Spring 2014 Semester

This spring, I am teaching Hist. 205, “U.S. History from 1600 to 1865” (online) and Hist. 312: The Early American Republic.  My scheduled office hours are Tuesday and Thursday, from 12:30 to 1:30, and Friday from 1:00 to 1:30. My office is located in Theatre Hall 377. No appointment is needed. For more information about these courses and my scholarly work, see the links to the right. (Feel free to email me at voelkerd@uwgb.edu with questions.)

Best regards,

David Voelker

Associate Professor of Humanistic Studies and History

Fall 2013 Semester

This fall, I am teaching Hist. 205, “U.S. History from 1600 to 1865,” and Hist. 302, “Problems in American Thought” (on the topic of wilderness).  My scheduled office hours are Tuesday and Thursday, from noon to 1:00, and Friday from 1:00 to 1:30. My office is located in Theatre Hall 377. No appointment is needed. For more information about these courses and my scholarly work, see the links to the right. (Feel free to email me at voelkerd@uwgb.edu with questions.)

Best regards,

David Voelker

Associate Professor of Humanistic Studies and History

Instructions for Using Google Docs

Google Docs is an online word processor that you can use for free with a Google account.  With Google Docs, you can have access to your files from any computer with an internet connection.  You can export a Google Docs file in MS Word format.

If you don’t have a Google account, you can sign up for one here.

If you already have a Google account (for gmail, etc.), simply login and use the “more” link at the top of the Google page to access “Documents.”

For additional tips on using Google Docs, see the links below.  –DV

Handbook for Writing Historical Essays

Over the years, I have created quite a few handouts on reading and writing for my history students.  This year, I collected these documents into a Handbook for Writing Historical Essays, which I assign in my upper-level history courses.  The handbook is available for a few dollars (the cost of production) in the Phoenix Bookstore.  Students may also download a pdf version of the handbook by clicking here.  The handbook has been updated for the Fall 2013 semester.

Here is the table of contents:

1. Preface: Why I Assign Essays in this Course

2. Reading Historical Scholarship

3. Reading Notes Template

4. Plagiarism and How To Avoid It

5. Using Textual Evidence

6. Using Footnotes

7. Writing Rules

8. So What? How to Write With a Thesis

9. Beware of the Pseudo-Thesis

10. The Work of Topic Sentences

11. Writing with a Thesis: A Flowchart

12. Essay Rubric

Many of these handouts were posted separately on my online handout library; for the sake of simplicity of updating, I have removed the individual handouts in favor of supplying this collection.

Best,

DV