Considering a Research Assistantship, Teaching Assistantship, or Internship? Check Out the Department Want Ads

If you’re interested in research or teaching assistantships, internships, or even volunteer work, you should check out the Human Development and Psychology Want Ads, a website where faculty can post these opportunities. This is a particularly good time to look because most faculty members are looking for their fall semester assistants right now. Keep in mind that not all professors will post openings on the website, so if you don’t see someone listed, you may want to visit the faculty links on the Human Development and Psychology websites, see if that person indicates whether or not he or she usually works with RAs or TAs, and then e-mail the individual to express your interest.

Visit the Want Ads today!

Don’t forget, though, that these are just internal positions, and that the Phoenix Recruitment Online (PRO) System through Career Services is where your job search should start. We also have very few internal internship positions. Your internship search might also involve PRO and the list of some of our past internships, but it should begin by making sure you meet pre-requisites and by talking with a faculty member and reviewing the internship policy.

Considering a Research Assistantship, Teaching Assistantship, or Internship? Check Out the Department Want Ads

If you’re interested in research or teaching assistantships, internships, or even volunteer work, you should check out the Human Development and Psychology Want Ads, a website where faculty can post these opportunities. This is a particularly good time to look because most faculty members are looking for their spring semester assistants right now. Keep in mind that not all professors will post openings on the website, so if you don’t see someone listed, you may want to visit the faculty links on the Human Development and Psychology websites, see if that person indicates whether or not he or she usually works with RAs or TAs, and then e-mail the individual to express your interest.

 Visit the Want Ads today! 

 Don’t forget, though, that these are just internal positions, and that the Phoenix Recruitment Online (PRO) System through Career Services is where your job search should start. We also have very few internal internship positions. Your internship search might also involve PRO and the list of some of our past internships, but it should begin by making sure you meet pre-requisites and by talking with a faculty member and reviewing the internship policy.

Independent Studies and Honors Projects: A Student Perspective

In our second installment of articles about students’ individualized learning experiences, we asked Stephanie Freis to share her experiences about her honors project and independent study since she has been fortunate enough to do both.

1. Who are you working with for your independent study?

I am currently working with Dr. Vespia.

2. How did you find out about the independent study and go about getting it?

I was presented the opportunity by Dr. Vespia when we were both in Washington D.C. this summer for the 2011 APA Convention. After talking about it more formally at the beginning of the school year, we decided how many credits worth of work I would like to take on and outlined the major projects I will complete for this semester.

3. What kinds of things do you get to do for your independent study?

I’m gaining better experience in survey methodology and literature research. I will also gain experience in analyzing the data we collect. Before the semester is over I hope to take what we learn from our survey and apply it. The end goal is to profile past PSYCH & HUM DEV graduates on the UWGB website to give students a better idea on what they can do with a Bachelor’s degree.

4. Who did you work with for your honors project?

I had worked with Dr. Gurung.

5. How did you find out about the honors project and go about getting it?

To complete an honors project there is a GPA prerequisite. Since my GPA met the requirement, I was able to approach Dr. Gurung about an honors project and discuss my interests/plans for the semester. I had previously done a Research Assistantship with him so we knew each other’s work ethic and style – I was very happy to be able to continue working with him.

6. What kinds of things did you get to do for your honors project?

In general, I crafted a live discussion activity to immerse participants in a prejudiced Facebook situation. By working through the research challenges from conception, I was able to enhance my understanding of what it takes to be successful in the design, implementation, analysis, and report of a research study. The process also included extensive literary research.

7. What do you see as the major similarities vs. differences for independent studies and honors projects?

I think both an independent study and an honors project take a great amount of dedication as well as a proactive attitude. You need to be able to outline goals for yourself and stay on track throughout the semester. In my experience, I haven’t noticed astounding differences between the two opportunities. I think it matters more who you choose as a mentor and what topic/methods you plan to pursue. Otherwise, the GPA requirement is the main difference between the two.

Editors’ Notes: Independent study is also commonly used to engage in self-directed study with a faculty sponsor of a specific content area. In these cases, students don’t collect data or do their own research, they do more “class-like” work, such as reading and writing papers. They are studying a more in-depth topic of their choice, however (e.g., trauma in female military veterans), and one in which the faculty member has expertise. You need consent of instructor to do an independent study, and we can only sponsor so many of them and those within our content areas. Students interested in this option should approach the faculty member who seems most appropriate with a very specific idea of what they wish to study and how (maybe even with a tentative reading list!). Students interested in doing an honors project should also approach a faculty member who has expertise in an area they hope to study for the project. However, UW-Green Bay requires that students have a 3.5 GPA in the major (a 3.75 for all upper-level major courses) to do an honors project.

