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College of Liberal Arts & Sciences

Zorn receives Sea Grant Award

Professor Michael Zorn of UW-Green Bay’s Natural and Applied Sciences program is the recipient of a two-year, $221,961 grant from the Wisconsin Sea Grant program. His project is titled “Extreme Events, Watershed Loadings and Climate Change: Implications for the Management and Long Term Health of the Green Bay, Lake Michigan, Ecosystem.” With co-investigators Kevin Fermanich of UW-Green Bay and J. Val Klump of UW-Milwaukee, Zorn’s team will seek to understand the dynamics of the pulse delivery of nutrients (particularly phosphorus) to Green Bay. The researchers will deploy sensors at strategic locations in Lake Winnebago, the Lower Fox River and Green Bay to more precisely measure dissolved nutrients and monitor algae growth, particularly harmful algae, in light of climate models that indicate more frequent and more severe rainfall events. Zorn’s project seeks data to better inform land management within the watershed by documenting the severity and frequency of major runoff “pulses” and their impact on algae populations, and perhaps suggest paths to attenuate those impacts.

Sandmires give $1 million for scholarships

Dr. Herbert and Crystal Sandmire have donated $1 million to provide scholarships to students who plan to enter the medical field.   The gift ties a record for the University’s largest-ever single scholarship donation.

“This generous gift will provide a tremendous boost for our Human Biology program and related areas, which are helping to prepare the medical professionals of tomorrow,” Miller said. “Our regional economy depends on training and equipping more doctors and other professionals to provide the best care possible for the people of Northeastern Wisconsin.”

The Sandmires’ gift comes at an important juncture for the future of healthcare in the region, Miller added. UW-Green Bay is a partner institution for a new Medical College of Wisconsin satellite campus that will be housed at St. Norbert College in De Pere.  “Many of our students wish to remain in the area, and the new MCW campus will allow them to do that,” Miller said. “Herb and Crystal’s generosity will help these students pursue their dreams, which truly benefits us all.”

UW-Green Bay records identify the Sandmires as having the longest uninterrupted string of annual giving — 46 years — among the thousands of private individuals who have supported the University and its students throughout the years.  An award-winning doctor of obstetrics and gynecology, Dr. Sandmire was a UW-Green Bay community lecturer in Human Biology from 1968 to 1989. Crystal Sandmire, a University alumna who earned her Communication and the Arts degree in 1980, was a charter member and officer of the UW-Green Bay Founders Association. The Sandmires received UW-Green Bay’s highest community honor, the Chancellor’s Award, in 2006.

UW-Green Bay has made a positive contribution to healthcare in the area, Herb Sandmire said.  “Based on my affiliation with UW-Green Bay, and as an instructor in the college of human biology,” he said, “I have always been impressed with the quality of the institution’s faculty and the many students who have gone through the laboratory instruction and pursued careers in the health sciences or medicine.”

Biologist shares $60,000 USDA grant for crop-fungus research

Lisa Grubisha, assistant professor of biology, has been awarded a $60,000 grant from the United States Department of Agriculture.  Her project is titled “Population Structure of Aspergillus flavus communities in Wisconsin.” The three-year project in collaboration with researcher Peter Cotty of the USDA Agricultural Research Service in Tucson, Ariz., has two components. The first targets fungal communities of corn, while the second will compare microbial communities of organic and non-organic crops and vegetables.

UW-Green Bay senior earns EPA research fellowship

UW-Green Bay senior Robyn Nielsen is the University’s first-ever recipient of a Greater Research Opportunities (GRO) Fellowship from the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).   Nielsen, who is double-majoring in Environmental Policy and Planning and Environmental Science, recently received final notification of the $50,000 fellowship, which provides up to $20,700 per year of academic support for the student’s junior and senior years and $8,600 for an internship at an EPA facility in the summer between the student’s junior and senior years.

The GRO Fellowship is designed to enhance and support quality environmental education for undergraduate students enrolled in an environmentally related field. It is designed to encourage undergraduates in environmentally related fields to continue their education beyond the baccalaureate level and pursue careers in fields that address environmental problems and issues. 

Nielsen’s interests include zero waste, resource recovery and recycling, as well as alternative agriculture practices.

UW seeks tribes’ help to recruit, retain Native American students

Students at the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay who want to learn about the state’s American Indian tribes don’t turn to books, but to tribal elders who live on nearby reservations and keep office hours in Wood Hall.

