Humanistic Studies

UW-Green Bay

Author: Cliff Ganyard (page 1 of 5)

Aldrete-Bartell LInothorax Project in the News… Again

Professor Greg Aldrete and Scott Bartell’s  linothorax collaborative research project is gaining national and international attention.  During a session taped by a German news crew for a European TV series, Green bay Channel 2 and Channel 11 reported on the project:

And see Professor Aldrete shoot Scott Bartell with an arrow at Channel 2:

Full stories available at Channel 2 and Channel 11.

Faculty Forum: Virginal Grandmothers and Nutty Professors

Of Virginal Grandmothers and Nutty Professors:
Social Satire in the Works of Rodolfo Santana and Juan Rivera Saavedra

Professor Gabriel Saxton-Ruiz

Friday, April 30
2:00-3:00 pm
University Union
Phoenix A
UW-Green Bay Campus

This work-in-progress lecture will discuss the major themes in two plays: Rock para una abuela virgen (1988) by the Venezuela playwright Rodolfo Santana and Los profesores (1958) by the Peruvian Juan Rivera Saavedra.  Both of these works have enjoyed an unexpected resurgence in popularity in the last few years: Santana’s social farce was recently adapted to the silver screen garnering rave reviews, while Rivera Saavedra’s previously banned absurdist commentary on Peruvian academia was finally staged in Lima three years ago.

Thomas E. Daniels Scholarship

Students are invited to apply for the annual Thomas E. Daniels Memorial Scholarship.  The deadline for applications is March 30, 2009.  Applications may be found online.

Professor Thomas E. Daniels taught in the Languages and Literatures Program at UWGB from 1968 until his untimely death in 1980.    Having earned a Ph. D. in American Studies from Washington State University, he was very well-suited to be one of the founding members of an interdisciplinary program and university.  Professor Daniels’ research focused on American literature in the 1920s and 1930s, in particular on the work of Thomas Wolfe, F. Scott Fitzgerald, and Ernest Hemingway, but his courses explored the interconnections between literature and history, sociology, economics, and philosophy.  In addition, he emphasized the importance of World Literature, noting that American culture does not exist in a vacuum.  A charismatic individual, Thomas Daniels helped define the character of the Humanities at UWGB.

GUIDELINES FOR THE THOMAS E. DANIELS MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP

  1. At the time of application or nomination, the student must have at least sophomore standing and be seeking support for full-time undergraduate study at UWGB.
  2. The student must be a declared major or minor in English or Modern Languages.
  3. The student must show an academic record of high achievement and must present statements from at least two faculty members attesting to the student’s promise for distinguished academic success and commitment to high intellectual standards.
  4. Previous winners of Crandall or Daniels cash awards are not eligible to win a further cash award although they can apply and receive Finalist recognition.  Applicants are encouraged to apply for both scholarships if they are eligible, but will only receive a cash award for one.

Coryl Crandall Scholarship

Students are invited to apply for the annual Coryl Crandall Memorial Scholarship.  The deadline for applications is March 30, 2010.  Applications may be found online .

Professor Coryl Crandall taught in the Humanistic Studies and Languages and Literatures Programs at UWGB from 1968 until his untimely death in 1978.  Professor Crandall served as Assistant Dean of the College of Creative Communication, the purpose of which was to examine the problem of human identity and the individual’s impact on the environment.  His primary academic interest was in Renaissance and Restoration English drama, but his interests were wide-ranging and included contemporary drama and world drama as well.  His first love, however, was acting.  In his youth, he had participated in the avant-garde productions of Harry Partch, and he was very active as both actor and director in student theater, community theater, and educational television, including such productions as Cat on a Hot Tin Roof, The Lion in Winter, and Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead.  An inspiring teacher and mentor, Coryl Crandall helped define the character of the Humanities and the Arts at UWGB.

GUIDELINES FOR THE CORYL CRANDALL MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP

  1. At the time of application or nomination, the student must have at least sophomore standing and be seeking support for full-time undergraduate study at UWGB.
  2. The student must be a declared major or minor in Arts and Visual Design, Humanistic Studies, one of their disciplinary majors, or a related personal major.
  3. The student must show promise of distinguished academic achievement.
  4. Coryl Crandall’s work was identified with the college more than with a single program.  Moreover, his commitment was especially to students who can reach across traditional academic disciplines and rise above the limitations of the classroom.  Therefore, the student should have a record of well-rounded achievement and potential, and be undertaking academic work that involves contributions to the student’s immediate community within the university or the wider community of northeastern Wisconsin or beyond.
  5. Previous winners of Crandall or Daniels cash awards are not eligible to win a further cash award although they can apply and receive Finalist recognition.  Applicants are encouraged to apply for both scholarships if they are eligible, but will only receive a cash award for one.

