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Humanistic Studies

20 Years Ago Today…

the Berlin Wall fell:

More at Deutsche Welle’s 20 Years Fall of the Wall.

Faculty Forum: Spinoza’s Chunky Clumps

Spinoza’s Chunky Clumps:
Spinoza and the problem of Individuation

Professor Christopher Martin
will discuss what it is about any thing that makes it the thing that it is and not something else!

Friday, November 13
2:00-3:00 pm
University Union, Alumni A
(in back of Cloud Commons)
UW-Green Bay Campus

Great Books Discussion: Ray Bradbury’s _Farenheit 451_

The Department of Humanistic Studies and the Brown County Library invite you to participate in the next Great Books Discussion Tuesday, November 10 on the Lower Level of the Brown County Library (Central Branch – 515 Pine St., Downtown Green Bay) beginning at 6:30 p.m.

Ray Bradbury’s Farenheit 451
presented by Professor David Voelker, UWGB History Department

The discussion is free and open to the public.  Faculty, students, and community members are encouraged to attend.  Of course, we encourage you to read the book before attending the discussion, but even if you cannot, you may find the session enlightening.

See you there!

New Faculty Profile: Gabriel Saxton-Ruiz

Gabriel Saxton-Ruiz is a new faculty member in Humanistic Studies and Spanish.  We thought you might like to know a little more about your professor and colleague, so we asked him a few questions about himself.

Where did you go to college?

Virginia Tech; University of Tennessee

Who was your favorite professor and why?

Luis Cano – he has a wonderful sense of humor, and was not afraid of including Science Fiction/Hard-boiled Detective Novels in “serious” PhD seminars.

You have a PhD in what field?

Modern Foreign Languages (major: Spanish; 2nd concentration: French Studies; 3rd concentration: Applied Linguistics)

What did you do your research on?

Contemporary Peruvian Narrative and Political Violence

What are your current research interests?

I will be presenting a paper (tentatively titled) “Political science fiction in the plays of Juan Rivera Saavedra,” at the Jornadas Internacionales de Teatro en Puebla, Mexico next July.  I am also interested in translating some recent Peruvian novels/short stories.

What courses do you teach?

Spanish Language, Culture and Literature courses

How would you describe your teaching style?

I enjoy classes that are interactive.   I prefer having my students express themselves and relate the texts they read to their own reality.  I try not to lecture for an hour and fifteen minutes.

What do you like to do for fun?

I love to play and watch soccer…I support Club Deportivo Universidad César Vallejo (Peru).  Music – I was a College Radio DJ and worked at a record store…but I don’t wear Kurt Rambis glasses. Cooking – I am the cook in the house – I tend to prepare lots of Peruvian and Spanish dishes.  Family – I love spending time with my wife and kids.

What was the last good book you read?

La paz de los vencidos by Jorge Eduardo Benavides (Tree of Smoke translated by Denis Johnson).

If we looked at your playlist what would we find?

  1. Thirteen – Big Star
  2. God Loves You, Michael Chang – Dent May & His Magnificent Ukulele
  3. Ando Meio Desligado – Os Mutantes
  4. Shoot You Down – Stone Roses
  5. Ain’t Got No/I Got Life – Nina Simone
  6. The Concept – Teenage Fanclub
  7. Here Comes Your Man – Pixies
  8. Town Called Malice – The Jam
  9. If We Can Land a Man on the Moon, Surely I Can Win Your Heart – Beulah
  10. Candy – Morphine
  11. Northern Sky – Nick Drake
  12. The Journey To Serra da Estrela – The Phenomenal Handclap Band
  13. I’m So Tired Of Being Alone – Al Green
  14. Staring At The Sun – TV On The Radio
  15. This Life Makes Me Wonder – Delroy Wilson
  16. Lo que ves es lo que hay – Rubín y los Subtitulados
  17. Anything by the Beatles, Beach Boys, Stevie Wonder and Paco de Lucía…

New Faculty Profile: J. Vincent Lowery

Vince Lowery is a new faculty member in Humanistic Studies and History.  We thought you might like to know a little more about your professor and colleague, so we asked him a few questions about himself.

Where did you go to college? 

University of Mississippi

Who was your favorite professor and why?

Ted Ownby – open to anything, always thinking outside the box – and Winthrop Jordan – the most challenging professor I have ever encountered who transformed my analytical and writing skills.

You have a PhD in what field?

History

What did you do your research on? 

Popular Memories of the Ku Klux Klan, 1870s-1920s

What are your current research interests? 

Popular Culture/Memory; New South Boosterism

What courses do you teach? 

US History, African American History, Ethnic Diversity

How would you describe your teaching style?

