Feeding the Body and Mind: Physical and Mental Health Study Abroad in France

The goal of the trip is to learn from experiencing how the bounty of nature can help feed our bodies and minds. In Paris we will discover how gardens and parks help reduce the stresses inherent in urban life in big cities such as this.  In Nice, we will walk by the Mediterranean Sea and feel the benefits of moving water and taste the food that comes from the sea to the table.

Details:

  • What Courses: Nutritional Science (NUT SCI 499)/Psychology (PSYCH 499)
  • Program Dates: May 17, 2020 – June 1, 2020
  • Professors: Deb Pearson & Georjeanna Wilson-Doenges

Want to know more?

  • Check out the website
  • email Georjeanna: wilsong@uwgb.edu
  • Come to an Informational Session:
    • Thursday November 21 5:00-5:30pm in MAC 109
  • Come to a Drop-In Informational Session:
    • Wednesday December 4 11:00am-12:00pm in the World Unity Room A (in the Union)

 

What’s in the Box Video Challenge

Finding Little Albert: A Journey to John B. Watson’s Infant Laboratory 

Watson’s original experiment looked to classically condition baby Albert to be afraid of fluffy objects or animals. Watson and graduate student Rayner used loud noise to eventually classically condition Little Albert to fear fussy objects such as rats and bunnies. When they would show Albert the fluffy object or animal, they would present a loud noise so Albert would eventually associate the loud noise (the fear) with the object being presented. Over time of classically conditioning Little Albert he did become fearful of fluffy objects.

Beck, H. P., Levinson, S., & Irons, G. (2009). Finding little albert: A journey to john B. watson’s infant laboratory. American Psychologist, 64(7), 605-614. doi:10.1037/a0017234


 

More Than a Just a Game: Video Game and Internet Use During Emerging Adulthood 

This study looked to examine video games and internet use and their relationship to emerging adulthood. The study examined the excessive video game and internet use to risk behaviors, perceptions of self, and relationships with others. The research suggests that video game and internet use lead to negative outcomes for men and women. Result showed that there were different relations to risk behaviors, perceptions of self, and relationships with others based on the type of internet exposure and gender. The researchers explain that despite the data of this research being exploratory it is the first research that provided some explanation that video game and internet use are related to significant aspects of the individual’s development while emerging adulthood.

Padilla-Walker, L., Nelson, L. J., Carroll, J. S., & Jensen, A. C. (2010). More than a just a game: Video game and internet use during emerging adulthood. Journal of Youth and Adolescence, 39(2), 103-13. doi:10.1007/s10964-008-9390-8


 

Pass the ketchup, please”: familiar flavors increase children’s willingness to taste novel foods 

It was hypothesized that when introducing a new food, the child is more likely to like the food if it is dipped in ketchup. Ketchup is a familiar taste and condiment to most Americans therefore having a familiar taste combined with the new food has shown to make the new food more appetizing. This hypothesis was then related to familiar and unfamiliar chips. The results showed that children were more likely to try unfamiliar chips with a familiar dip. This showed that having a familiar condiment can increase children’s willingness to try new foods.

Pliner, P., & Stallberg-White, C. (2000). “Pass the ketchup, please”: Familiar flavors increase children’s willingness to taste novel foods. Appetite, 34(1), 95-103 doi:10.1037/a0017234

Independent Learning Experience Event

This year was the very first Independent Learning Experience Event sponsored by the PsycHD Club. You can learn more and access the information that was covered at the meeting and all those amazing opportunities here: Independent Learning Experience Information

Psychology, Service, Inquiry: The PSI Talks Are Returning!

PSITalks- Blog picDo you have powerful ideas that are worth spreading? If so, here’s an opportunity to share those ideas as a PSI Talk!  The UWGB Psychology Program would like to invite you to apply to do a short, 8 to 10 minute, presentation on an aspect of psychology as part of PSI Talks, an event we are hosting on March 27, 2019 at 7:00pm.  This event will include several engaging and thought provoking student presentations, followed by a reception.  See video of last year’s talks here.

Possible topic areas for talks might include:

  • a meaningful personal experience you have had that can be connected to psychological concepts
  • service you have done for the community or on campus that is connected to your psychology education (e.g., an internship or volunteer experience)
  • a way that you use psychology in your work or your career
  • a review of a psychological concept or literature and how it is relevant to everyday life
  • original research you have conducted as a Research Assistant, Honors Student, or in class

The PSI Talks Will Be Held On Wednesday, March 27th, 2019 at 7:00pm in Fort Howard Hall of the Weidner Center. 

To be considered, you must:

  • be a UW-Green Bay Psychology major or a graduate of the UW-Green Bay Psychology program,
  • submit a 200-word abstract describing your talk, and
  • provide the name of a UW-Green Bay Psychology faculty member who would be willing to endorse your talk and supervise your talk if you are selected.
  • not have given a talk at the 2017 PSI Talks.

Please email the information below to Dr. Ryan Martin (martinr@uwgb.edu) by 5:00 pm on Friday, November 2nd.  We will then select semi-finalists who will meet with the selection committee for a brief interview the week of the November 12th.  The final presenters will be identified and notified that week.

PSI Talk Proposal

Name:
Email Address:
Title of Your Talk (does not need to be final):
Type of Talk (check one):

  • __ a meaningful personal experience you have had that can be connected to psychological concepts
  • __ service you have done for the community or on campus that is connected to your psychology education (e.g., an internship or volunteer experience)
  • __ a way that you use psychology in your work or your career.
  • __ a review of a psychological concept or literature and how it is relevant to everyday life
  • __ original research you have conducted as a Research Assistant, Honors Student, or in class

Abstract: Please describe the talk you would like to do in 200 words or less, making it clear how it connects to Psychology.

Faculty Sponsor (Please make sure to ask him or her before submitting the form):

New Poll: Which of these reactions have you heard when you tell people you study psychology?

 

Which of these reactions have you heard when you tell people you study psychology (check all that apply)?

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Welcome Back: Six Things to Get Excited About This Semester

Well, it’s finally here. Fall semester starts…. now.  And we have a bunch of great stuff planned for you.  Here are just a handful of the things you have to look forward to over the next few months.

  1. Bi-Weekly Podcasts (available on ITunes, Google Play, and here): A new episode of our podcast, Psychology and Stuff, will drop every other Thursday afternoon.  Our first guests, Dr. Jana Fogaca, will discuss her work as a sport psychologist (learn more here). Dr. Fogaca  is a new faculty member in the psychology program so this will be a great chance to get to know her.
  2. Featured Students/Alumni: Each Monday, we’ll feature one of our students or alum on the blog so you can get to know a little bit about what they’ve done, what their plans are, and what they hope to accomplish before they graduate.  First up, 2015 graduate and former Psi Chi President, Olyvia Kucta.
  3. #GetPsychedGB: As always, the third week of the semester will be dedicated to our #GetPsychedGB campaign.  All week long, we’ll have videos, pictures, games, and more to give you all the reasons you should get involved in psychology at UW-Green Bay.
  4. The PSI Talks: Once again, we’ll be holding the PSI Talks, six engaging talks from University of Wisconsin-Green Bay psychology students and alumni.  Stay tuned for information about how you can apply.
  5. Even More From the Student Orgs: Keep an eye out for even more great programming from the Psychology and Human Development Club and Psi Chi.  Fun events, volunteer opportunities, presentations, and more on the way.  Stay up to date with them by downloading the app via iTunes or Google Play.
  6. Many Ways to Stay Connected: Stay connected with UWGBpsych via Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Snapchat, and/or the UWGB Psychology Smartphone App. You’ll never miss a thing.