Math Problems

“I’m just bad a math.”
“I’m not going into a STEM major, why do I need all of this math?
“I’m not going to use Algebra, Geometry, and Calculus etc….in real life.”

My high school counselor sat me down my junior year for selecting my senior year classes and informed me that even though I had taken the mandatory three years of college prep math (Algebra, Geometry, and Advanced Algebra- actually I took Algebra 1 twice, but that’s a story for another time) it was in my best interest to take Pre-Calculus my senior year. As you can imagine, I was likely giving him the look your math challenged students give you that reads: “Seriously?”  He went on to say things that, in hindsight, rang very true:

  1. Math is harder in college. Take as much as you can in high school to avoid as much math as you can in college. (Pretty sure he only gave this advice to people like me, not to the STEM majors.)
  2. Math Placement Exam: The more math you take in high school the better you will do on the math placement exam.
  3. Lesson for Life: If you don’t take Math your senior year, you will be out of practice. It’s like training for a sport, you can’t just take a year off and expect to walk onto the field and perform like you’ve been training for that year.
  4. Math teaches you to think differently. It took until senior year of college for me to realize this was true. Solving real world problems, when “adulting”, requires us to use all the tools in our toolbox and forces us to look at problems from different angles. At UW-Green Bay we call this interdisciplinary learning. Math give us skills to better understand cause and effect, equations are common when you are diagraming a project, problem or potential solutions and we don’t even realize how often we use math logic in our daily lives to get us where we need to go, when we need to get there.

What I’ve learned while working in Admissions:

  • Students who take the 4th year of college prep math before attending UWGB are more likely to graduate.
  • When we review applications for admission and a student is on the bubble for admission, having taken the 4th year of college prep math is a plus factor.
  • People who don’t take the math seriously their senior year or don’t take the Wisconsin Math Placement Test seriously are disappointed in that choice when it comes to freshmen registration. I’ve seen this first-hand countless times.
  • The Early Math Placement Tool, which is free for schools, is a good idea to get students ready to take math seriously their senior year. https://exams.wisc.edu/empt/home.php

I didn’t get the chance to let my school counselor know that he was right about math. You are right to have this conversation with your students. Thank you for having these conversations. We might not get kids like me to embrace math, but I’m hoping we can help them understand its value.

About the author: Jennifer Jones is the Director of Admissions at UW-Green Bay. Jen has 17 years of experience in higher education. She resides in Green Bay with her husband, two small children, and energetic dog.

College Applications: Advice from Advisors

Applying to college is an exciting (and stressful) time of a student’s life. The application process can be overwhelming and sometimes students might wish they could know what goes through an Admission Advisor’s head while they are reviewing applications. We have gathered some insight from UW-Green Bay’s admissions team on what they think are the most important factors in college admissions.

Let’s meet our experts, Admissions Advisors from UW-Green Bay:

Ryan Stewart, Admissions Advisor for Wisconsin Students
      Fun Fact: Ryan’s favorite superhero is Spider-Man!!!!!!!

Marisa Leza, Bilingual Admissions Advisor
     Fun Fact: Marisa’s favorite movie is Dumb and Dumber.

 Katy Jarosz, International Recruitment Specialist
     Fun Fact: Katy lived in Wuhan, China for two years before coming to Green Bay.

 Bridget Derge, Assistant Director of Admissions for Recruitment
      Fun Fact: Bridget’s favorite food is Dove chocolates.

What do you wish you knew about college Admissions?

Many student may be asking, what is the most important factor in admission decisions? Katy Jarosz, UW-Green Bay’s International Recruitment Specialist, explained that it would be very hard to narrow down the most important factor of in admission decision, but “one of the most insightful parts is getting to read students’ personal statements, since the personal statement is the only part of the application where we get to hear students talk about themselves in their own words.”

Marisa Leza, UW-Green Bay’s Bilingual Admissions Advisor, agreed that she thinks a very important factor is the personal statement because “it provides a better insight of who the candidate is.” She also really enjoys reading each and every student’s individual story, rather than just looking at the numbers involved with admissions.

Even though we may not be able to read Admission Advisor’s minds, many students can be assured that it isn’t just about the ACT score and GPA. Admission Advisors truly do care about you, who you are, and who you will be as a student on their campus. Be sure that your essay expresses just that.