Energetic, Passionate

What do you like to do for fun? 

Golf, moviegoing (neither of which are done with great frequency), and getting to know Green Bay with my family

What was the last good book you read?

Amy Wood’s Lynching and Spectacle and John Coski’s The Confederate Battle Flag.

If we looked at your playlist what would we find?

Jim James (of My Morning Jacket), Grizzly Bear, The Swell Season

Sutton Wins Award for Academic Support

Professor Brian Sutton was selected as this year’s recipient for the Founders Award for Institutional Development.  Professor Sutton was recognized for his service across a wide array of University initiatives and campus governance groupss, including service on the UW-Green Bay Faculty Senate, as chairman of the University’s General Education Council and the  Committee on Awards and Recognition, in addition to numerous additional committees and working groups. This fall he begins a one-year term as chairman of the University Committee and the concurrent role as speaker of the Senate. Sutton began his faculty career at UW-Green Bay in 1992.

Jeffreys Wins Teaching Award

Professor Dereke Jeffreys was selected as this year’s recipient of the Founders Award for Excellence in Teaching.   Colleagues and students alike express admiration that each of his courses requires direct engagement with and substantive analysis of significant issues, encouraging students to wrestle with important issues and ideas on a personal level. The citation noted that students consistently describe his courses using phrases such as “the most important I have taken during my undergraduate career,” or “the most though-provoking experience I have encountered.” Jeffreys, the author of a recent, critically acclaimed book on the ethics of torture, and a previous book on Pope John Paul II and his philosophy of human dignity, joined the UW-Green Bay faculty in 2000.

The Last Days of Immanuel Kant

The Green Bay Film Society will present the next International Film of the semester on Wednesday, February th at 7:00 pm in the auditorium of the Neville Public Museum.

The Last Days of Immanuel Kant
(France, 1994)

Based on an 1850s essay by Thomas De Quincey, this little-known drama chronicles a short period in life of the great professor/philosopher in his native Konigsberg, leading up to his 1804 demise at age 80. The story looks more at the great thinker’s odd, obsessive lifestyle than it does his philosophies. Kant, truly a “mad professor,” had himself on a rigid daily schedule. At night he slept in a mummy-wrap while during the day he imbibed tremendous amounts of coffee at rigidly prescribed intervals. The whole town was expected to keep a respectful distance when Kant took his daily walks. Melodrama enters the philosopher’s life after his loyal servant for the past thirty years suddenly leaves.

All are welcome to attend.

More information on the Green bay Film Society may be found here.

Great Books Spring 2009

The Department of Humanistic Studies and the Brown County Library invite you to participate in the fall semester’s Great Books Discussion series.  On the second Tuesday of each month, a member of UW-Green Bay’s Humanitistc Studies faculty will lead a discussion on one of the “great books” of western and world culture.  The schedule for the spring semester 2009 is…

February 10
Shakepeare, The Tempest
(presented by Prof. Catherine Henze, English)

March 10
Leo Tolstoy,  A Prisoner in the Caucasus
(presented by Prof. Kevin Kain, History)

April 14
Hanan Al-Shayk, Women of Sand and Myrrh
(presented by Prof. Heidi Sherman, History)

May 12
John Steinbeck, The Grapes of Wrath
(presented by Sigma Tau Delta English Honor Society)

The discussions are free and open to the public.  Faculty, students, and community members are encouraged to attend.  Of course, we encourage you to read the “great book” before attending the discussion, but even if you cannot finish the work, you may find the session enlightening.

The Great Books Discussion series is held on the Lower Level of the Brown County Library (Central Branch – 515 Pine St., Downtown Green Bay).  Discussions begin at 6:30 p.m.

International Film Series

The Green Bay Film Society, a non-profit community group dedicated to bringing international and independent films to N.E. Wisconsin, in conjunction with the Neville Public Museum of Brown County, the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay, and St. Norbert College, sponsors the Green Bay International Film Series. The following films are being screened during the spring semester, 2009:

February 4
The Last Days of Immanuel Kant (France, 1994)

February 18
Mishima (USA, 1985)

March 4
The Genocide In Me (Canada, 2005)

March 18
Heaven (Germany, 2002)

April 1
The Hungry Bull (Wisconsin, 2007)

April 15
Native American Film Evening

May 6
Who’s Camus Anyway? (Japan, 2005)

May 20
The Singing Revolution (USA/Estonia, 2006)

All films are free and open to the public but suggested for mature audiences. Students, faculty, and community members are encouraged to attend.

Films begin at 7:00 p.m. in the auditorium of the Neville Public Museum.

More information on the Green Bay Film Society may be found here.