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Category Archive: Uncategorized

The Process Behind Innovation

Six new stories debut in ‘Science of Innovation’ series: http://www.nsf.gov/news/news_summ.jsp?cntn_id=137685&WT.mc_id=USNSF_51&WT.mc_ev=click#.VsXnz-qC-EY.facebook

National Science Foundation, NBC Learn and U.S. Patent and Trademark Office explore process behind innovation.

A new set of educational videos, released February 17th, 2016, continues an exploration begun three years ago into the creative process that leads to innovation. From 3-D bioprinting that could generate heart tissue to origami-inspired structures built for space exploration, the six new “Science of Innovation” stories highlight how innovation can turn fundamental science and engineering ideas into significant societal and economic impacts.

NBC Learn, the educational arm of the NBCUniversal News Group, produced the first set of “Science of Innovation” videos in 2013, in partnership with the National Science Foundation (NSF) and the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO).

Each video aligns to state and national education standards. Lesson plans and activities will be available soon to help teachers engage students in the classroom and teach key concepts about innovation and STEM.

“We’re pleased to partner with the National Science Foundation and the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office to launch the next phase in NBC Learn’s ‘Science of Innovation’ series,” said Soraya Gage, vice president and general manager of NBC Learn. “These videos can inspire students to become inventors of the future whose ideas shape our society.”

The new “Science of Innovation” videos feature the inventions of six trailblazing scientists and engineers from around the country, including:

  • “3-D Bioprinting” — Adam Feinberg of Carnegie Mellon University has created a technique that expands the use of 3-D printing technology and could one day allow researchers to print heart tissue.
  • “Origami Structures” — Origami is the ancient Japanese art of paper folding. To engineer Mary Frecker of Pennsylvania State University, it is the future for designing tools that could be used in fields such as medicine and space exploration.
  • “Friction-Stir Welding” — Welding has long been used to join pieces of metal together. At the University of North Texas, Rajiv Mishra is using a form of welding in a new technology that can improve metal’s strength, toughness, and other properties. It could bring new opportunities to the automotive and aircraft industries.”Motion Controller for Virtual Reality” — William Provancher of Tactical Haptics has developed a device that combines the sense of touch with technology. Called the “reactive grip,” it allows the user to experience the virtual world in a whole new way.
  • “Micro-Fabrication for Cochlear Implants” — Angelique Johnson is the CEO of MEMStim, a company innovating how electrode arrays in cochlear implants are manufactured. Using automated micro-fabrication, instead of costly hand-made manufacturing, Johnson is able to lower the cost of production, allowing more people in need of implants to afford them.
  • “Using Viruses to Make Batteries” — While most people see viruses as harmful, MIT’s Angela Belcher sees the future of energy. Belcher uses viruses engineered in her laboratory to form nano-scale wires for tiny batteries that could eventually be used to produce a wide range of electronics at a lower cost.

-NSF (press release)

Grants.gov Adobe Reader DC Compatibility Issues

Grants.gov Adobe Reader DC Compatibility Issue

The Adobe Reader DC Version 2015.010.20056 released on January 12, 2016 was identified to blank out form field contents when attaching files. Below is the current workaround as we work on a permanent solution for the latest Adobe Reader DC version.

Current Resolution:
1. Uninstall Adobe Reader DC.
2. Go to https://get.adobe.com/reader/otherversions/
3. Select Reader 11.0.10.
4. Download installation file and install.
5. Applicant should be able to successfully complete their application without issue.

For more information, please visit the Grants.gov Adobe Software Compatibility page.

NAS Seminar: “Reproductive Ecology and Habitat Use of Primitive and Sport Fishes of Green Bay”

Please join us Friday, May 1st for the next NAS Seminar Series with Assistant Professor of Biology, Patrick Forsythe, of Natural and Applied Sciences here at UW Green Bay, as he presents “Reproductive Ecology and Habitat Use of Primitive and Sport Fishes of Green Bay”.

Seminar at 3:00 pm in ES 301

Social gathering at 4:00 pm in ES 317

forsythe-1-May

NAS Seminar: “The Evolution of Traditional Ecological Knowledge in India: An Overview”

Please join us Friday, April 17th for the next NAS Seminar Series with Dr. Baisakhi Bandyopadhyay, Senior Fellow in the Ministry of Culture of Government of India, as she presents “The Evolution of Traditional Ecological Knowledge in India: An Overview”.

Seminar at 3:00 pm in ES 301

Social gathering at 4:00 pm in ES 317

Bandyopadhyay-17-April

NAS Seminar: “Sh!t flows downhill: Investigating transborder untreated household wastewater in the Tijuana-San Diego mega region”

Please join us Friday, November 21st for the next NAS Seminar Series with Rachel Russell, Assistant Professor of Public and Environmental Affairs here at UW Green Bay, as she presents “Sh!t flows downhill: Investigating transborder untreated household wastewater in the Tijuana-San Diego mega region”.

Seminar at 3:00 pm in ES 301

Social gathering at 4:00 pm in ES 317

russel-21nov2014

NAS Seminar: “Seeing the Past in the Present: The Environmental History of Driftless Trout Streams”

Please join us Friday, November 7th for the next NAS Seminar Series with Nelson Hamm, Professor of Geology & Environmental Science at St. Norbert College, as he presents “Seeing the Past in the Present: The Environmental History of Driftless Trout Streams”.

Seminar at 3:00 pm in ES 301

Social gathering at 4:00 pm in ES 317

hamm-7-nov2014

NAS Seminar: “The Role of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service in Restoring Native Great Lakes Fish”

Please join us Friday, October 10th for the next NAS Seminar Series with Mark E. Holey, Project Leader, Green Bay Fish and Wildlife Conservation Office, as he presents “The Role of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service in Restoring Native Great Lakes Fish”.

Seminar at 3:00 pm in ES 301

Social gathering at 4:00 pm in ES 317

Holey-10oct2014

NAS Seminar: “Electronic Origins of Acid-Base Character”

Please join us Friday, September 26th for the next NAS Seminar Series with Franklin Chen, Associate Professor of Chemistry, here at UW Green Bay, as he presents “Electronic Origins of Acid-Base Character: Natural Acidity Analysis of Aqueous Bronsted-Lowry Oxyacids”.

Seminar at 3:00 pm in ES 301

Social gathering at 4:00 pm in ES 317Chen-26sep2014

NAS Seminar: “No Place Like Home Anymore!”

Please join us Friday, September 12th for the next NAS Seminar Series with Dr. Stephen Mullin, Professor of Biological Sciences at Eastern Illinois University, as he presents “No Place Like Home Anymore!: Colubrid snakes coping in modified habitats in the Midwest”.

Seminar at 3:00 pm in ES 301

Social gathering at 4:00 pm in ES 317

Mullin-12sep2014

NAS Seminar: “Volcanic Versus Anthropogenic Carbon Dioxide Emissions”

 

Please join us Friday, November 22nd for the next NAS Seminar Series with Terrence M. Gerlach, retired U.S. Geological Surveyor, as he presents “Volcanic Versus Anthropogenic Carbon Dioxide Emissions.”

 Social gathering at 3:00 pm in ES 317

Lecture at 3:30 pm in ES 301