for the academic year do not qualify for compensation.

If you have questions about these courses, please contact CATL at catl@uwgb.edu. If you have questions about compensation or the payment process, please contact Human Resources at hr@uwgb.edu.

The first course in the DE Certificate series is called Learning and Integrating Technology for Education (LITE) 101. This self-paced course includes information about the different course modalities offered at UW-Green Bay, as well as the technologies you might use for teaching in each one, including in-person teaching. This course also serves as the foundation of the DE Certificate series because it provides an overview of our specific distance education modalities and the technologies that will help you to be successful in them.

LITE 201: Trail Guides (formerly just called Trail Guides) picks up where the first course leaves off. LITE 201 course centers on developing learning pathways for students. This self-paced course is for you if you would like to explore how to develop distance education courses more systematically. Through LITE 201, you will develop a module for either a synchronous (LITE 201S) or asynchronous (LITE 201A) distance education course. The third course is offered as a cohort-based, semester-long community of practice.

In LITE 301: Retreats (formerly just called Retreats), you will be encouraged to reflect on your own teaching practices. LITE 301 focuses on the process of using feedback, reflection, and scholarly teaching practices to refine classes. You will, for example, explore scholarship of teaching and learning (SoTL) literature relevant to issues in your course or to revisions or teaching innovations you are considering. You will also engage with several of your colleagues through synchronous and asynchronous activities designed to support your efforts in reflecting on and refining your teaching practices.

DE Certificate: LITE 101 Course

The first course in is the Distance Education Certificate series is called Learning and Integrating Technology for Education (LITE) 101. This self-paced course includes information about the different course modalities offered at UW-Green Bay, as well as the technologies you might use for teaching in each. LITE 101 will serve as the foundation of the DE Certificate series and provide the essentials you need to be successful on the path to building your course if you elect to continue onto the next courses in the DE Certificate series.

Prerequisites: None

Next course in the series: LITE 201: Trail Guides*

*If you completed either Foundations of Teaching with Canvas or Teaching with Technology Basecamp prior to Fall 2022, you already meet the pre-requisites for LITE 201; however, you are encouraged to use LITE 101 as a resource and/or complete the course for a badge because it includes information, such as course modalities, that the other two courses did not.

Badge

Every participant who successfully completes LITE 101 will earn a digital badge that you can include in your email signature or embed in online portfolios or resumes as evidence of your commitment to professional development!

LITE 101 badge with a lantern in a snowy landscape

Earning Criteria

    1. Reviewed technology that supports teaching in a specific modality, such as In Person or Virtual Classroom.
    2. Demonstrated how technology can enhance student learning experiences.
    3. Compared and contrasted the different technologies available at UWGB to support student learning experiences.
    4. Identified the technology available at UWGB that supports student learning experiences in their own courses.

FAQs

Click one of the questions below to expand the accordion.

All full-time instructors will be automatically enrolled in LITE 101 in cohorts based on academic unit. Check your email for an invite from University of Wisconsin Canvas or Instructure Canvas (notifications@instructure.com) and click the Get Started link to gain access to the course.

LITE 101 is a self-paced Canvas course organized by module, with one module for each of UWGB’s course modalities. To complete the course, you will need to pass six multiple-choice quizzes with a score of at least 80% or higher and complete the final in-course feedback survey. Doing so will also grant you a digital badge.
Unlike Foundations and Basecamp, LITE 101 covers in detail the various teaching modalities offered at UWGB. Even though there is some content overlap between Foundations, Basecamp, and LITE 101, the resources on course modalities and integrating technology across all modalities will be insightful for instructors who have completed one of these previous self-paced introductory courses.
If you completed Foundations of Teaching with Canvas and/or Teaching with Technology Basecamp prior to Fall 2022, you already meet the prerequisites to take the second course in the DE Certificate sequence, LITE 201: Trail Guides. If you have not completed either of these courses, you will need to complete LITE 101 to continue in the DE Certificate sequence.

The DE Certificate consists of three consecutive courses: LITE 101, LITE 201: Trail Guides, and LITE 301: Retreats. LITE 101 is replacing Basecamp in the certificate series as of Fall 2022. Learn more about the Distance Education Certificate.

LITE 101 is not being offered for compensation, however, the stipends for LITE 201: Trail Guides and LITE 301: Retreats have been increased to $750 each for the 2022-23 academic year. As a result, instructors will earn more for those two classes ($1500 total) than they used to for the three-class sequence ($1150).

Yes! All UWGB staff and faculty are welcome to take the LITE 101 course. We hope this course can be a resource to help educators at our institution familiarize themselves with UWGB's modalities and the technologies that support them, including Canvas. If you are not a full-time instructor but would still like to be enrolled in LITE 101, please email CATL (CATL@uwgb.edu).

 

Questions?

If you have any questions about LITE 101 or the Distance Education Certificate in general, please contact CATL (CATL@uwgb.edu).

