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Humanistic Studies

Category Archive: events

Kevin Soucie

French Club Soucie

 

The Grocer’s Son

Le fils de l’épicier (2007) ["The Grocer's Son"]

Tuesday, November 17th at 2p.m.
Christie Theatre
University of Wisconsin – Green Bay

It is summer, and thirty-year-old Antoine is forced to leave the city to return to his family in Provence.  His father is sick, so he must assume the lifestyle he thought he had shed—driving the family grocery cart from hamlet to hamlet, delivering supplies to the few remaining inhabitants.  Accompanied by Claire, a friend from Paris whom he has a secret crush on, Antoine gradually warms up to his experience in the country and his encounters with the villagers, who initially seem stubborn and gruff, but ultimately prove to be funny and endearing.  Ultimately, this surprise French box-office hit is about the coming-of-age of a man re-discovering life and love in the countryside. (96 min.)

“GRACEFUL.  INFLECTED WITH IMMENSE EMOTION.”
–Michelle Orange, The Village Voice – Review

“CAPTIVATING…INTOXICATING.  THIS VALENTINE TO COUNTRY LIFE IS…THAT PROVERBIAL GEM THAT ART-HOUSE FANS SHOULD DISCOVER AND SAVOR.”
–Doris Toumarkine, Film Journal International – Review

“THE GROCER’S SON IS AN UNALLOYED PLEASURE, START TO FINISH.”
–Jim Van Maanen, Green Cine – Review

A HEARTFELT TALE [WITH] SUBTLE MOMENTS OF INSIGHT RARELY CAPTURED IN MOVIES.”
–Prairie Miller, News Blaze – Review

SEDUCTIVE…IRRESISTIBLE…REMARKABLE THROUGHOUT.”
–Ronnie Scheib, Variety – Review

“Like taking a vacation to the French countryside and meeting people there of whom you grow extraordinarily fond, The Grocer’s Son is an unalloyed pleasure, start to finish.”
- Green Cine Daily

Sponsored by Le Cercle Français and the French Program of HUS unit, University of Wisconsin–Green Bay

Francophone Culture

TUESDAY 11/17

2:00—4:00 International French Film The Grocers Son in the Christie Theatre
Sponsored by the French Program and Cercle Français.

5:00—6:00 Food for Thought
Come enjoy great international food and learn firsthand what it means to be a part of the global community.
Sponsored by the Ecumenical Center and the International Club—Ecumenical Center

7:00 Kevin Soucie French Concert in the Christie Theatre
Sponsored by the Cercle Français.

 

WEDNESDAY 11/18

11:30-12:30 La Table Française avec Marie Gauvain

4:00—6:00 International Film  L’Auberge Espagnol in the Christie Theatre
Sponsored by the Spanish Program & the Spanish Club.

Faculty Forum: Spinoza’s Chunky Clumps

Spinoza’s Chunky Clumps:
Spinoza and the problem of Individuation

Professor Christopher Martin
will discuss what it is about any thing that makes it the thing that it is and not something else!

Friday, November 13
2:00-3:00 pm
University Union, Alumni A
(in back of Cloud Commons)
UW-Green Bay Campus

The Last Days of Immanuel Kant

The Green Bay Film Society will present the next International Film of the semester on Wednesday, February th at 7:00 pm in the auditorium of the Neville Public Museum.

The Last Days of Immanuel Kant
(France, 1994)

Based on an 1850s essay by Thomas De Quincey, this little-known drama chronicles a short period in life of the great professor/philosopher in his native Konigsberg, leading up to his 1804 demise at age 80. The story looks more at the great thinker’s odd, obsessive lifestyle than it does his philosophies. Kant, truly a “mad professor,” had himself on a rigid daily schedule. At night he slept in a mummy-wrap while during the day he imbibed tremendous amounts of coffee at rigidly prescribed intervals. The whole town was expected to keep a respectful distance when Kant took his daily walks. Melodrama enters the philosopher’s life after his loyal servant for the past thirty years suddenly leaves.

All are welcome to attend.

More information on the Green bay Film Society may be found here.