Research Assistantships: A Student Perspective

When we first started writing The Pink Flamingo, we interviewed some students engaged in internships, research assistantships, and teaching assistantships. We decided to conduct some new interviews with recent students. In our first installment, Matt Machnik tells us about his RA with Dr. Martin.

1. Who were you working with for your research assistantship (RA)?

Dr. Ryan Martin

2. How did you find out about the RA and go about getting it?

I first heard about the research assistant opportunities during classes. I talked to different professors about the opportunities that were available. I periodically checked the Human Development Want Ads until an RA opportunity became available that was of particular interest to me. Then, I simply emailed the professor involved with the project, filled out an application, had an interview, and was offered the RA.

3. What kinds of things did you get to do for your RA?

I was able to be involved in just about every step of the research process. There were weekly meetings held during which Dr. Martin, the other RAs, and I would discuss the different studies we were working on during the semester. We continually worked on the methodology for each of the studies, and each of the RAs was given opportunities to provide suggestions for how to improve, or “fine tune,” them.

In addition, I had the opportunity to run data collections. This was my favorite part. This involved actually carrying out the different studies we had planned. I thought it was especially enjoyable because it was great to see people completing the measures we spent so much time preparing. Afterward, I would code the data in SPSS. This process was especially helpful, as it allowed me additional practice with SPSS.

Beyond that, I completed a literature review on the subject of my choice. While the prospect of having to write a paper isn’t always exciting to students, I believe it was a great learning experience. It gave me the opportunity to spend time familiarizing myself with scientific literature, as well as hone my writing skills.

4. How do you think the RA related to what you have learned in your classes?

Generally speaking, it gave me a better understanding of the research process. Since so much of what is taught at UWGB is research driven, it is apparent that this increased understanding will be of use when considering how scientific knowledge is gained. In addition, it helped improve my ability to critically analyze scientific literature – a skill that will come in handy when completing research related class assignments.

I also feel that my experience in the RA program will be of use when completing my Honors Project/Independent Study. The RA provided an excellent example of the type of work that will be involved in developing my project. In essence, the RA was a “warm up” to the research process that I will be carrying out. I would highly recommend that anyone considering doing an Honors Project or Independent Study participate in the RA program first, as it will help them become more familiar with research as a whole.

5. How important has this RA been to your educational experience at UWGB, and why?

Quite important. The experience has proved to be an asset not only when completing the coursework, but also in other projects, such as my Independent Study, as well as the internship that I am currently involved in. I strongly believe that I am a much more competent student than I was before doing the research assistantship, and this has helped enrich my educational experience here at UWGB. I also believe that the improved experience while doing my undergraduate work will also help me become a stronger graduate student. Thus, I believe the experience will pay off both immediately and in my future endeavors as well.

Editors’ Note: Wondering about getting a research assistantship of your own? Read the faculty profiles on the Human Development and Psychology websites to learn who typically works with RAs. These profiles also provide information about the research topics of interest to these professors. As registration time draws nearer for the next semester, you can also check out the department “Want Ads” to see if any openings are listed. Not all faculty members will list their opportunities there, so you should also feel free to contact professors directly to see if they are looking for RAs and find out how to apply.

Interested in a Research or Teaching Assistantship, Internship? Check Out the Department Want Ads

If you’re interested in research or teaching assistantships, internships, or even volunteer work, you should check out the Human Development and Psychology Want Ads, a website where faculty can post these opportunities. This is a particularly good time to look because most faculty members are looking for their spring semester assistants right now. Keep in mind that not all professors will post openings on the website, so if you don’t see someone listed, you may want to visit the faculty links on the Human Development and Psychology websites, see if that person indicates he/she usually works with RAs or TAs, and then email the individual to express your interest.   

To visit the Want Ads website click here. Don’t forget, though, that these are just internal positions, and the PRO System  through Career Services is where your job search should start. We also have very few internal internship positions. Your internship search might also involve PRO and the list of some of our past internships, but it should begin by making sure you meet pre-requisites and by talking with a faculty member.

Don’t Forget…the Departmental Want Ads are Live

Last month, we told you about the new blog for advertising teaching assistantships, internships, or even volunteer work.  We just wanted to take a minute to remind you that the Human Development and Psychology Wants Ads are live and right now is a great time to take a look because many faculty members are starting their searches for Fall semester teaching and research assistants, not to mention interns and other opportunities. To take a look at the want ads, go to: https://blog.uwgb.edu/hudpsychwantads.

We also wanted to remind you, though, that the ads posted there are only internal, departmental postings. Your first resource in your job or internship search should always be the PRO system through Career Services.

