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Jeffreys earns NEH ‘Enduring Questions’ grant

Prof. Derek S. Jeffreys of Humanistic Studies has been awarded an “Enduring Questions” grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities.  It will fund an interdisciplinary humanities course devoted to the question, “What is Punishment?”  The course will highlight philosophical texts discussing the nature and justification of punishment and novels from South and Latin America that deal with jails and prisons.  The course will also feature public talks from speakers from Chicago who work with jail and prison inmates.

 

Lore (2012) – (in German with English subtitles) March 31st 7:00pm, Christie Theater

Directed by Cate Shortland, Lore traces the 900 km trek of five destitute siblings from southwestern Germany to their grandmother’s home near Hamburg after WW II, having been abandoned by their high-ranking Nazi parents who fled the Allied Forces. Other Germans on their journey, including a young man pretending to be a young Jewish concentration camp survivor, acquaint the children with their parents’ beliefs and the circumstantial nature of truth.

In postwar Germany, a girl whose parents have been imprisoned for their Nazi past must get her siblings to safety, with help from a Jewish runaway, in “Lore,” showing in the “Passport Germany” program at the 2013 Milwaukee Film Festival.

Summer and Fall Internships in the Humanities

To all UWGB humanities students,
 

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Come on out to the Philosopher’s Cafe

Green Bay Area Philosophers’ Café – A meeting of minds

What is the Philosophers’ Café?
Faculty from UWGB and St. Norbert College are collaborating to initiate a series of Philosophers’ Cafés in the Green Bay area. Philosophers’ Cafés are public forums held at local coffee shops and pubs in which community members engage in open, friendly, and respectful dialogue in a relaxed and informal setting. We will discuss topics ranging from traditional philosophical problems to pressing contemporary issues. Topics will be introduced and discussions moderated by faculty from either St. Norbert College or UWGB.

Who should attend?
All are welcome and a diversity of views and approaches are encouraged. No formal training in Philosophy (or anything else) is required – just an interest in good questions and good conversation.

Check out this year’s schedule at: http://www.uwgb.edu/philosophers-cafe/schedule.asp

Come on out to the Philosophers’ Cafe!

Green Bay Area Philosophers’ Café – A meeting of minds

What is the Philosophers’ Café?
Faculty from UWGB and St. Norbert College are collaborating to initiate a series of Philosophers’ Cafés in the Green Bay area. Philosophers’ Cafés are public forums held at local coffee shops and pubs in which community members engage in open, friendly, and respectful dialogue in a relaxed and informal setting. We will discuss topics ranging from traditional philosophical problems to pressing contemporary issues. Topics will be introduced and discussions moderated by faculty from either St. Norbert College or UWGB.

Who should attend?
All are welcome and a diversity of views and approaches are encouraged. No formal training in Philosophy (or anything else) is required – just an interest in good questions and good conversation.

Check out this year’s schedule at: http://www.uwgb.edu/philosophers-cafe/schedule.asp

 

Professor Greg Aldrete Wins a 2012-13 Fellowship from the National Endowment of the Humanities!

UW-Green Bay’s Aldrete lands second NEH fellowship on ancient Rome
Award-winning UW-Green Bay Prof. Greg Aldrete has landed yet another prestigious National Endowment for the Humanities fellowship, this time for the 2012-13 academic year. The grant will provide 12 months support for Aldrete to research and write the book Riots in Ancient Rome. He says periodic riots gave Rome a reputation for lawless violence and indicted its poor as unruly, but he argues many of the riots were in fact organized, instigated and exploited by the political and social elite. It is Aldrete’s second NEH fellowship. Currently on leave from UW-Green Bay as a postdoctoral fellow with the humanities research institute at UW-Madison, Aldrete will return to teaching in Green Bay for the 2011-12 academic year.  For more on this latest honor, click http://blog.uwgb.edu/inside/index.php/log-news/headlines/02/07/faculty-aldrete-neh-fellowship/

Upcoming Lecture September 22 at the Neville Public Museum by Professor Saxton-Ruiz at the Neville Public Museum

How to Ride the Chicken Buses of Central America, presented by Gabriel T. Saxton-Ruiz (Humanistic Studies and Spanish), Wednesday Sept 22 at 6:30 pm.

