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Humanistic Studies

Great Books Discussions schedule Fall 2014!

Please come to the Brown County Central Library on the second Tuesday of the month at 6:30 p.m. The Great Book Discussions are held in the Board Room (2nd Floor).

September 9

Apocryphal New Testament

 

Professor Brian Sutton

October 14

The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin

Professor Kevin Kain

November 11

Letters to a Young Poet and Selected Poems

Rainer Maria Rilke

Professor David Coury

December 9

Beloved

Toni Morrison

Professor Rebecca Meacham

Come on out to the Philosopher’s Cafe

Green Bay Area Philosophers’ Café – A meeting of minds

What is the Philosophers’ Café?
Faculty from UWGB and St. Norbert College are collaborating to initiate a series of Philosophers’ Cafés in the Green Bay area. Philosophers’ Cafés are public forums held at local coffee shops and pubs in which community members engage in open, friendly, and respectful dialogue in a relaxed and informal setting. We will discuss topics ranging from traditional philosophical problems to pressing contemporary issues. Topics will be introduced and discussions moderated by faculty from either St. Norbert College or UWGB.

Who should attend?
All are welcome and a diversity of views and approaches are encouraged. No formal training in Philosophy (or anything else) is required – just an interest in good questions and good conversation.

Check out this year’s schedule at: http://www.uwgb.edu/philosophers-cafe/schedule.asp

Great Books Discussions: Schedule for Fall 2013

Please come to the Brown County Central Library on the second Tuesday of the month at 6:30 p.m. The Great Book Discussions are held in the Board Room (2nd Floor).

September 10

Madame Bovary

Gustave Flaubert

 

Luisa Etxenike

October 8

The Dream of the Red Chamber/Story of the Stone

Ts’ao Hsueh-ch’in

Professor David Coury

November 12

Passing

Nella Larsen

Professor J. Vincent Lowery

December 10

The Blue Hour

Alonso Cueto

Professor Gabriel Saxton-Ruiz

Come on out to the Philosophers’ Cafe!

Green Bay Area Philosophers’ Café – A meeting of minds

What is the Philosophers’ Café?
Faculty from UWGB and St. Norbert College are collaborating to initiate a series of Philosophers’ Cafés in the Green Bay area. Philosophers’ Cafés are public forums held at local coffee shops and pubs in which community members engage in open, friendly, and respectful dialogue in a relaxed and informal setting. We will discuss topics ranging from traditional philosophical problems to pressing contemporary issues. Topics will be introduced and discussions moderated by faculty from either St. Norbert College or UWGB.

Who should attend?
All are welcome and a diversity of views and approaches are encouraged. No formal training in Philosophy (or anything else) is required – just an interest in good questions and good conversation.

Check out this year’s schedule at: http://www.uwgb.edu/philosophers-cafe/schedule.asp

 

“Humanities and the Professions” Forum!

The Humanities and the Professions

 Thursday, March 31, 2011

4:30-5:30 PM, MAC 120

Wondering what career you might enter after graduation? Are you interested in talking with professionals who were once humanities students too? Or are you hoping to explore some internship possibilities for the summer or next semester? Join us next Thursday for this short, informative gathering! Speakers include librarians, museum curators, current interns, and staff from Career Services among others!

Professor Greg Aldrete Wins a 2012-13 Fellowship from the National Endowment of the Humanities!

UW-Green Bay’s Aldrete lands second NEH fellowship on ancient Rome
Award-winning UW-Green Bay Prof. Greg Aldrete has landed yet another prestigious National Endowment for the Humanities fellowship, this time for the 2012-13 academic year. The grant will provide 12 months support for Aldrete to research and write the book Riots in Ancient Rome. He says periodic riots gave Rome a reputation for lawless violence and indicted its poor as unruly, but he argues many of the riots were in fact organized, instigated and exploited by the political and social elite. It is Aldrete’s second NEH fellowship. Currently on leave from UW-Green Bay as a postdoctoral fellow with the humanities research institute at UW-Madison, Aldrete will return to teaching in Green Bay for the 2011-12 academic year.  For more on this latest honor, click http://blog.uwgb.edu/inside/index.php/log-news/headlines/02/07/faculty-aldrete-neh-fellowship/

Upcoming Lecture September 22 at the Neville Public Museum by Professor Saxton-Ruiz at the Neville Public Museum

How to Ride the Chicken Buses of Central America, presented by Gabriel T. Saxton-Ruiz (Humanistic Studies and Spanish), Wednesday Sept 22 at 6:30 pm.

Explore the history behind refurbished U.S. school buses that find a new life in Central American countries. Join Professor Saxton-Ruiz in a discussion of the art and slogans that are painted on these buses as an expression of popular culture and as a space for traditionally marginalized groups to express themselves.

Location: the Neville Public Theater of the Neville Public Museum

Aldrete-Bartell LInothorax Project in the News… Again

Professor Greg Aldrete and Scott Bartell’s  linothorax collaborative research project is gaining national and international attention.  During a session taped by a German news crew for a European TV series, Green bay Channel 2 and Channel 11 reported on the project:

And see Professor Aldrete shoot Scott Bartell with an arrow at Channel 2:

Full stories available at Channel 2 and Channel 11.

Faculty Forum: Virginal Grandmothers and Nutty Professors

Of Virginal Grandmothers and Nutty Professors:
Social Satire in the Works of Rodolfo Santana and Juan Rivera Saavedra

Professor Gabriel Saxton-Ruiz

Friday, April 30
2:00-3:00 pm
University Union
Phoenix A
UW-Green Bay Campus

This work-in-progress lecture will discuss the major themes in two plays: Rock para una abuela virgen (1988) by the Venezuela playwright Rodolfo Santana and Los profesores (1958) by the Peruvian Juan Rivera Saavedra.  Both of these works have enjoyed an unexpected resurgence in popularity in the last few years: Santana’s social farce was recently adapted to the silver screen garnering rave reviews, while Rivera Saavedra’s previously banned absurdist commentary on Peruvian academia was finally staged in Lima three years ago.

Aldrete wins Solmsen Fellowship

Greg Aldrete, Professor of Humanistic Studies (History), has won the Solmsen Postdoctoral Fellowship at the Institute for Research in the Humanities for the academic year, 2010-2011. This is a residential fellowship at the Institute for Research in the Humanities in Madison.

Here’s his project description:

Riots in Ancient Rome: The inhabitants of ancient Rome seem to have been a riotous lot.  For the 575-year period from 200 BC to AD 375, there are at least 154 episodes of unruly collective behavior in the city of Rome that could be considered riots (an overall frequency of 1 significant riot every 3.7 years).   The worst of these resulted in pitched battles in the streets, hundreds of deaths, widespread looting, acts of arson, and even the lynching of leading magistrates of the state.   Due to such incidents, Rome has often been characterized as a lawless and violent place, and its inhabitants, especially the poor, portrayed as disorderly and fickle.   The reality, however, is considerably more complex.   Many outbreaks were organized, instigated, and exploited not by the indigent, but rather by Rome’s political and social elites.   Furthermore, acts of violent urban collective behavior frequently occurred within the constraints of a tacit but nevertheless well-recognized set of informal societal expectations.  Finally, the motivations of those who participated were far more varied than the primary sources typically depict.  The goal of this project is to produce a scholarly book that is a comprehensive study of the riots that plagued ancient Rome during the Republic and Empire, and which not only explores their history, but also offers a more nuanced investigation of their causes, characteristics, organization, and effects.