Title:Episode 60: Super-Villains on the Couch (with Bryan Carr and Chuck Rybak)

This special LIVE episode was part of the Brown County Library’s 3rd annual Comic-Con! In this cross-over episode our host, Ryan Martin, joins forces with Bryan Carr from Serious Fun and Dr. Chuck Rybak to talk about some of your favorite super-villains. Listen in as they discuss the psychology, mental health, and background of super-villains such as Lex Luthor, Killmonger, and the infamous pairing of the Joker and Harley Quinn!
 
Other links:
            Listen at Stitcher
            Listen at SoundCloud
            Listen at iTunes
            Listen at GooglePlay
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Title: Episode 59: Schizophrenia and the Brain

Info: In this episode, Drs. Ryan Martin and Jason Cowell, along with student guest Alie Klein, talk Schizophrenia. Listen in as they discuss symptoms of Schizophrenia, genetic and environmental influences, and the neural underpinnings of clinical disorders.
Other links:
           Listen at Stitcher
           Listen at SoundCloud
           Listen at iTunes
            Listen at GooglePlay
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Five Ways to Absolutely Crush Registration Next Week

Want to do registration right?  Do these 5 things and you’ll own it.

  1. Know Your Registration Time Slot and Plan Ahead: Spring registration starts on October 29th, but not everyone gets to register right at 8:00 am that Monday morning.  Most of you will need to wait until your specific enrollment appointment time.  Find your enrollment appointment time (along with some other tips) by following the instructions on this page.
  2. Understand SIS: Want to know what General Education Courses you still need to take?  Wondering if you have taken all the courses for your minor?  There’s an easy way to answer those questions, and it’s to take a look at your SIS report.  If you aren’t sure how to find or read your SIS report, this 4-minute tutorial will give you the basics. That said, the best way to figure out what classes you need to take is to meet with your faculty advisor (the name of that person can also be found on SIS) or with peer advisors from the Psychology and Human Development Student Success Center.
  3. Know About the Human Development and Psychology Want Ads and Handshake (through Career Services):  Interested in doing a research or teaching assistantship and want to know what is available?  Psychology faculty often post information about research assistantships, teaching assistantships, and internships on the Human Development and Psychology Want Ads.  Additionally, many community internships are posted on Handshake through UWGB Career Services (check out this video on PRO).  Make sure to check there too.
  4. Stats First… Then Research Methods: And this will serve as our semesterly reminder to that you need to meet your statistics and research methods requirements early because research methods (PSYCH 300) is a prerequisite for about half of our upper-level psych courses.  We recommend you take COMM SCI 205 (Social Science Statistics) as soon as you can and take PSYCH 300 (Research Methods in Psychology) the semester after that.  This will open the door for you to take most of our other upper-level courses when you’re done.
  5. Visit the Student Success Center: All these tips are good… but, honestly, if you really want to crush registration, you should meet with a peer advisor from the Psychology and Human Development Student Success Center.  He or she is the best person to talk you through registration, and help you make sure you are on track to graduate.  You can schedule an appointment with the center at their website.
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Featured Student: Eddiberto Flores