Explore the history behind refurbished U.S. school buses that find a new life in Central American countries. Join Professor Saxton-Ruiz in a discussion of the art and slogans that are painted on these buses as an expression of popular culture and as a space for traditionally marginalized groups to express themselves.

Location: the Neville Public Theater of the Neville Public Museum

Aldrete-Bartell LInothorax Project in the News… Again

Professor Greg Aldrete and Scott Bartell’s  linothorax collaborative research project is gaining national and international attention.  During a session taped by a German news crew for a European TV series, Green bay Channel 2 and Channel 11 reported on the project:

And see Professor Aldrete shoot Scott Bartell with an arrow at Channel 2:

Full stories available at Channel 2 and Channel 11.

Aldrete wins Solmsen Fellowship

Greg Aldrete, Professor of Humanistic Studies (History), has won the Solmsen Postdoctoral Fellowship at the Institute for Research in the Humanities for the academic year, 2010-2011. This is a residential fellowship at the Institute for Research in the Humanities in Madison.

Here’s his project description:

Riots in Ancient Rome: The inhabitants of ancient Rome seem to have been a riotous lot.  For the 575-year period from 200 BC to AD 375, there are at least 154 episodes of unruly collective behavior in the city of Rome that could be considered riots (an overall frequency of 1 significant riot every 3.7 years).   The worst of these resulted in pitched battles in the streets, hundreds of deaths, widespread looting, acts of arson, and even the lynching of leading magistrates of the state.   Due to such incidents, Rome has often been characterized as a lawless and violent place, and its inhabitants, especially the poor, portrayed as disorderly and fickle.   The reality, however, is considerably more complex.   Many outbreaks were organized, instigated, and exploited not by the indigent, but rather by Rome’s political and social elites.   Furthermore, acts of violent urban collective behavior frequently occurred within the constraints of a tacit but nevertheless well-recognized set of informal societal expectations.  Finally, the motivations of those who participated were far more varied than the primary sources typically depict.  The goal of this project is to produce a scholarly book that is a comprehensive study of the riots that plagued ancient Rome during the Republic and Empire, and which not only explores their history, but also offers a more nuanced investigation of their causes, characteristics, organization, and effects.

Thomas E. Daniels Scholarship

Students are invited to apply for the annual Thomas E. Daniels Memorial Scholarship.  The deadline for applications is March 30, 2009.  Applications may be found online.

Professor Thomas E. Daniels taught in the Languages and Literatures Program at UWGB from 1968 until his untimely death in 1980.    Having earned a Ph. D. in American Studies from Washington State University, he was very well-suited to be one of the founding members of an interdisciplinary program and university.  Professor Daniels’ research focused on American literature in the 1920s and 1930s, in particular on the work of Thomas Wolfe, F. Scott Fitzgerald, and Ernest Hemingway, but his courses explored the interconnections between literature and history, sociology, economics, and philosophy.  In addition, he emphasized the importance of World Literature, noting that American culture does not exist in a vacuum.  A charismatic individual, Thomas Daniels helped define the character of the Humanities at UWGB.

GUIDELINES FOR THE THOMAS E. DANIELS MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP

  1. At the time of application or nomination, the student must have at least sophomore standing and be seeking support for full-time undergraduate study at UWGB.
  2. The student must be a declared major or minor in English or Modern Languages.
  3. The student must show an academic record of high achievement and must present statements from at least two faculty members attesting to the student’s promise for distinguished academic success and commitment to high intellectual standards.
  4. Previous winners of Crandall or Daniels cash awards are not eligible to win a further cash award although they can apply and receive Finalist recognition.  Applicants are encouraged to apply for both scholarships if they are eligible, but will only receive a cash award for one.
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