Great Books Spring 2009

The Department of Humanistic Studies and the Brown County Library invite you to participate in the fall semester’s Great Books Discussion series.  On the second Tuesday of each month, a member of UW-Green Bay’s Humanitistc Studies faculty will lead a discussion on one of the “great books” of western and world culture.  The schedule for the spring semester 2009 is…

February 10
Shakepeare, The Tempest
(presented by Prof. Catherine Henze, English)

March 10
Leo Tolstoy,  A Prisoner in the Caucasus
(presented by Prof. Kevin Kain, History)

April 14
Hanan Al-Shayk, Women of Sand and Myrrh
(presented by Prof. Heidi Sherman, History)

May 12
John Steinbeck, The Grapes of Wrath
(presented by Sigma Tau Delta English Honor Society)

The discussions are free and open to the public.  Faculty, students, and community members are encouraged to attend.  Of course, we encourage you to read the “great book” before attending the discussion, but even if you cannot finish the work, you may find the session enlightening.

The Great Books Discussion series is held on the Lower Level of the Brown County Library (Central Branch – 515 Pine St., Downtown Green Bay).  Discussions begin at 6:30 p.m.

International Film Series

The Green Bay Film Society, a non-profit community group dedicated to bringing international and independent films to N.E. Wisconsin, in conjunction with the Neville Public Museum of Brown County, the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay, and St. Norbert College, sponsors the Green Bay International Film Series. The following films are being screened during the spring semester, 2009:

February 4
The Last Days of Immanuel Kant (France, 1994)

February 18
Mishima (USA, 1985)

March 4
The Genocide In Me (Canada, 2005)

March 18
Heaven (Germany, 2002)

April 1
The Hungry Bull (Wisconsin, 2007)

April 15
Native American Film Evening

May 6
Who’s Camus Anyway? (Japan, 2005)

May 20
The Singing Revolution (USA/Estonia, 2006)

All films are free and open to the public but suggested for mature audiences. Students, faculty, and community members are encouraged to attend.

Films begin at 7:00 p.m. in the auditorium of the Neville Public Museum.

More information on the Green Bay Film Society may be found here.

The Scarlet Letter

The fourth Great Books Discussion will be held Monday, December 15 at 6:30 p.m. on the lower level of the Brown County Library (Central Branch – 515 Pine St., Downtown Green Bay).

Professor Bryan Vescio will lead a discussion of Nathaniel Hawthorne’s The Scarlet Letter.

Hawthorne’s best known novel is set in Puritan New England in 1620. Hester Prynne, a  awaiting her husband’s arrival from England, has an affair with the Reverend Arthur Dimmesdale. She gives birth to a daughter, but refuses to name the father.  Prynne is condemned as an adulterer and forced to wear the letter “A” on her clothing.  The novel’s  themes of adultery, guilt, and shame raise issues of importance in the contemporary world.

The discussions are free and open to the public.  Faculty, students, and community members are encouraged to attend.  Of course, we encourage you to read the “great book” before attending the discussion, but even if you cannot finish the work, you may find the session enlightening.

Literature, the Humanities, and the University

Humanistic Studies Faculty Forum:

“Literature, the Humanities, and the University:
Three Democratic Institutions”

Bryan Vescio
Professor of Humanistic Studies and English

Friday, 21 November 2008
2:30-3:330
1965 Room

Professor Vescio will present his “pragmatist” theory of literature and attempt to change the way we conceive of literature in such a way as to make it serve a modern, democratic society rather than older forms of social organization.  What is “literature”?  What makes literature distinctive within the humanities?  Where is literature situated in humanistic studies and the university?  For answers to these questions, be sure to attend the next Faculty Forum!

American Carnival

The Green Bay Film Society will present the next International Film of the semester on Wednesday, November 19th at 7:00 pm in the auditorium of the Neville Public Museum.

American Carnival
American, 2007

This film is a documentary on the lives of carnival performers (“carnies”) and the roads they travel through small-town Wisconsin.  Director Laura Stewart preserves the carnie lifestyle in this funny and sensitive work, while the carnies themselves dispel many of the myths associated with carnivals since the 1940s and 1950s.

Laura Stewart will be at the showing to intriduce and discuss her work.

All are welcome to attend.

More information on the Green bay Film Society may be found here.