The Psych Report

The Blog for the Psychology Program at the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay

Category: Games and Fun (page 1 of 3)

What’s in the Box Video Challenge

Finding Little Albert: A Journey to John B. Watson’s Infant Laboratory 

Watson’s original experiment looked to classically condition baby Albert to be afraid of fluffy objects or animals. Watson and graduate student Rayner used loud noise to eventually classically condition Little Albert to fear fussy objects such as rats and bunnies. When they would show Albert the fluffy object or animal, they would present a loud noise so Albert would eventually associate the loud noise (the fear) with the object being presented. Over time of classically conditioning Little Albert he did become fearful of fluffy objects.

Beck, H. P., Levinson, S., & Irons, G. (2009). Finding little albert: A journey to john B. watson’s infant laboratory. American Psychologist, 64(7), 605-614. doi:10.1037/a0017234


 

More Than a Just a Game: Video Game and Internet Use During Emerging Adulthood 

This study looked to examine video games and internet use and their relationship to emerging adulthood. The study examined the excessive video game and internet use to risk behaviors, perceptions of self, and relationships with others. The research suggests that video game and internet use lead to negative outcomes for men and women. Result showed that there were different relations to risk behaviors, perceptions of self, and relationships with others based on the type of internet exposure and gender. The researchers explain that despite the data of this research being exploratory it is the first research that provided some explanation that video game and internet use are related to significant aspects of the individual’s development while emerging adulthood.

Padilla-Walker, L., Nelson, L. J., Carroll, J. S., & Jensen, A. C. (2010). More than a just a game: Video game and internet use during emerging adulthood. Journal of Youth and Adolescence, 39(2), 103-13. doi:10.1007/s10964-008-9390-8


 

Pass the ketchup, please”: familiar flavors increase children’s willingness to taste novel foods 

It was hypothesized that when introducing a new food, the child is more likely to like the food if it is dipped in ketchup. Ketchup is a familiar taste and condiment to most Americans therefore having a familiar taste combined with the new food has shown to make the new food more appetizing. This hypothesis was then related to familiar and unfamiliar chips. The results showed that children were more likely to try unfamiliar chips with a familiar dip. This showed that having a familiar condiment can increase children’s willingness to try new foods.

Pliner, P., & Stallberg-White, C. (2000). “Pass the ketchup, please”: Familiar flavors increase children’s willingness to taste novel foods. Appetite, 34(1), 95-103 doi:10.1037/a0017234

Psychathlon: The Online Psychology Trivia Game

Online Psychology Trivia in Just Three Simple Steps: Remind ♦ Kahoot ♦ Play

Step 1: Sign Up for Text Alerts Via Remind

CaptureStep 2: Download the Kahoot App

Capture

Step 3: Play… and Win!
When you get a notification about a new game, play along.  We’ll have a new game every other week or so and you’ll get three days to play. wwwwwww

 

Poll: Who is Your Favorite Psychologist?

Who is your favorite psychologist?

View Results

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Extracurricular Psychology Badges

You can now earn badges for your involvement in psych department extracurricular activities.  Here’s how:

Step 1: Enroll in the UWGB Psychology D2L Page

  1. Login to D2L.
  2. On the D2L Homepage, click self registration.
  3. Click “UWGB Psychology” from the list of courses.
  4. Follow the instructions from there.

self-registerStep 2: Check out the available badges

You can see the list of available badges by going into the UWGB Psychology class  you just joined, clicking on “Awards” and clicking on “Available Badges.”  There are too many to list here but there are badges for…

  • Attending P/HD or Psi Chi events and speakers,
  • Joining Psi Chi,
  • Participating in professional development activities,
  • and more.

OrgSmorg-er

Step 3: Earn badges 

From there, it’s simple.  Do what you need to do to earn badges, tell a Psi Chi or P/HD Club officer, and they will credit you.  If you have questions, contact Ryan Martin (martinr@uwgb.edu), Allee Schramm (schraj04@uwgb.edu), or Annemarie Schwery (schwae25@uwgb.edu).

App All Star

See if you can earn them all!

 

UWGB Psych March Madness, Championship

Here are the final match-ups. Please vote in each of the polls below.

See here for more information about the studies.

You have until 8:00 pm tonight to vote. Results will be available soon after.


For our champion, Which study was more influential?

  • 2. Pavlov, I. P. (1927) (54%, 21 Votes)
  • 1. Piaget, J. (1954) (46%, 18 Votes)

Total Voters: 39

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For 3rd place, which study was more influential?

  • 5. Milgram, S. (1963) (77%, 30 Votes)
  • 3. Zimbardo, P, G. (1972) (23%, 9 Votes)

Total Voters: 39

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UWGB Psychology March Madness, Round 4

Here are the eight second round match-ups. Please vote in each of the polls below.

See here for more information about the studies.

You have until 8:00 pm tonight to vote. Results will be available soon after.


Which study was more influential?

  • 1. Piaget, J (1954) (51%, 20 Votes)
  • 5. Milgram, S. (1963) (49%, 19 Votes)

Total Voters: 39

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Which study was more influential?

  • 2. Pavlov, I. P. (1927) (63%, 25 Votes)
  • 3. Zimbardo, P, G. (1972) (38%, 15 Votes)

Total Voters: 40

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UWGB Psychology March Madness: Round 2

Here are the eight second round match-ups.  Please vote in each of the polls below.

See here for more information about the studies.

You have until 8:00 pm tonight to vote. Results will be available soon after.


Which study was more influential?

  • 1. Piaget, J. (1954) (83%, 33 Votes)
  • 17. Ekman, P., & Friesen, W. V. (1971) (18%, 7 Votes)

Total Voters: 40

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Which study was more influential?

  • 9. Asch, S. E. (1955) (75%, 30 Votes)
  • 8. Festinger, L., & Carlsmith, J. M. (1959) (25%, 10 Votes)

Total Voters: 40

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Which study was more influential?

  • 4. Bandura, A., Ross, D., & Ross, S. A. (1961) (78%, 31 Votes)
  • 20. Masters, W. H., & Johnson, V. E. (1966) (23%, 9 Votes)

Total Voters: 40

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Which study was more influential?

  • 5. Milgram, S. (1963) (80%, 33 Votes)
  • 12. Watson, J. B., & Rayner, R. (1920) (20%, 8 Votes)

Total Voters: 41

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Which study was more influential?

  • 2. Pavlov, I. P. (1927) (90%, 37 Votes)
  • 15. Sherif, M., Harvey, O. J., White, B. J., Hood, W. R., & Sherif, C (10%, 4 Votes)

Total Voters: 41

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Which study was more influential?

  • 7. Skinner, B. F. (1948) (63%, 25 Votes)
  • 10. Loftus, E. F. (1975) (38%, 15 Votes)

Total Voters: 40

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Which study was more influential?

  • 3. Zimbardo, P, G. (1972) (90%, 36 Votes)
  • 19. Rotter, J. B. (1966) (10%, 4 Votes)

Total Voters: 40

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Which study was more influential?

  • 11. Harlow, H. F. (1958) (80%, 32 Votes)
  • 6. Seligman, M. E. P., & Maier, S. F. (1967) (20%, 8 Votes)

Total Voters: 40

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