Two Upcoming Presentations from Dr. Jill White

There will be two presentations from Dr. White in the next month.  First,  she will be speaking at a presentation titled Derogatory Terms: Past, Present, and Future, which will take place on March 27th from 2:00-3:30 p.m. in the Christie TheaterSecond, as part of the Human Development and Psychology Faculty Colloquia Series, she will be presenting her research on the topic of Mexican Teens, Identity and Education.  This second presentation will be on April 3rd from 6:00 to 7:00 p.m. in Rose Hall 250.

Join an Upcoming Teleconference on “Living With Grief: Children and Adolescents”

Students interested in learning more about the grieving process in children have a unique opportunity to take part in a teleconference on campus scheduled for April 16th from 1:30-4:00 p.m. The program features a panel of experts, and it will be moderated by Frank Sesno, who is a Professor of Media and Public Affairs at The George Washington University and a Special Correspondent with CNN. You will be able to join the conference in our very own MAC Hall via the Video-Conferencing Room. If you would like to attend and/or want more information, please contact Professor Illene Noppe (noppei@uwgb.edu).

UWGB Students to Present at National Psychology Conference in Boston!

Five Human Development and Psychology students will present their research at 116th Annual Convention of the American Psychological Association in Boston, MA this August. They submitted their work for consideration last semester and just found out in the last couple of weeks that it had been accepted for inclusion in the conference. A big PF congratulations goes out to current students Jaimie Henschel, Stephanie Sabinash, and Janet Weidert and recent graduates Amanda Jeske and Kristen Kratcha. Many of these students will be co-presenters with the faculty members attending the conference: Drs. Gurung, Martin, Vespia, and Wilson-Doenges.

UWGB Student Wins ADEC Scholarship!

UWGB student Erika Linzmeier has won an Association for Death Education and Counseling (ADEC) Student Initiative Committee scholarship to attend that organization’s prestigious research conference in Montreal, Canada this spring. Erika has been doing work on a national study of college student grief with Professors Illene Noppe and Ryan Martin. Congratulations Erika!!

Faculty Colloquia Series to Continue this Spring: First up, Dr. Illene Noppe

Last semester, four Human Development and Psychology faculty presented their research to over 300 students at presentations over the course of the semester.  This semester, Drs. Noppe, White, Vespia, and Bartell will all present on recent research projects.  On February 21st, Dr. Illene Noppe will present on Palm Pilots in the Hands of Teens: A New Way to Study Adolescent Grief, an exciting study she did that explored the experiences of bereaved teenagers.  The presentation will be from 5:00 to 5:30 in MAC 204.

Research Assistantships: A Student Perspective

Last month, we brought you a new feature with our first “Student Perspective” interview.  This month, we bring you our second installment with Brittany Broder, a senior Psychology major and Human Biology minor who is serving in her second semester as a Research Assistant.

1. Who are you working with for your research assistantship (RA)?

Dr. Kate Burns

2. How did you find out about the RA and go about getting it?

I heard a lot of my classmates talking about doing research with different professors, and I thought it sounded pretty neat. Then not too long later Dr. Burns approached me about doing research, and I agreed very quickly.

3. What kinds of things do you get to do for your RA?

I do a lot of background readings on past research.  I also help develop some of the ways we test things in the lab. After the experiment gets approved through the IRB, I run the lab: having participants sign informed consents, getting the computers set up, getting participants in the rooms, having them read debriefing forms. After the experiment is done then I code the data, and sometimes I enter it into Excel. Very exciting stuff.

4. How do you think the RA relates to what you have learned in your classes?

It is exactly like Dr. Lorenz’s experimental psychology class, except I didn’t have to come up with the original idea. It also helps me to understand the theory and mathematical analysis behind classes like Tests and Measurements, such as “oh that is why I care about error!” or “standard conditions are important for every subject because….” It is also helpful when reading research articles that other professors have a student read. I understand why the methodology, and p-values are important to mention in those articles.

5. How important has this RA been to your educational experience at UWGB, and why?

Being an RA has been very important; it allows me to understand the entire process behind running an experiment from start to finish. I know that this is something I will be doing in my future career as a graduate student and as an employee. Most importantly, it allowed me to get to know one of my professors on a different level. Working side by side with Dr. Burns is such an honor; she has a Ph.D., and I am just an undergraduate student. Getting to know a professor is also helpful when the time for letters of recommendation comes around!

Editors’ Note: Wondering about getting a research assistantship of your own?  Read the want ads below for information about who is looking for RAs right now.  Also, the Human Development and Psychology websites have information on what faculty members are researching what, so check them out for more information.