So…What’s an Advisor, and Where Can I Get One?

Believe it or not, if you are reading this newsletter, you probably have your very own Human Development or Psychology faculty advisor. Advisors are assigned based on an alphabetical breakdown by students’ last names. Current students should stay with the same faculty advisor throughout their time here. You can find the name of your advisor in SIS. Students wishing to declare a HUD or PSYCH major or minor can find their assigned advisors at this link on the department website.

Some important information about advisors:

  • Advisors want to talk with you – go see them!
  • Psychology and Human Development advising assignments are currently the same. So…if you are a Human Development major and Psychology minor, you can get all of your advising from one person – talk about one-stop shopping!
  • Once you are assigned an advisor, you stay with that person. We may change our alphabetical assignments each year, but you do not switch advisors when we do. We want you to get good, continuous advising from the same person!
  • Your faculty advisor can answer questions about the major/minor, overall graduation requirements, and General Education. The Academic Advising Office is absolutely wonderful, but after you declare a major, you should work with your Human Development/Psychology faculty advisor.
  • What do you do if you have a concern about your advisor, or if you want to change advisors? Talk to that person directly and/or consult with a Department Chairperson: Regan Gurung (Human Development) and/or Georjeanna Wilson-Doenges (Psychology).

Careers of the Month (February 2007)

Worried about your future career? Tired of people asking you, “What are you going to do with a Human Development or Psychology major?”  Find an answer!  To help you in your quest, The Pink Flamingo will include two regular features: “Careers of the Month” and the “Career/Grad School Tip of the Month.”

Probation and Parole Officer: Interested in forensics? Want a challenging career working with and helping people?  Learn more about probation and parole officers at: http://www.bls.gov/oco/ocos265.htm

Occupational Therapist: Willing to go to graduate school and want to help people, but don’t want to be a counselor? Think about occupational therapy, and learn more at: http://www.bls.gov/oco/ocos078.htm 

Not satisfied with two measly career options? Check out the results of Career Services’ annual survey and see a list of actual UWGB students’ first jobs and graduate school placements: http://www.uwgb.edu/careers/Graduate_Survey_Main.htm#Results

The Legend of The Pink Flamingo

First, why is this newsletter called The Pink Flamingo, you might ask?  Students who have visited faculty offices in the C Wing already know the answer.  For those of you who haven’t seen the pink plastic “lawn ornaments” outside the offices of Drs. Gurung, Martin, L. Noppe, Von Dras, and Wilson-Doenges, come up and take a look.  How do these beautifully dressed/decorated creatures appear?  Some suspect Twila, our Academic Department Associate.  Some think it’s Dr. Gurung, who, as always, in turn blames Dr. Martin.  Some even suspect it’s a poltergeist (maybe, more accurately, a “poultry”-geist), but no one knows for sure.  Actually, it all started when Dr. Illene Noppe asked her son for a pink flamingo for Mother’s Day…. Want to know more?  You’ll have to wait for the next issue of The Pink Flamingo.

HUD/PSYCH Trivia (February 2007)

HUD/PSYCH Trivia: Ivan Petrovich Pavlov is often discussed in Human Development and Psychology classes. However, his degree is not in Human Development or Psychology. In what field and from which institution did Ivan Pavlov earn his degree?

Answer: Nick Westphal was able to correctly identify that Ivan Petrovich Pavlov was a physician who earned a degree in the natural sciences from St. Petersburg University.  In fact, he won the Nobel Prize for his work on digestion in 1904, well before he inadvertently discovered “conditioned reflexes.”  To be clear, this last sentence was referring to Pavlov and not Nick.  Nick hasn’t yet won the Nobel Prize. He did win a candy bar, though. Good work, Nick!

Faculty Trivia (February 2007)

Faculty Trivia: Which faculty member was the star of his or her 4th grade basketball team and scored 23 points in a game against arch-rival Otwell, Indiana?

Answer: Although Dr. L. Noppe was a good guess (he is 6’2” after all), Kristen Kratcha (yeah, Kristen!) was able to figure out that the faculty member who scored 23 points for her 4th grade basketball team was none other than Dr. Vespia! Known then by her elementary school nickname (“Too-Tall Vespia”), she wishes to assure readers that her success had nothing to do with coordination or athletic skill. She was simply a 5 foot, 5 inch 4th grader who could shoot lay-ups over the heads of her peers (who were about a half-foot shorter). She played competitive basketball into her high school years, and she remains an avid fan of the college game (You should expect her to be a bit distracted – yes, even more than usual – throughout March Madness.).

Career/Grad School Tip of the Month: Be Informed!!!

1. Do an informational interview with someone in a field of interest.
2. Job shadow that person for a day.
3. Visit the Career Services’ Job Fair on Feb. 28th! See details at: http://www.uwgb.edu/careers/Programs.htm#CARFAIR
4. Take a look at the graduate school books/resources in MAC C311. As long as the room is not reserved, students are welcome to use the resources located on the bookshelf, but please do not remove them from the C Wing. Careers Services also has a library of books that can be checked out.

Not sure where to start with informational interviews and job shadowing?
Visit The Phoenix Network, made up of graduates and friends of UWGB. These are individuals who have volunteered to talk with students about their careers and other important professional topics.
Learn more at:
http://www.uwgb.edu/careers/Phoenix_Info.htm
And…view possible questions to ask at: http://www.uwgb.edu/careers/Phoenix_Network_Information.htm#Questions