skip to content

Humanistic Studies

Category Archive: Jeffreys

Great Books Fall 2010

The Department of Humanistic Studies and the Brown County Library invite you to participate in the spring semester’s Great Books Discussion series.  On the second Tuesday of each month, a member of UW-Green Bay’s Humanitistc Studies faculty will lead a discussion on one of the “great books” of western and world culture.  The schedule for the fall semester 2010 is…

September 14, TOPIC: NATURAL LAW/RELIGION, Leviathan, Hobbe Chapters 6, 12 and 14, Presented by Professor Derek Jeffreys

October 12, TOPIC: UTOPIANISM, Utopia, Thomas More, Presented by Professor Kevin Kain

November 9, TOPIC: LATIN AMERICAN HISTORY, Open Veins of Latin America Presented by Professor Gabriel Saxton-Ruiz

December 14, TOPIC: RUSSIAN DRAMA, The Cherry Orchard, Chekov Presented by Professor Heidi Sherman

The discussions are free and open to the public.  Faculty, students, and community members are encouraged to attend.  Of course, we encourage you to read the “great book” before attending the discussion, but even if you cannot finish the work, you may find the session enlightening.

The Great Books Discussion series is held on the Lower Level of the Brown County Library (Central Branch – 515 Pine St., Downtown Green Bay).  Discussions begin at 6:30 p.m.

See you there!

Jeffreys Wins Teaching Award

Professor Dereke Jeffreys was selected as this year’s recipient of the Founders Award for Excellence in Teaching.   Colleagues and students alike express admiration that each of his courses requires direct engagement with and substantive analysis of significant issues, encouraging students to wrestle with important issues and ideas on a personal level. The citation noted that students consistently describe his courses using phrases such as “the most important I have taken during my undergraduate career,” or “the most though-provoking experience I have encountered.” Jeffreys, the author of a recent, critically acclaimed book on the ethics of torture, and a previous book on Pope John Paul II and his philosophy of human dignity, joined the UW-Green Bay faculty in 2000.