It’s a unique opportunity for any student on campus to sit face-to-face with a tribal member who is a repository of knowledge and wisdom passed on to him by his elders — everything from tribal beliefs and teachings to tribal culture, language and faith in the Great Spirit, the Creator.

Green Bay is within 100 miles of five Indian reservations for the: Oneida, Menominee, Ho-Chunk, Stockbridge-Munsee and Mole Lake. The Oneida reservation is on the city’s outskirts.

http://www.jsonline.com/news/education/uw-seeks-tribes-help-to-recruit-retain-native-american-students-b99367344z1-278665951.html

 

Cupit and Wolf win Founders Association Awards

Two faculty members in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences are Founders Association Award winners.  Professor Ilene Cupit, Human Development, won the Founders Association Award for Excellence in Community Outreach.  Associate Professor Amy Wolf, Natural and Applied Sciences, won the Founders Association Award for Excellence in Scholarship.

Professor Cupit was honored for being “a dedicated educator whose research interests, passion for learning and caring nature have built bridges to the community.” In particular, the award singled out her tireless efforts in establishing and developing Camp Lloyd, the week-long summer camp at UW-Green Bay for children who have suffered the death of a family member.  Cupit has taught courses in Psychology and Women’s Studies and specializes in cognitive development, infancy and early childhood, and death, dying and grieving.

Professor Wolf studies plant-animal interactions, native bee populations, and forest dynamics in Northern Wisconsin.  Her work has earned grants from the National Science Foundation, the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation, the Smithsonian, and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, among others. The awards citation said Wolf stands out “for obtaining numerous grants, for the quality and quantity of her collaborative research, and for involving both undergraduate and graduate students in nearly all of her projects.”

 

$150K grant awarded to boost internship opportunities

UW-Green Bay’s Center for Public Affairs (CFPA) and Environmental Management and Business Institute (EMBI) received their second $150,000 Career Ready Internship Initiativegrant from Great Lakes Higher Education Guaranty Corporation.  This grant will benefit students by offering them opportunities to gain invaluable, real-world experience through paid internships in their fields of study.  UW-Green Bay will use the grant to create new paid internships and turn previously unpaid internships into paid internships, for juniors and seniors who don’t receive enough financial aid to cover college costs.  Interested businesses and organizations in Northeastern Wisconsin should contact Ashley Heath, (920) 465-2608, or John Arendt, (920) 465-2953, for more information.

Aldrete chosen as “National Lecturer” in archaeology

Historian and classicist Gregory S. Aldrete, professor of Humanistic Studies, has been chosen one of two Joukowsky National Lecturers for the 2014-15 academic year by the Archaeological Institute of America.  The AIA will send Aldrete around the country to deliver at least 14 public lectures in cities including Los Angeles, Orlando, Cincinnati, San Diego, Cleveland, Portland, Indianapolis, Tampa Bay, Ithaca, Iowa City, and Minneapolis.  His topics will include “Hammers, Axes, Bulls, and Blood: Practical Aspects of Roman Animal Sacrifice,” “Floods of the Tiber in Ancient Rome: The Eternal City Goes Under,” and “Reconstructing and Testing Ancient Linen Body Armor: The Linothorax Project.”  Aldrete calls the selection a major honor — the award criteria specifies that lecturers must be “distinguished archaeologists.”

Vescio publishes book on future of literature studies

Associate Professsor Bryan Vescio, Humanistic Studies (English), has published a new book titled “Reconstruction in Literary Studies: An Informalist Approach.” In it, Vescio explores a revitalized future for the Humanities, examining the academic study of literature as an institution with a distinctive and positive social function. He argues that literary study within the university creates an environment that allows scholars and students to develop and discuss their individuality, maintaining the productive diversity that is critical to a democratic culture.

Three Awarded Named Professorships

Professor Cristina Ortiz, Humanistic Studies and Spanish, has been named to the Patricia Wood Baer Professorship in Education, Professor John F. Katers, Natural and Applied Sciences, has been named to the Frederick E. Baer Professorship in Business, and Professor Kevin Fermanich, Natural and Applied Sciences, has been named to the Barbara Hauxhurst Cofrin Professorship of Natural Sciences.  The professorships recognize and give support for tenured faculty members who have demonstrated productive commitments to scholarhsip and/or outreach and whose works exemplify the spirit and mission of UW-Green Bay.  All professorships are effective July 1, 2014 and awardees are appointed for five year terms.