Nutritional Wellness

Nutritional wellness is the ability to take in and utilize any food material to get the proper nourishment that a person needs. This involves a person’s ability to adequately study the different food groups and assess the different portions that are required for an individual. Overall, having nutritional wellness is the starting point that needs to be achieved in order to succeed in other areas of wellness.

April Wellness Webinar: Clean and Simple Nutrition

WebinarApril

Looking to clean up your eating habits? This webinar will provide an overview of nutrition and detail the basics so you can improve and simplify your eating habits, resulting in a healthier, happier you!

Date: Wednesday, April 19, 2017

Time: 12:00 to 1:00 p.m.

Location: Cofrin Library, 7th floor, room 735

No need to RSVP – just mark your calendar to join us, and bring your lunch!

You could also participate in this webinar at your workstation if you prefer – please visit wellwisconsin.staywell.com and go to Webinars to register.

Wellness webinars highlighting various health and well-being topics will take place the 3rd Wednesday of each month. All webinars will be recorded and available to Well Wisconsin Program participants on the wellness portal after the event date.

To access the wellness portal, you must be an employee, retiree, or enrolled spouse/domestic partner enrolled in the State of Wisconsin or Wisconsin Public Employers Group Health Insurance Program.

How to Make Kombucha Lunch n’ Learn held on March 22nd

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Do you know what SCOBY is?  Well, we not only learned that it is an essential part of making Kombucha, but also got to see the SCOBY up-close and smell it!  Kombucha is a fermented tea drink typically made with tea, sugar, bacteria and yeast, which may provide health benefits.  Jolene Sell, Registered Dietitician with Chartwells, gave us simple step-by-step instructions how to brew your own Kombucha, as well as samples of different flavors of Kombucha to try.  For those of us who haven’t tried Kombucha before, we were pleasantly surprised how good it tasted – especially Jolene’s home brewed peach vanilla flavor!  Thank you to Jolene Sell and Chartwells for this interesting and fun lunch ‘n learn!

Kroc Center Lunch ‘n Learn held on March 8th

Kroc

Thank you to Laurel and Nick from the Kroc Center for visiting their alma mater on Wednesday, March 8th to talk with us about Nutrition, Fitness and the Kroc Center!  Laurel shared information about nutrition, such as asking for dressing, gravy and cream sauce on the side when dining out (so you can control how much you use).  Did you know that some small bags of chips are actually two servings, so we would need to double the amount per serving on the nutrition label (i.e. calories, fat, cholesterol, sodium) if we eat the whole bag?  Have you heard about substituting applesauce for half the called-for butter, shortening or oil in recipes to make it healthier?  She also explained that 3,500 calories equals about one pound of fat, so we would need to burn about 3,500 calories more than we take in to lose one pound.  In general, if we cut 500 calories from our typical diet each day, we’d lose about one pound per week!  Laurel also made peanut butter energy balls for us to enjoy!

Nick shared interesting information about the Green Bay Kroc Center, which is one of 26 Kroc Centers nationwide, funded by a generous donation from Joan Kroc, wife of McDonald’s founder Ray Kroc.  The Green Bay Kroc Community Center opened in 2011, and offers a fitness center, aquatics center, gym with indoor track, group fitness classes, swim lessons, art and music classes, youth dance lessons, senior classes, youth day camp, and an after school program. UWGB employees can receive 15% off monthly membership costs, a free two week trial membership, and a waived registration fee because UW-Green Bay is part of the Corporate Connections Program. Please see their website for more information.

Smart Spring Snacking

Snacking

With the spring season coming and a warm, sunny summer following, kicking your butt into gear and eating healthy is more important than ever! Many times, eating healthy every day can be an overwhelming thought for those with tight schedules and a list of commitments, which, let’s face it, includes just about all of us!  One of the best things you can learn to help you stay on track throughout your crazy days are quick and easy tips for grab-and-go healthy food choices, or what one may call Smart Snacking!

Yes! Snacking CAN be healthy for you! But the first tip to keep in mind before reading on is that portion size is key!  A snack can easily turn into the same calories as a meal if you eat too much at once.  Your goal for snacks should be 200-300 calories or less.  Tips to help you achieve this include pre-filling small snack baggies and storing them in your cupboard or refrigerator (limit yourself to this serving size!), portioning out a small bowl of your snack choice rather than just eating out of the original container, and selecting healthy substitutes for less healthy snacks you are craving.  For example, substitute 1 cup of unsalted popcorn or a small bowl of whole-grain crackers instead of potato chips, or choose ¼ cup of homemade trail mix with dried fruit and nuts instead of a candy bar.  Also, avoid eating out of boredom or for emotional reasons, which can often lead to eating more than you need to.  Instead, go for a walk, hang out with a friend, or find a hobby you enjoy.