Personal Statement: Where to Begin?

When it’s time to think about writing your personal statement, or application essay, many students are unsure where to begin. It’s important to keep in mind that Admission advisors are looking for your story, along with all the ups and downs that got you to where you are in life.

Don’t just focus on the shortcomings. As Ryan Stewart, UW-Green Bay Admission Advisor, states, “You don’t need a sap story to make a great essay. But at the same time, write about things that you are passionate about to allow our advisors to walk in your shoes.” It’s important to let the admissions team see how you’ve dealt with the setbacks in your story and what drives you to keep focusing on your academic goals.

Bridget Derge, UW-Green Bay’s Assistant Director of Admissions, suggests, “Address the areas that make you cringe. If you wish there was something on your transcript that you could erase, the admissions review committee probably does, too. So talk about it.” This way you are able to discuss the hurdles and what you did to overcome those setbacks in your life. The admissions team wants to be able to see how you got to where you are and how you are going to continue to be successful in college and after graduation.

Comprehensive Review? What’s that about?

UW-Green Bay Admission Advisors refer to giving each and every application “comprehensive review,” but do we even know what that exactly means? Comprehensive review refers to applications being thoroughly reviewed with every admission factor, including transcripts, ACT or SAT scores, personal statements, letters of recommendation, and college prep courses.

As Bridget stated, “The application statement also allows students to share information about what else occupies their time aside from being a student and how they balance those things along with their academics. We want to learn about what goals they have established for their future and how they plan to achieve them. We want to know as much about the student as we can [to make an informed admissions decision]. We want to know who they are as a high school student and who they want to become as a UW-Green Bay student.” Therefore, include your involvement throughout your academic career and everything that got you to where you are in your life. This will help show the admissions team how you will fit at the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay.

Important of Extra-Curricular Activities

You always hear people talk about the importance of extra-curricular activities and being involved, but knowing why that matters to admission advisors is also important. Katy explains that being involved in extra-curricular activities shows admission advisors that you “are still able to maintain good grades, demonstrate you are responsible, and that you have great time management skills.” Bridget also added that extra-curricular activities are “a great way to see leadership skills being developed and a student’s potential to grow.” These are all very important factors that show if a student will have great dedication to their studies; however, the most important factor is time management because it shows if a student can balance their commitments during college.

Additional Advice – What to do now?

Below is additional advice from all of the Admission Advisors. View their advice as a great tool to help you with applying and getting accepted to UW-Green Bay, but remember that the door is always open to UW-Green Bay admission. They are there to help you and want you to become successful. Take advantage of their help and assistance to become a successful student and UW-Green Bay graduate. All of their advice includes things that you can start now. The earlier you start, the better the chances are of finding the right college and being prepared to start your studies.

Ryan: “Work hard all the way through high school, don’t wait until your senior year to kick it into gear.”

Marisa: “Tour as many schools as you possibly can, it is not just applying, but also visiting the schools. It will provide a better description of what the school has to offer. Take advantage of all the college prep programs and get involved to prepare for college.”

Katy: “Don’t be afraid to contact your admissions counselors! We’re here to help you through the whole process, and the best part of our jobs is when we get to meet with or talk with students and help them decide if this is the right school for them. Feel free to ask lots of questions – we’re here to help!”

Bridget: “Ask for help when you need it. With admission applications, with financial aid questions. People who work in higher education do so because they want to provide access to college for students. We are here to help. Take advantage of that. We are here for you and to support you.”

To contact advisors at the UW-Green Bay Office of Admissions, send us a message at uwgb@uwgb.edu or call 920-465-2111.

This post was prepared and written by Carli Meyer, UW-Green Bay Student and Admissions Intern. Carli is a business major form Oconto, Wisconsin, who transferred to UW-Green Bay in 2016.

The Applicant Statement Uncovered

Maybe I’ve watched too many CSI or Law & Order-like shows, but I seriously believe I’m like an investigator when I’m looking at college applications. I am always looking for evidence of success.  When reviewing applications, the first thing we review is a student’s high school record. We are paying special attention to the types of rigorous courses, and the quantity of those courses, that the student has taken during all four years of high school. We also look at overall performance and trends over the entire high school record. In investigator speak: discovering any patterns or abnormalities.