Aldrete-Guided Linothorax Project in the News

The Discovery Channel recently reported on Professor Greg Aldrete’s linothorax faculty/student collaborative research project.  The poster referred to was designed by UWGB graduate Scott Bartell (history and humanistic studies) and last week won the Best Poster Prize at the Annual Meeting of the Archaeological Institute of America. More info, including the poster and video, can be found on the project’s website.

The Pope’s Toilet

The Green Bay Film Society will present the next International Film of the semester on Wednesday, December 2nd at 7:00 pm in the auditorium of the Neville Public Museum.

The Pope’s Toilet
Uruguay, 2007

In 1988, Melo, an Uruguayan town on the Brazilian border, awaits the visit of Pope John Paul II. 50,000 people are expected to attend, and the most humble locals believe that selling food and drink to the multitude will just about make them rich. Petty smuggler Beto thinks he has the best idea of all—he decides he will build a WC in front of his house and charge for its use.  His efforts bring about unexpected consequences, and the final results will surprise everyone.

All are welcome to attend.

More information on the Green bay Film Society may be found here.

Lockard’s Last Lecture

“Crossing Borders: Disciplines, Cultures, and Histories”

 A lecture by Craig Lockard

November 19, 3:30
Christie Theatre, University Union, UWGB

 Please join Social Change and Development as we honor our retiring colleague Craig Lockard. Professor Lockard has served the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay as a dedicated teacher, scholar, and institutional and intellectual leader. To our benefit, he has also served the larger academy and intellectual world as a distinguished historian and theoretician of world history.

Co-sponsored by the History Department and the Center for History and Social Change. Please contact Kim Nielsen at nielsenk@uwgb.edu with questions or if accommodations are needed.

Emma’s Bliss

The Green Bay Film Society will present the next International Film of the semester on Wednesday, November 18th at 7:00 pm in the auditorium of the Neville Public Museum.

Emma’s Bliss
Germany, 2006

Max, a car salesman, has been diagnosed with cancer and faced with the knowledge that he doesn’t have much longer to live. He impulsively steals money and a car and sets out to flee. By chance he encounters Emma, an eccentric young woman who lives alone on a farm with a different conception of life and death. Director Sven Taddicken’s odd and wondrous film about death and dying pointedly contrasts Western medicine’s sometimes intrusive approach to prolonging life by any means necessary with a graceful acceptance of the inevitable.

All are welcome to attend.

More information on the Green bay Film Society may be found here.

Kevin Soucie

French Club Soucie

 

The Grocer’s Son

Le fils de l’épicier (2007) [“The Grocer’s Son”]

Tuesday, November 17th at 2p.m.
Christie Theatre
University of Wisconsin – Green Bay

It is summer, and thirty-year-old Antoine is forced to leave the city to return to his family in Provence.  His father is sick, so he must assume the lifestyle he thought he had shed—driving the family grocery cart from hamlet to hamlet, delivering supplies to the few remaining inhabitants.  Accompanied by Claire, a friend from Paris whom he has a secret crush on, Antoine gradually warms up to his experience in the country and his encounters with the villagers, who initially seem stubborn and gruff, but ultimately prove to be funny and endearing.  Ultimately, this surprise French box-office hit is about the coming-of-age of a man re-discovering life and love in the countryside. (96 min.)

“GRACEFUL.  INFLECTED WITH IMMENSE EMOTION.”
–Michelle Orange, The Village Voice – Review

“CAPTIVATING…INTOXICATING.  THIS VALENTINE TO COUNTRY LIFE IS…THAT PROVERBIAL GEM THAT ART-HOUSE FANS SHOULD DISCOVER AND SAVOR.”
–Doris Toumarkine, Film Journal International – Review

“THE GROCER’S SON IS AN UNALLOYED PLEASURE, START TO FINISH.”
–Jim Van Maanen, Green Cine – Review

A HEARTFELT TALE [WITH] SUBTLE MOMENTS OF INSIGHT RARELY CAPTURED IN MOVIES.”
–Prairie Miller, News Blaze – Review

SEDUCTIVE…IRRESISTIBLE…REMARKABLE THROUGHOUT.”
–Ronnie Scheib, Variety – Review

“Like taking a vacation to the French countryside and meeting people there of whom you grow extraordinarily fond, The Grocer’s Son is an unalloyed pleasure, start to finish.”
– Green Cine Daily

Sponsored by Le Cercle Français and the French Program of HUS unit, University of Wisconsin–Green Bay

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