Here are some more quick and healthy snack ideas to help you achieve your wellness goals:

  • Always have sliced or chopped vegetables and fruits set aside to quickly grab.
  • Choose hummus, low-calorie dressing, or peanut butter for dipping rather than higher-fat, higher-calorie dipping sauces.
  • Include fruits and vegetables on your grocery shopping list that involve minimal preparation, such as apples, pears, bananas, fruits canned in their own juice, baby carrots, or cherry tomatoes. Always have these on hand for fast healthy fuel on-the-go.
  • Top low-fat cottage cheese with fresh, frozen, or canned fruit.
  • Drink a glass of milk or non-dairy substitute for a quick snack. These choices contain quality protein, fortified with calcium and vitamin D, and will keep you feeling satisfied between meals.
  • Grab a slice of low-sodium deli meat such as chicken or turkey and wrap around low-fat string cheese, an apple slice, or carrot stick.
  • Roast kale or thinly sliced beets in the oven to make vegetable chips to munch on (or try the roasted chickpea recipe below!).
  • Mash avocado with a scoop of salsa, and use as a dip for low-fat baked tortilla chips.
  • Soak steel-cut oats in hot water or milk for 2-3 minutes and top with dried or fresh fruit.
  • Heat low-fat cheese on a whole-wheat tortilla. Wrap and dunk in bean dip or salsa.
  • Make a mini-pizza from a toasted English muffin, spaghetti sauce, chopped vegetables, and low-fat mozzarella cheese. Heat in microwave for 45-60 seconds to melt the cheese, and enjoy!
  • Freeze Greek yogurt and top with fresh, frozen, or canned fruit for a sweetly satisfying and nutritious snack.
  • Have a carton of hard-boiled eggs set aside for quick protein on-the-go!
  • Keep pantry-protein staples in your cupboard at all times for quick, nutritious, and filling snacks. Examples include nuts, seeds, nut butters, and tuna. Make trail mix out of nuts and seeds with dried fruit and dark chocolate. Use peanut butter for dipping with apples, whole-grain crackers, or celery sticks. Dip whole-grain crackers or fresh veggie sticks in tuna salad made with low-fat mayo.

Check out the recipe below for an easy, tasty, fiber-packed snack!

Sources:

USDA. 10 Tips: MyPlate Snack Tips for Parents. ChooseMyPlate.gov. 2016. Available at: https://www.choosemyplate.gov/ten-tips-snack-tips-for-parents. Accessed February 12, 2017.

Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Smart Snacking for Adults and Teens. Eat Right Food, Nutrition and Health Tips from the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. 2017. Available at: http://www.eatright.org/~/media/eatright%20files/nationalnutritionmonth/handoutsandtipsheets/nutritiontipsheets/smartsnackingforadultsandteens.ashx. Accessed February 12, 2017.

Article provided by Caela Stenske, UWGB Dietetic Intern

Four-Ingredient Crispy Roasted Chickpeas

Chickpeas

  • One 15-ounce can chickpeas (also called garbanzo beans)
  • 1 ½ T olive oil
  • Spices of your choice (see spice blend recipes below for ideas!)
  • Optional: ¼- ½ tsp salt

Instructions:

  1. Preheat oven to 400°F.
  2. Drain can of garbanzo beans in a strainer and rinse. Shake off the excess water. Spread beans onto a paper towel. Top with another paper towel, and gently press to absorb water.
  3. Drizzle the chickpeas with olive oil and toss. Roast for 30-40 minutes until the beans are golden brown and crunchy. Take care not to burn them!
  4. Season with your choice of spice blend.

One serving (1/3 cup) is only 110 kcals!

FUN FACT: Chickpeas are the main ingredient in hummus and are a great source of plant protein and dietary fiber!

Spice blend suggestions:

Taco: chili powder, cumin, garlic powder, onion power, oregano, paprika, ground pepper

Curry: paprika, cumin, fennel, ground mustard, coriander, turmeric, cinnamon

Italian: basil, oregano, rosemary, thyme, garlic powder

Cajun: paprika, garlic powder, black pepper, onion powder, cayenne, oregano, thyme

Ranch: parsley, dill, garlic powder, onion powder, basil, pepper

Lemon pepper: lemon zest, ground pepper

TIP: Use these savory blends to season up cooked vegetables or fresh stovetop popcorn!