We do use the ACT score to look at another credible source of information about a student’s ability to be successful in the classroom. Is the ACT consistent with the evidence we found on the transcript? If not, we need to dig further.

The application itself gives us a ton of information about the student outside of the classroom: activities, awards, honors, and employment help round out the student’s profile. One piece of the application (which I love) that stresses students out the most is the dreaded application statement. The application statement gives us an opportunity to learn about the student, who they are, what’s important to them, what they have learned from their high school experience, and why they are ready to be successful at UW-Green Bay.

I’m going to let you in on an Admissions Director secret: we want to admit people to our universities. We don’t like denying anyone this opportunity, but we have to do our best to ensure there is enough evidence from high school, or their transfer institution, to show they are going to be successful when they enroll. If you ever are worried about admissibility to UWGB, please reach out to our office. We have a team of people who want to help guide students to UW-Green Bay.

What makes a great application statement?

Authenticity- tell us about you and your experiences. Tell us about what you’re passionate about, what you’ve learned from high school- successes you’re proud of and struggles that taught life lessons. We want to hear about the stories behind the grades, classes and ACT scores. We are looking for evidence that you’re ready to be successful in college. Success in college is not getting into your desired University, it is taking advantage of opportunities and persevering through four of the most life transforming years of your life until you graduate from college. Those are the skills we are looking for.

Write well- Proof, spell check, and have someone else read it before you hit send.

Don’t make excuses- We all struggle sometimes. Things happen in high school that impact our ability to be successful. These are opportunities to learn, grow and find a way though. These are the same skills you need to be successful in college. Tell us what happened, but focus on the solution or resolution. What did you learn or how are you being supported now and finding success?

For more info about how to make your application essay great, contact our Admissions advisors at uwgb@uwgb.edu or 920-465-2111.

 

About the author: Jennifer Jones is the Director of Admissions at UW-Green Bay. Jen has 17 years of experience in higher education, and has read a lot of application essays. She resides in Green Bay with her husband, two small children, and energetic dog.

Snapchat Q&A Day Inspiration

Join us on August 16 for Snapchat Q&A Day!

All day we will be answering questions sent to us on Snapchat. Looking for inspiration on what to ask? Here is some inspiration:

  • What are the work out facilities like?
  • Do you have a club for _____?
  • Can I bring a car to campus?
  • Will I need a printer?
  • Do you offer ____ as a major?
  • What is the average class size?
  • What are top majors?
  • What is there to do in Green Bay?
  • How can I make friends?

Are you an admitted student joining us in fall?
Here’s some questions you may have:

  • What should I NOT pack?
  • Can I pack ____?
  • Is Orientation mandatory?
  • What school supplies should I bring?
  • What am I forgetting to bring?
  • Can I bring my dog?
  • How do I get a job on campus?

We can’t wait to answer your questions on Snapchat.
Add UW-Green Bay on Snapchat today: uwgreenbay

Graduate from college with less debt…do your homework!

Congrats! Those first steps of writing essays, paying application fees and sending transcripts are done. Phew! Now you can sit back, relax and wait for those acceptance packets to start rolling in, right?  Wait, don’t start relaxing yet! We know you are the type of incoming freshmen who wants to graduate with less debt—so listen up. Now is the perfect time to begin growing your understanding of the Financial Aid world.  We are here to guide you through the months between applying to college and receiving Federal Financial Aid to go to college.  So what can you do now to help better understand the “ticket price” of your future education?

Step 1) Do your research! –Know how much it currently costs a student to attend the Universities you’re interested in. Keep in mind amounts for the 2013-14 academic year have not been set. You should be concerned over the four direct costs to attending college. They are:

1.      Tuition and Fees

2.      Housing

3.      Food Plan (board)

4.      Books

See you’re already more financially aware. Baby steps!

Step 2) Now take those totals and use them to help you figure out how much you may need to pay out of pocket. Again, keeping in mind that the cost of attendance you researched is for this academic year and will likely increase. You can calculate an estimated Financial Aid Award using the FAFSA4Caster: https://fafsa.ed.gov/FAFSA/app/f4cForm

Remember this is not your official application for student aid. You can begin completing your FAFSA, or FREE Application for Federal Student Aid, beginning on January 1, 2013. This application will be your access to Federal and State aid including grants and student loans.

