Humanistic Studies

UW-Green Bay

Page 3 of 9

Jeffreys earns NEH ‘Enduring Questions’ grant

Prof. Derek S. Jeffreys of Humanistic Studies has been awarded an “Enduring Questions” grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities.  It will fund an interdisciplinary humanities course devoted to the question, “What is Punishment?”  The course will highlight philosophical texts discussing the nature and justification of punishment and novels from South and Latin America that deal with jails and prisons.  The course will also feature public talks from speakers from Chicago who work with jail and prison inmates.

 

Lore (2012) – (in German with English subtitles) March 31st 7:00pm, Christie Theater

Directed by Cate Shortland, Lore traces the 900 km trek of five destitute siblings from southwestern Germany to their grandmother’s home near Hamburg after WW II, having been abandoned by their high-ranking Nazi parents who fled the Allied Forces. Other Germans on their journey, including a young man pretending to be a young Jewish concentration camp survivor, acquaint the children with their parents’ beliefs and the circumstantial nature of truth.

In postwar Germany, a girl whose parents have been imprisoned for their Nazi past must get her siblings to safety, with help from a Jewish runaway, in “Lore,” showing in the “Passport Germany” program at the 2013 Milwaukee Film Festival.

Summer and Fall Internships in the Humanities

To all UWGB humanities students,
 

Continue reading

Great Books Discussions schedule Fall 2014!

Please come to the Brown County Central Library on the second Tuesday of the month at 6:30 p.m. The Great Book Discussions are held in the Board Room (2nd Floor).

September 9

Apocryphal New Testament

 

Professor Brian Sutton

October 14

The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin

Professor Kevin Kain

November 11

Letters to a Young Poet and Selected Poems

Rainer Maria Rilke

Professor David Coury

December 9

Beloved

Toni Morrison

Professor Rebecca Meacham

Come on out to the Philosopher’s Cafe

Green Bay Area Philosophers’ Café – A meeting of minds

What is the Philosophers’ Café?
Faculty from UWGB and St. Norbert College are collaborating to initiate a series of Philosophers’ Cafés in the Green Bay area. Philosophers’ Cafés are public forums held at local coffee shops and pubs in which community members engage in open, friendly, and respectful dialogue in a relaxed and informal setting. We will discuss topics ranging from traditional philosophical problems to pressing contemporary issues. Topics will be introduced and discussions moderated by faculty from either St. Norbert College or UWGB.

Who should attend?
All are welcome and a diversity of views and approaches are encouraged. No formal training in Philosophy (or anything else) is required – just an interest in good questions and good conversation.

Check out this year’s schedule at: http://www.uwgb.edu/philosophers-cafe/schedule.asp

Great Books Discussions: Schedule for Fall 2013

Please come to the Brown County Central Library on the second Tuesday of the month at 6:30 p.m. The Great Book Discussions are held in the Board Room (2nd Floor).

September 10

Madame Bovary

Gustave Flaubert

 

Luisa Etxenike

October 8

The Dream of the Red Chamber/Story of the Stone

Ts’ao Hsueh-ch’in

Professor David Coury

November 12

Passing

Nella Larsen

Professor J. Vincent Lowery

December 10

The Blue Hour

Alonso Cueto

Professor Gabriel Saxton-Ruiz

Come on out to the Philosophers’ Cafe!

Green Bay Area Philosophers’ Café – A meeting of minds

What is the Philosophers’ Café?
Faculty from UWGB and St. Norbert College are collaborating to initiate a series of Philosophers’ Cafés in the Green Bay area. Philosophers’ Cafés are public forums held at local coffee shops and pubs in which community members engage in open, friendly, and respectful dialogue in a relaxed and informal setting. We will discuss topics ranging from traditional philosophical problems to pressing contemporary issues. Topics will be introduced and discussions moderated by faculty from either St. Norbert College or UWGB.

Who should attend?
All are welcome and a diversity of views and approaches are encouraged. No formal training in Philosophy (or anything else) is required – just an interest in good questions and good conversation.

Check out this year’s schedule at: http://www.uwgb.edu/philosophers-cafe/schedule.asp

 

“Humanities and the Professions” Forum!

The Humanities and the Professions

 Thursday, March 31, 2011

4:30-5:30 PM, MAC 120

Wondering what career you might enter after graduation? Are you interested in talking with professionals who were once humanities students too? Or are you hoping to explore some internship possibilities for the summer or next semester? Join us next Thursday for this short, informative gathering! Speakers include librarians, museum curators, current interns, and staff from Career Services among others!

Professor Greg Aldrete Wins a 2012-13 Fellowship from the National Endowment of the Humanities!

UW-Green Bay’s Aldrete lands second NEH fellowship on ancient Rome
Award-winning UW-Green Bay Prof. Greg Aldrete has landed yet another prestigious National Endowment for the Humanities fellowship, this time for the 2012-13 academic year. The grant will provide 12 months support for Aldrete to research and write the book Riots in Ancient Rome. He says periodic riots gave Rome a reputation for lawless violence and indicted its poor as unruly, but he argues many of the riots were in fact organized, instigated and exploited by the political and social elite. It is Aldrete’s second NEH fellowship. Currently on leave from UW-Green Bay as a postdoctoral fellow with the humanities research institute at UW-Madison, Aldrete will return to teaching in Green Bay for the 2011-12 academic year.  For more on this latest honor, click http://blog.uwgb.edu/inside/index.php/log-news/headlines/02/07/faculty-aldrete-neh-fellowship/

Upcoming Lecture September 22 at the Neville Public Museum by Professor Saxton-Ruiz at the Neville Public Museum

How to Ride the Chicken Buses of Central America, presented by Gabriel T. Saxton-Ruiz (Humanistic Studies and Spanish), Wednesday Sept 22 at 6:30 pm.

Explore the history behind refurbished U.S. school buses that find a new life in Central American countries. Join Professor Saxton-Ruiz in a discussion of the art and slogans that are painted on these buses as an expression of popular culture and as a space for traditionally marginalized groups to express themselves.

Location: the Neville Public Theater of the Neville Public Museum

« Older posts Newer posts »

© 2018 Humanistic Studies

Theme by Anders NorenUp ↑