Roasted chickpea recipe source: Hair J. Crispy Roasted Chickpeas (Garbanzo Beans) Recipe. Steamy Kitchen Cooking Shortcuts. Available at: http://steamykitchen.com/10725-crispy-roasted-chickpeas-garbanzo-beans.html. Accessed February 12, 2017.

Spice blends recipe source: 14 Homemade Spice Blends. Wellness Mama. 2016. Available at: https://wellnessmama.com/4430/homemade-spice-blends/. Accessed February 12, 2017.

Recipe provided by Caela Stenske, UWGB Dietetic Intern

Samosa Stuffed Peppers

StuffedPeppers

Brown rice, lentils, chickpeas, and nuts combine in this dish to make a complete protein-packed meatless dish loaded with fiber, vitamins, and antioxidants, and low in fat! Serve this dish alongside sautéed vegetables to create a nutritious, delicious, and well-balanced meatless main entrée.

  • 4 large red bell peppers, seeded and cut in half
  • 2 Tablespoons vegetable oil
  • 1 large onion, chopped
  • 4 teaspoons curry powder
  • 1 Tablespoon garam masala
  • 2 teaspoons grated fresh ginger
  • 1 cup brown rice
  • ¼ cup red lentils, rinsed and drained
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • One 15-oz can of chickpeas, rinsed and drained
  • 2 large carrots, diced
  • 1 cup green beans, chopped
  • ½ cup unsalted peanuts or cashews, chopped
  • ½ cup raisins or dried currants (optional)

Instructions:

  1. Preheat oven to 350°F. Place bell pepper halves cut side down into two large baking dishes. Cover with foil, and bake 25 minutes.
  2. Heat vegetable oil in a large saucepan over medium heat. Add onion and sauté 3-5 minutes. Add curry powder, garam masala, and ginger, and cook 1 minute. Stir in brown rice, lentils, salt, and 4 cups water. Add chickpeas, carrots, green beans, and raisins. Cover, and bring to a boil. Reduce heat to medium-low, and simmer 15 minutes, or until most of the liquid is absorbed, stirring occasionally. Remove rice mixture from the heat, stir in nuts.
  3. Flip bell pepper halves. Fill each pepper half with ¾ cup rice mixture. Re-cover baking dishes, and bake for 15 minutes. Uncover, and bake 5-10 minutes more. Serve warm.

Makes 8 servings.

Recipe source: Chappell MM. Samosa Stuffed Peppers. Vegetarian Times. March, 2014;40(410):72.

Recipe provided by Caela Stenske, UWGB Dietetic Intern

How to Make Kombucha Lunch ‘n Learn

Jolene Sell, Registered Dietitian with Charwells, will present a lunch ‘n learn on Wednesday, March 22nd on How to Make Kombucha!  Kombucha is a fermented tea drink typically made with tea, sugar, bacteria and yeast, which may provide health benefits.

Date: Wednesday, March 22, 2017

Time: 12:00 to 12:45 p.m.Tea

Location: University Union, 1965 Room

Please RSVP at the following link: http://uwgreenbay.qualtrics.com/SE/?SID=SV_6rOQbXCYAjHPq9T

Jolene Sell will provide small samples of kombucha to attendees, and feel free to bring your lunch too!

 

Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) Available to UWGB Employees

 

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Thank you to Suzi Sevcik of Sleepy Hollow Farm & CSA for visiting UW-Green Bay on February 7th to share information about Community Supported Agriculture (CSA)! CSA is a partnership between a farm and a local community of supporters that provides a direct link between the production and consumption of food. CSA members cover the farm’s operating cost by purchasing a share of the harvest. This provides members with a healthy supply of locally grown, seasonally fresh produce during the growing season.

Sleepy Hollow Farm & CSA is a small, farmer owned farm in Kewaunee County. They specialize in growing a variety of veggies using sustainable farming practices, and no chemicals, herbicides or pesticides touch your food.  The 2017 summer shares will last for 10 weeks – from mid-July to September.  For more information about CSA’s or to sign up for Suzi’s CSA (that may be delivered to campus again this year if enough people sign up), please visit the Sleepy Hollow Farm & CSA website at http://www.sleepyhollowfarmcsa.com/.  Don’t wait to sign-up – Suzi has a limited number of spots which fill-up quickly!