Step 3) Now that you’ve seen an estimated guess regarding the amount you may need to pay out of pocket, let’s talk SCHOLARSHIPS! Almost all scholarship applications are due six to nine months prior to the award year they are for.  Time is of the essence! Let’s get started:

  • Contact your prospective colleges to learn about the institutional scholarships available. Most will be determined by academic criteria (GPA & ACT score). Some may require a separate application form and others may use the admissions application.
  • Set up a meeting with your HS guidance counselor!  Many high schools have generous alumni who have set up scholarship funds.  These are worth your while because most likely only students from the school district are eligible!
  • Check with community businesses and organizations such as credit unions, local grocery stores, or others like your local Red Cross. 
  • Use search engines, like www.studentaid.ed.gov, provided by the U.S. Dept of Labor to search for available outside scholarships.

Accepted to UWGB-Now What?

Phew, getting in was the first big step toward coming to college. What’s next you ask? Well, we have tried to make it as simple as we can. We have a checklist for freshman and transfer students entering UWGB in Fall of 2012.

Also, join our UWGB class of 2016 on Facebook to get connected and ask questions of your fellow classmates.

Once again, congratulations on your acceptance and GO PHOENIX!

Concert Choir and Chamber Singers Deliver Holiday Cheer

UW-Green Bay music will present the sounds of the season Tuesday, Dec. 6 during a Concert Choir and Chamber Singers performance held at 7:30 p.m. in the Cofrin Family Hall (mainstage) at the Weidner Center for the Performing Arts.

UW-Green Bay assistant Profs. Randall Meder (Concert Choir) and Courtney Sherman (Chamber Singers) will conduct the concert, which is UW-Green Bay music’s 16th of the 2011-12 season. Accompanists Michael Stefanek (piano and organ) and Mary Slavek (piano) will accompany the singers.

Tuesday’s varied program includes such holiday favorites as “Deck the Halls” and “O Come, O Come, Emmanuel,” in addition to love-inspired pieces like “Liebesgarten” from composer Robert Schumann and “A Red Red Rose” by composer James Mulholland. The concert will conclude with the energetic “Ev’ry Time I Feel the Spirit” (William Dawson) and classic “Hallelujah” (Ludwig van Beethoven).

Tickets for the concert are $7 for adults, and $5 for students and seniors. Information is available at www.uwgb.edu/music/events.asp. The Weidner Center is located on the UW-Green Bay campus, 2420 Nicolet Drive, Green Bay.

UW-Green Bay Chamber Singers personnel are as follows: Ryan Braatz, Angel Campbell, Angie Danowski, Nicole Duhaime, Justin Foth, Bradley D. Klinger, Kayla Loret, Mark Osterberg, Joerge Schmelzer, Lydia Schneider, Tori Schuurmans, Amanda Sherman and Katherine Wilson.

UW-Green Bay Concert Choir personnel are as follows: Soprano: Meghan Baker, Nikita Cantable, Sarah Clark, Bryanne Fish, Katelyn Junak, Rachal Kennedy, Kelsey Landrath, Rasami Moua, Jami Pilger, Melissa Reisdorf, Alyssa Welnetz; Alto: Sara Bernardy, Sarah Chayer, Rebekah Cochrane, Amber Jagodzinski, Nicole Phillips, Meta Stern, Hilary Thums, Alyssa Weber, Ashley Wisneski; Tenor: Nathan Fett, Michael Kinscher, Shaquille Pabst, Tyler Samolinski, Austin Tisch, Logan Witthuhn, Pheng Yang; Bass: Benjamin Anderson, Avery Bundgaard, Justin Foth, Gatlin Grimm and Phillip Johnson.

 

Next up for UWGB Music:

Percussion and Hand Drumming Ensembles

December 9, 7:30, University Theatre

Unnecessary Farce Brings Necessary Laughter to UWGB

They say time spent laughing is time well spent. Well, then UWGB’s production of Unnecessary Farce by Paul Slade Smith is a far cry from a waste of time. This hilarious show will have you bursting out in raucous laughter probably unsuitable for a public venue, but when the whole house is with you, nobody cares. That is the gift of UWGB’s Unnecessary Farce: two hours where nothing matters but tickling your funny bone. And it delivers.