“Required” Reading: Guiding Students Through Your Course with Canvas Module Requirements

When provided with a task, almost invariably, some students will overlook or ignore provided instructions, skip past foundational lessons, and end up taking their own “creative” approach to completing it. While some students can find success going their own way, when a student misses instructions, they often end up making life harder for themselves and their instructor. When teaching with Canvas, you have access to tools that can help add order to how students progress through your lessons, instructions, and assignments. When you organize and present your content in modules, you gain the ability to add requirements that require each student to view and/or interact with specified course items before they can progress and access items positioned further down in the course module order. You can ensure that your students’ route to an assignment goes through the important scaffolding pages. While they are not a panacea and should be applied with careful thought so that they act as a guide and not an unnecessary obstacle for students, implementing module requirements can help prevent students from starting a task before they have engaged with preparatory lessons and activities.

Forcing top-to-bottom progression within a module

Within a single module you can use requirements to force students to progress through that module in top-to-bottom order. These requirements can help enforce that students, for example, view a page with important instructions before they can access and submit to an assignment. To set up a module with requirements that students must complete in order, click the module header’s Options icon, then click Edit to open the Edit Module Settings menu. In this menu, select + Add Requirement to begin adding your first requirement to the module and reveal additional options. Enabling the Students must move through requirements in sequential order checkbox will lock each module item until all the requirements above that item in that module have been completed. This forces students to work through the module requirements in top-to-bottom order. You then need to add requirements to the module. You will need to add one requirement for each module item students need to complete in order.

You add a requirement by selecting + Add Requirement, and then you configure a requirement by making selections in two drop-down menus. In the left drop-down menu, select the module item to which you want to add the requirement. In the right drop-down menu, select how the students must complete that requirement. Depending on the type of the module item, this second drop-down menu will show several options (click each option below to expand it and reveal suggested uses):

Only requires students to open and view the module item. This is a simple requirement well-suited for course Pages.

Requires students to open the item and then click a Mark as done button at the bottom of the page. If you use this type of requirement, make sure to provide students with instructions for marking items as done. Students can overlook the button and feel stuck if they’ve never encountered this requirement before.

Only used for Discussions and Pages that are set to allow students to make edits. Students will satisfy this requirement once they have posted a reply in the Discussion or saved an edit to the Page. Avoid picking this requirement for pages which can only be edited by Teachers, as students will not be able to complete the requirement.

Requires the student to make an Assignment submission, make a reply in a graded Discussion, or complete a Quiz attempt.

Requires students to earn at least the minimum score on the graded item, which you designate when setting up the requirement. This type of requirement works well with Quizzes that allow multiple or unlimited attempts.

Adding a requirement for each module item that contains important information or a required task will ensure students engage with the content in your intended order.

Locking a module until the previous module has been completed

Requirements can also be leveraged to lock an entire module until the student completes the requirements of one or more modules above it. Controlling module-to-module progression is done with the additional step of adding module prerequisites. You can add one or more prerequisites to a module through the same Edit Module Settings menu where you add requirements. When adding a module prerequisite, you select an entire module that appears above the module you are currently editing. Adding one or more prerequisites to a module will prevent a student from accessing all content in that module until they have completed the requirements of each module that is set as a prerequisite. Any module that is selected as a prerequisite must contain at least one requirement—Canvas needs to know the criteria for completing that module and satisfying the prerequisite. A module that is selected as a prerequisite but has no requirements will have no effect on course progression.

Screenshot of the Edit Module Settings menu: “Module 1” is selected as a prerequisite for “Module 2”
Edit Module Settings menu: “Module 1” is selected as a prerequisite for “Module 2”

Here is an example of how you can set this up in a course. Let’s say that the content in Module 1 is so fundamental to the content in Module 2 that you want to prevent students from viewing anything in Module 2 until they’ve fully engaged with the content in Module 1. Imagine that both Module 1 and Module 2 contain a Page, a Discussion, and an Assignment. Your first step in forcing students to complete Module 1 before accessing Module 2 is to edit Module 1 and add three requirements:

  1. Module 1 Page – view the item
  2. Module 1 Discussion – contribute to the page
  3. Module 1 Assignment – submit the assignment
Screenshot of the the Edit Module Settings menu with the example requirements for Module 1 set up
Edit Module Settings menu with the example requirements for Module 1 set up

Adding these requirements tells Canvas how to determine whether a student has completed Module 1: a student has completed Module 1 once they have viewed the Page, made a reply in the Discussion, and submitted to the Assignment. The next step is to edit Module 2 and add a prerequisite, selecting Module 1 as the prerequisite module. That is all that is needed to force students to complete Module 1 before accessing Module 2; it is not necessary to add any requirements to Module 2 unless you plan to use Module 2 as a prerequisite in a subsequent module. You may still want to add requirements to Module 2 just for the additional visual guidance and feedback they provide to students.

