Is waiting with or without food linked to aggression?

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Will people who have to wait a period of time before an activity without food/beverage be more aggressive than people who are waiting that are provided food/beverages?

Research Plan

We will have three groups total

1.) A control group who doesn’t have to wait and isn’t provided food

2.) A group who does have to wait and is provided food

3.) A group who has to wait and is provided food

We will have a researcher in the room telling groups 1&2 that we have to wait for the other presenter who is on her way (we wont tell them how long of wait time). We will have groups of 10 enter and in one group there will be food and beverage provided. After the 15 minute wait period we will give them a survey about their current anger levels and mood.  After the survey we will debrief them about the study and how it was actually to study the correlation between aggression and food.

Related word pairs vs. unrelated word pairs

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Research Question:

Does pairing related words increase recall in college students?

 

After discussing the original proposal, our group has decided to conduct the experiment mostly in the same way it was originally proposed, with a few minor tweaks. The way we will be choosing our word pairs is by studying similar experiments and using their rationale for their own word selection. We will present the words via an online survey, with a pilot test to determine how many word pairs should be shown and for how long. We have decided to use the exact same words for each group, simply in different combinations, with one group getting related word pairs, and one group getting unrelated word pairs. After all pairs have been displayed, participants will be asked to type all words that they can recall in a matter minutes, to which we will determine after running our pilot test. We will then compare the number of words recalled by each group to determine which condition showed an increase in recall.

Do tattoos harm perceptions?

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For our study we would have two different groups of ERLP students. One group would be shown two different pictures: one of a male with a tattoo placed somewhere on their body, and another one of a female with a tattoo placed somewhere on their body. The other group would be shown the exact same pictures, except with the tattoo either taken off completely or with it hidden. Each of the pictures would also have a small description of the person, for example their career, interests, hobbies, etc. The fact that they have a tattoo would be subtly thrown in the description, as if it wasn’t a big deal. We would then ask each group a series of questions in survey format. The questions would be scaled with ratings from 1 to 10 and ask things like “how likely is this person to hold a grudge” and “how likely is it that this person gets along with co-workers?”. At the end of the survey we would ask the participants if they themselves have a tattoo or know anyone that has a tattoo, because that could influence their perceptions of people with tattoos.

Alcohol vs. Cigarettes.

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Research (original) question: Do college students view drinking alcohol as more socially acceptable compared to smoking cigarettes or other tobacco related products?

Process: We will take pictures of of-age students both male and female. One group will hold a beer, for a total of two pictures. Another group will hold a cigarette for a total of two pictures. And in our control group we will have the male and female holding nothing. We’ve decided to use the same female and male in each photo to not deter the viewer of physical appearance differences. The background of each picture would be the same and would be minimal in the picture because the pictures will consist of head-shots with the variable in hand. We would create a survey each participant could take online (ERLP) and it would be open to ages 18 + due to the fact that it would be anonymous and we wouldn’t need parental permission. This may also give us insight as to whether or not underage or of-age participants have a different perception as to what is socially acceptable. We would have the observer view each picture and rate each picture on things such as: how likely they would be to hang out with the individual in the photo, how likely they would be to talk to the individual, how comfortable would they be around that person, how likely it is that the person in the photo would have many or very little friendships, how appropriate they look, how fun does this person look, how cool does this person look, how trustworthy does this person look, how responsible does this person look, how intelligent does this person look, how likely would they or others accept them, etc. on a scale of 1-10. We would also throw in random questions to throw off the participants of what we are trying to study or accomplish. Some questions may be: How often you hang out with friends, how often you go to the movies, how often do you listen to music, how likely would you be to get a tattoo/piercing, how likely would you be to spend $50 dollars at the mall, how likely would they be to drop-out, etc. We will use the responses given by the participants to compare the control group, smoking group, and drinking group, based on the positive and negative ratings. We would also record the demographics and behaviors (does the participant drink/smoke themselves and frequency if they do drink or smoke themselves) of each participant to further analyze survey responses.

Bystander Effect

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Research Question:

Are people more willing to help out someone in need when they are alone or in a group?

Research Plan:

We will do it by having a group member, who will always be a female, “trip” and drop paper when people walk by alone (group 1) and when people walk by in a group (5 or more people)(group 2). This group member will show evidence of needing help by having a convincing “trip”. We will keep it in the same location which we have decided to make it the area near the phoenix club. This allows for more random assignment, a good range of participants, and to take away other variables. The observer will be in the phoenix club, away from the scene taking the information down.

 

Media and Self-Perception

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This experiment will consist of two groups.  One group will be viewing positive social media and the second group will be viewing negative social media.  The independent variables used would be the positive and negative social media posts.  These can be in the form of Facebook posts, tweets, pins on Pinterest, and Instagram photos.  An example of a positive post is, “I just got a 100% on my biology exam!”  A negative example could be, “I just failed my Anatomy exam.” A survey will be created and given to participants after viewing the social media.  The survey will include questions on a 1-10 scale of how a person is feeling.

We are going to conduct the experiment by having participants view the media and taking the survey online.  This way the participants will be in a comfortable environment and not influenced by a lab setting.

The purpose of this experiment is to look at how positive and negative social media has an effect on a person’s self-perception.  Does seeing positive posts make a person feel bad about themselves or do negative posts make a person feel bad about themselves?