Foods to Avoid During Pregnancy

Pregnant

Eat this! Don’t eat that! Pregnancy is an exciting time but knowing what foods are safe to eat can cause confusion for a lot of women. There is an abundance of information being thrown around that can make it even more overwhelming. Knowing exactly what foods to avoid can take the burden away and help women prepare for their upcoming addition.

One of the most controversial foods for pregnant women is seafood.  There is some belief that pregnant women should not eat any but the USDA recommends that pregnant women eat at least 8 ounces of seafood a week and no more than 12 ounces. However, it is important to choose the right kinds of seafood. The environment where the fish come from has an affect on the amount of methyl mercury that may be found in fish. It is always beneficial to check with the DNR for a guide on healthy fish to eat in a specific area. Mercury found in fish can cause damage to the baby’s developing brain, which is why it is so important to avoid foods that are high in it. Always avoid swordfish, shark, king mackerel or tilefish. Pregnant women should also avoid smoked seafood and raw fish, such as sushi due to food borne illnesses or food poisoning. “White” tuna or albacore is safe in small amounts but no more than 6 ounces a week should be consumed.

Other foods that pregnant women should be mindful of include any kind of raw meat. Undercooked beef or poultry should be avoided because of the risk of foodborne illnesses. Lunch meats and hot dogs are also foods that should be avoided. These may contain Listeria, which can cause miscarriages, stillbirths, or other serious health problems. It is advised that if pregnant women are going to consume lunch meats they should heat them until they are steaming. Soft cheeses made from unpasteurized milk should also be avoided. Brie, feta, Roquefort, or queso blanco are all examples of these. Raw vegetable sprouts are another food item to stay away from. Bacteria can easily exist in raw sprouts such as alfalfa, clover radish, or mung bean sprouts.

Another food item to consider with caution when pregnant is raw eggs. Some foods such as Caesar dressing, mayonnaise, hollandaise sauce, and homemade custards or ice cream may contain raw eggs without the consumer even knowing. Usually if these foods are commercially made they will be cooked at some point or made with pasteurized eggs but it is best to always double check.

What a person chooses to eat or drink will always directly affect their health. Pregnant women need to take the extra step or precaution to make sure that what they are eating is safe for not only themselves but for their baby too.

Article by Melanie Jaecks, UWGB Dietetic Intern

Should I Take a Supplement?

Supplements

Vitamins and minerals are essential nutrients, meaning that we must get them from our diets. They are important in many bodily functions such as growth, reproduction, and physiologic processes. Not consuming enough can result in deficiencies that can lead to permanent damage.

In general, the best sources for these nutrients are the foods that we eat. By eating a variety of foods from each main food group, you can ensure that you are getting a sufficient amount of these nutrients along with all the other benefits of eating a varied diet which include other important nutrients such as fiber, phytochemicals, and antioxidants. Getting vitamins and minerals from food can also improve the bioavailability (or degree to which they can be absorbed) of the nutrients.

While most populations can get a sufficient amount of vitamins and minerals from food, there are some who may benefit from taking a supplement. These populations include those who are going through periods of growth or repair, such as pregnant or lactating women, those who have diets that restrict certain food groups such as meats, dairy, or grains, those of advanced age, or those who have certain medical conditions that may decrease the absorption or increase the need of certain vitamins and minerals. These should be treated on a specific nutrient basis and not by a multivitamin or mineral supplement. Taking a vitamin or mineral supplement of a specific nutrient missing from your diet will prevent deficiency of that nutrient. Those who restrict total calories for weight loss or other purposes or those who have low appetites may benefit from a multivitamin or mineral supplement to cover the range of nutrients missing from their diet.

The large amount of other vitamins and minerals in a multi-supplement can be detrimental to the absorption of other vitamins and minerals, or when taken incorrectly over a period of time could lead to toxicity. Another issue related to supplement use is the question of purity and dosage of the supplement. These products are not heavily regulated and may contain other contaminants or a different actual dosage than what is advertised on the bottle.

Consuming a variety of foods should ensure proper vitamin and mineral intake along with other important nutrients for most populations. If you are someone with a restricted diet, have increased needs or decreased absorption due to age, medical condition, or period of growth, you may benefit from taking either a specific nutrient supplement or a multivitamin from a reputable processor.

Article by Alyssa Blume, UWGB Dietetic Intern