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  1. When are you graduating? Graduation is dependent on what I will be doing the summer of 2019. If I take summer courses, I will be graduating in December of 2019. If I enter a research program, I will be graduating in May of 2020.
  2. What are your career plans? I am working towards playing an active role in researching varying therapies that yield long-lasting results. I have carried a fascination with conscious expansion ever since I learned how to be a student of all and any experiences. Entering a graduate program centralized around consciousness is a key component as to why I pursued an undergraduate degree initially. Attaining a position in clinical therapy where I would have the opportunity to teach others how to problem solve and empower themselves would be a wholesome career and use of my life.
  3. Why did you major in psychology? I majored in psychology to get a better understanding of myself through learning about the underlying processes throughout my development that has shaped who I am today. As my education has progressed in the field, I became aware of the marriage between psychology and biology reflecting of one another. I strive to continually approach the world through a pragmatic paradigm. Learning about behavior has taught me how to align my actions with my ambitions.
  4. What do you do for fun? Without obligation, I enjoy creating compositions of sounds to share as stories. Writing songs is my favorite creative practice because it strengthens my writing skills by elucidating lessons that I have learned or have yet to learn. I find it fun to fill space with sounds that create an atmosphere through live music. I also enjoy recording myself and other artists to help them in their musical endeavors.
  5. What academic experience or accomplishment are you most proud of? I am just happy that I have learned to care about thoroughly educating myself. Becoming a member of the Psi Chi Honor Society was a great reflection of my efforts, which was fun to celebrate with my family.
  6. What is your favorite movie, book, and TV show related to psychology? My favorite book related to psychology is The Power of Now by Eckhart Tolle. This book implores the reader to take reign of their own attention by consciously placing it in their present environment. As a gradual practice of being in the moment, I realized how often I was thinking about the past or wondering about the future. Letting go of ruminating thoughts is such a peaceful experience and a great way to choose your own mindset.
  7. What single thing do you hope to accomplish at UWGB before graduating? Next semester I will be starting an independent study. I think it would be incredibly cool to have a piece of work published as an undergraduate.
  8. What else do you want people to know about you? I travel as often as I can. This past summer I went on a road trip heading to the pacific northwest while camping along the way with my cat, Liška. This is one of my favorite experiences so far in my life.
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Psychology, Service, Inquiry: The PSI Talks Are Returning!

PSITalks- Blog picDo you have powerful ideas that are worth spreading? If so, here’s an opportunity to share those ideas as a PSI Talk!  The UWGB Psychology Program would like to invite you to apply to do a short, 8 to 10 minute, presentation on an aspect of psychology as part of PSI Talks, an event we are hosting on March 27, 2019 at 7:00pm.  This event will include several engaging and thought provoking student presentations, followed by a reception.  See video of last year’s talks here.

Possible topic areas for talks might include:

  • a meaningful personal experience you have had that can be connected to psychological concepts
  • service you have done for the community or on campus that is connected to your psychology education (e.g., an internship or volunteer experience)
  • a way that you use psychology in your work or your career
  • a review of a psychological concept or literature and how it is relevant to everyday life
  • original research you have conducted as a Research Assistant, Honors Student, or in class

The PSI Talks Will Be Held On Wednesday, March 27th, 2019 at 7:00pm in Fort Howard Hall of the Weidner Center. 

To be considered, you must:

  • be a UW-Green Bay Psychology major or a graduate of the UW-Green Bay Psychology program,
  • submit a 200-word abstract describing your talk, and
  • provide the name of a UW-Green Bay Psychology faculty member who would be willing to endorse your talk and supervise your talk if you are selected.
  • not have given a talk at the 2017 PSI Talks.

Please email the information below to Dr. Ryan Martin (martinr@uwgb.edu) by 5:00 pm on Friday, November 2nd.  We will then select semi-finalists who will meet with the selection committee for a brief interview the week of the November 12th.  The final presenters will be identified and notified that week.

PSI Talk Proposal

Name:
Email Address:
Title of Your Talk (does not need to be final):
Type of Talk (check one):

  • __ a meaningful personal experience you have had that can be connected to psychological concepts
  • __ service you have done for the community or on campus that is connected to your psychology education (e.g., an internship or volunteer experience)
  • __ a way that you use psychology in your work or your career.
  • __ a review of a psychological concept or literature and how it is relevant to everyday life
  • __ original research you have conducted as a Research Assistant, Honors Student, or in class

Abstract: Please describe the talk you would like to do in 200 words or less, making it clear how it connects to Psychology.