The seven student cast, directed by Laura Riddle, does not have an easy time of it in Farce. Backstage at intermission is a sight to see, with cast members fighting for breath and more than just a little sweat on their costumes, but onstage, it looks effortless and natural. Well, maybe not effortless, but very believable. With eight doors (which are the only set pieces that work harder than the actors), more than a few quick costume changes, guns, handcuffs, dialects both accurate and absurd, and a large plate of donuts, comedic timing is earned in this show and the cast will not disappoint.

Andrew Delaurelle and Marta Knodle play less than competent cops using an attractive Accountant (played by Katie Sawyer) as bait to catch the Mayor (played delightfully by Ross Christian) in an embezzling scheme. Add his wandering wife (played by Noel Fricke), a security agent (Matthew Harris in a comedic bullseye) and Todd (played by Derek Knabenbaur with a flawless dialect and a fearless disposition) as a Scottish…well, I won’t give away too much here. The more surprises in Unnecessary Farce, the better.

This production has earned a rave review from the Green Bay Press Gazette, who accurately called it “sexy, fast, and ridiculous”. Read the review at http://www.greenbaypressgazette.com/article/20111114/GPG04/111140472/UWGB-Theatre-s-Unnecessary-Farce-big-hoot

Unnecessary Farce runs this weekend, Thursday, Friday, and Saturday at 7:30 pm in UWGB’s University Theatre. Buy tickets by visiting the UTIC in the University Union, calling them at (920)465-2400, or online at http://www.uwgb.edu/theatre/season/index.html

To watch a preview of Unnecessary Farce with insight from the director and cast members, click here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UUxZpbVrhvk

[title of show] is a First for UWGB

Natalie Vanden Heuvel, Mike Roderique, Ross Christian, and Chelsea Crevcoure

This weekend marks the long awaited run [title of show]. This production marks the opening of the UWGB 2011-2012 Theatre season, being the first of two studio (student-directed) projects selected for this year, and the only fully mounted student-directed production. [title of show] is also the first student-directed musical in UWGB’s history. A large and daunting undertaking for directors Kyle R. Pingel and Molly LeCaptain.

The road to [title of show], or [tos] to its loyal fanbase, started with Pingel and LeCaptain, two theatre majors and good friends, developing individual directing projects. LeCaptain, a longtime [tos] fan and musical theatre major had the show in mind from the start. Having a four person cast and minimal set, she knew it was an ideal candidate for a studio production. When the two decided to join forces, a new directing team was born, both Pingel and LeCaptain being credited as co-directors, with LeCaptain focusing on musical direction.

The show itself presents an overtly simple (or painfully complicated) premise: the show centers around two guys writing a musical, about two guys writing a musical, about two guys writing a musical. No plot lines to be crossed there. While the plot may get complicated, the cast consists of only two guys, two girls, and an accompanist, and the set is made up of four mismatched and lonely chairs. Add in a cornucopia of theatre and pop culture references (and a slew of administrative confusion as to what the show is actually called), and you have a hilarious, nostalgic yet utterly contemporary musical.

[title of show] runs this weekend only, with shows Thursday, Friday, and Saturday (22-24) at 7:30 in the Jean Weidner Theatre, all 100% free of admission. Pingel, LeCaptain, along with their brave and talented cast consisting of Mike Roderique, Ross Christian, Chelsea Crevcoure, Natalie Vanden Heuvel, and Richard S. Perry, hope you come and enjoy the music, the laughter, and the fun of [title of show].

Back to School Time

Can you feel it? The excitement is building. In one week, the entire freshmen class will be coming to campus to move in to housing and attend FOCUS Orientation. This is my favorite time of year. People are checking out where their classrooms are, getting their books and materials for class, meeting new people and running into old friends. Everything is building to the first day of class.

The first day of class is full of possibilities…just like the students entering college for the first time. How much you put into a class, reading, homework, projects etc…is directly related to how much you get out of it. The experience is richer when you put more energy into it. The same is true of college.

Attending classes and getting good grades is only part of the experience, to fully experience college, you need to get involved, meet new people, and try things you’ve never tried. Internships, research opportunities, jobs; they don’t just fall in your lap, you need to seek them out. Develop relationships with your faculty and staff. You never know when you might need that connection.

Get involved in clubs and organizations that matter to you. Give your energy to making the world a better place in whatever way works for you! Make the most of your college experience. Trust me when I say, it goes quickly. Savor each moment and make it count.