Screenshot of two example modules with requirements and prerequisites set up
Two example modules with requirements and prerequisites set up

Use Cases

There are many creative ways you can leverage module requirements and prerequisites to exercise control over the flow of your course. Here are a few illustrative use cases (click each to expand it):

You can require students to acknowledge the policies and essential information contained in your syllabus before they can access the rest of your course by creating a syllabus quiz and setting up module requirements and prerequisites. First, add a quiz to the “Introduction” module at or near the top of your Canvas course and add any number of objective questions to test your student’s knowledge of important syllabus content. Set up the quiz to allow for unlimited attempts and to keep the highest score. Next, edit your “Introduction” module to add a requirement that students score at least X points on the Syllabus Quiz. “X” can be whichever minimum score you deem good enough to allow progress through the course. Finally, edit each subsequent module of the course to add the “Introduction” module as a prerequisite. This setup requires students to take (and retake) the Syllabus Quiz until they score at least X points before they can access any of the content after the “Introduction” module.

You can set up requirements within a single module to have students complete a pretest quiz before going through the module content and then take a post-test quiz after completing the module content. This process could help you evaluate the effectiveness of your instruction and/or apply a metacognitive approach to help students gain awareness of their learning and gaps in their knowledge. To create this setup, add a pretest quiz at or near the top of a module and a post-test quiz at or near the bottom of the module and put lesson content and additional formative assessment activities in between the two quizzes. Edit the module to add a requirement to each module item (including requirements to “submit” to each of the two quizzes) and enable the Students must move through requirements in sequential order checkbox. Students will need to progress through the module in top-to-bottom order, first taking the pretest at the top of the module, then engaging with the content, and finally taking the post-test at the bottom of the module. You can set your pretest quiz to be a “Practice Quiz” so that scores are not added to the gradebook.

Even if you don’t need to force a linear progression through your course modules, adding requirements to your modules automatically adds visual feedback that helps to communicate expectations to students and helps students track their own progress through the course. Any module item that is used in a module requirement will display its requirement underneath its title within the module. This is a simple automatic piece of visual feedback that can help students keep track of their tasks. Students also see additional indicators of their progress. After a student completes a requirement, the module item is marked with a green checkmark to signal completion. If a student has started a module but has not yet completed all its requirements, that module’s header is marked with a red circle; once the student completes all of a module’s requirements, this indicator changes to a green checkmark. Instructors can monitor student progress through module requirements by clicking the View Progress button located above the first module of the course.

The visual feedback provided by module requirements adds a light element of gamification to your course, turning each module into a list of sub-missions to be completed. Requirements can be further leveraged to add game-based learning elements to your courses. Use requirements to set minimum scores on low-stakes quizzes that allow multiple attempts and unlock harder “levels” of your course once a student achieves the target score. You can further add the Canvas Badges (Badgr) integration to your course to award “achievements” for the completion of modules and (optionally) enable an anonymous leaderboard to foster competitive motivation among students.

Conclusion (Prerequisite: Read All Above Sections)

We hope this blog post has given you a sense of how and when you can use module requirements in your Canvas courses. When used thoughtfully, module requirements are an effective tool for encouraging students to move through your course in the sequence you intended. Recall from your past teaching that assignment or a module in a course where students got off-track because they somehow managed to miss vital information that was right there for them. Next time you teach that course, try employing requirements to funnel students through that important supporting content before they can start work on the assignment. If you have an idea for employing module requirements in your Canvas course and would like to discuss how to best put it together, please reach out to catl@uwgb.edu or request a CATL consultation to meet with a member of the CATL team!

Call for Teaching Enhancement Grant Proposals (Due Monday, Nov 14, 2022)

The Instructional Development Council (IDC) is accepting applications for Teaching Enhancement Grants (TEG), through support from the Center for the Advancement of Teaching and Learning. The Teaching Enhancement Grant program is designed to support professional development activities that will enhance a faculty member’s teaching skills or result in the development of innovative teaching strategies.

Faculty and instructional academic staff whose primary responsibility is teaching for the current academic year are strongly encouraged to apply! Applications are due Monday, Nov. 14, 2022. Click the button below for full details.

 

Writing Effective and Reflective Teaching Philosophies (Oct. 21, 9:30 a.m.)

Teaching philosophies. We may think of them when required to write one for a job application or promotion file—or maybe you haven’t touched your teaching philosophy since graduate school. But there are many reasons educators can benefit from writing—and revisiting—a teaching philosophy. Teaching philosophies help us to reflect upon and articulate our ideas about what makes for effective teaching. And doing so helps to ensure that what we do in our classes is consistent with those beliefs and promotes student learning. In this workshop, we will share some basics of developing a teaching philosophy, including the components that can effectively illustrate your values as a teacher and the details of how you’ve enacted and evolved your craft. Join us for our open exchange of ideas this Friday, October 21, from 9:30 – 10:30 a.m., in the CATL Conference Room (CL 405) or via Zoom.