Faculty Sponsor (Please make sure to ask him or her before submitting the form):

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Featured Student: Natalie Ehren

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When are you graduating?
I will be graduating in either the fall or spring of 2021.
What are your career plans?
I plan on completing a doctoral program in a field of neuroscience before I go on to be a professor and researcher.
Why did you major in psychology?
I majored in psychology because I saw a gap in research and understanding mental health.  In response to this, I wanted to at least try to get some of those answers for the people who do not know how to ask, and I think psychology is the best way to do that.
What do you do for fun?
A good portion of what I do for fun is what most people hate.  As a former women’s lacrosse player, I love to run and stay in shape.  I spend a good portion of my time reading both classic and contemporary literature as well as writing poetry and my own book.  In addition to all of this, I relax by cooking and baking; making vegetarian food that my sister will not eat since there is no meat in it is probably the best part.  Above all of this, I have the most fun being a mom to my puppy.
What academic experience or accomplishment are you most proud of?
The academic experience I am most proud of was being invited to be one of Dr. Jason Cowell’s research assistants even though I am going to have to work with young children (they make me uncomfortable).
What is your favorite movie, book, and TV show related to psychology?
I do not watch many movies, so I do not have a favorite one.  My favorite psychology TV show is Criminal Minds.  I would have to select The Catcher In The Rye as my favorite book.
What single thing do you hope to accomplish at UWGB before graduating?
I want to complete an honors project that will be the jumping off point to my future research.
What else do you want people to know about you?
My puppy is a black goldendoodle named PoPoe (after Poseidon and Edgar Allan Poe) and he will be turning five months old very soon.  I am a big supported of mental health literacy and hope to do some fun and interactive activities on campus that make the subject much more approachable.  Everyone is welcome to visit me in the neuroscience lab!  I promise to do my best not to stab you while gelling your EEG!
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Success Tips for Students: Class Etiquette

Are you a front-row or a back-row kind of person? Middle? We all know that those unassigned seats become unofficially assigned pretty quick (unless you want to start a beef with one of your classmates). That first or second day, pick a seat where you feel comfortable, can see the screen and whiteboard, and can hear the instructor well. A front row seat might keep you at attention. If you are an introvert, try sitting in front of the professor’s computer. Although it may be uncomfortable at first, it is highly likely that the professor will learn your name and greet you every class. And that, my friends, is a good thing.

SILENCE, FOOLS

Selective silence, perhaps. Professors (and your classmates) like it when you answer their questions. And ask questions relevant to the class. But don’t be talking to your friends during class. It distracts everyone. And put your phone on silent. Unless there is an emergency, or you are playing Kahoot in class, there’s really no reason to have it out.

Do you really need a laptop?

Laptops can be great to take notes or look up something but can quickly become a distraction. You know when you’re on YouTube late at night and soon you find yourself in the weird part of the internet? Laptops in class are dangerous like that. You can start out with good intentions, but soon find yourself Facebook messaging or finding out what kind of bread you are on BuzzFeed. And yes, the people behind you are also watching Parks and Rec if you are. A better option to laptops is handwritten notes. You are then hearing the lecture, writing your interpretation of it, seeing what you are writing, and less prone to distraction.

Communication is Key

Communicate with your professor if you will need to miss class. Be proactive and let them know that you will be missing BEFORE you miss. DO NOT SAY “will I miss anything important?” Of course you are missing something important! You’re not paying thousands of dollars to sit and do nothing. Understand that sometimes you will not be able to make up a quiz, exam, or in-class activity. However, instructors are people too. If you let them know ahead of time that you will miss, and you have a valid reason for absence, they may be willing to work with you on a make-up assignment.

Don’t forget! If you have in-depth questions or feel lost in a class, use your professor! They are experts in their field! Sometimes a one-on-one session in office hours will help you understand the material better.

And finally….Avoid packing up early

Zippers, notebooks closing, jackets being put on, we all know the tell-tale signs of class ending. More times than not, the professor knows what time class ends and doesn’t need the little reminders. Those sounds are distracting to the professor and your classmates. Wait for the professor to be done with class to start packing up your stuff.

Author: Roz is a senior majoring in Psychology and Business Administration with emphases in Marketing and Human Resources. After graduating in May 2020, she plans to go to grad school for Industrial-Organizational Psychology.

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