Nutritional Wellness

Nutritional wellness is the ability to take in and utilize any food material to get the proper nourishment that a person needs. This involves a person’s ability to adequately study the different food groups and assess the different portions that are required for an individual. Overall, having nutritional wellness is the starting point that needs to be achieved in order to succeed in other areas of wellness.

Cooking demo held October 3rd

Pizza JoleneSell AppleOatmealOnaBudgetCrop

Thank you to Jolene Sell, Registered Dietician with Chartwells and Sydney Keidl, Nutrition Intern, for presenting a cooking demonstration for us on Tuesday, October 3rd about “Healthy Eating on a Budget”!  We enjoyed delicious samples of apple cinnamon overnight oats, turmeric-ginger marinated chicken, pesto-prosciutto flatbread and gluten-free apple cheddar cheese toast.  Mark your calendar for their next cooking demo on Tuesday, November 7th at Noon!

Benefits & Wellness Fair held October 5th

HealthInsBoothsETFboothChiropracticBoothPicCustodiansHerbLifeBoothReflexologyBoothWellnessBoothWaterTASCbooth

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The annual Benefits & Wellness Fair was held on Thursday, October 5th and over 200 employees and retirees attended.  A big thank you to the more than 40 vendors who were on hand to help us with our benefits and wellness questions!

Healthy Potluck

Please join us for the annual healthy potluck on Friday, October 6th!  Bring your favorite healthy dish to pass and your recipe to share, and we’ll enjoy a healthy lunch together!  Tableware and water will be provided.

When: Friday, October 6, 2017 at Noon

Where: Room 125, University Union

Please click here to RSVP by Thursday, October 5th.

Sponsored by the Wellness Committee.

eating3 Caprese salad

Do you have a favorite recipe that you wish was healthier?

EmilyBurger

Hello, my name is Emily Burger and I am a senior here at UW-Green Bay studying Nutrition. I am an intern for the UWGB Wellness Committee. I love to bake and cook and I am always looking for new recipes to try. Sometimes I come across recipes that sound really good, but may not be the healthiest. I then use that recipe as the base, but then make some substitutions or use less of certain ingredients. If you have recipes that you are interested in making or have recipes that you have used for years but would like to make them healthier, email wellness@uwgb.edu the recipe and I will make some substitutions for you! I’ll also include why it’s healthier and explain some of the nutritional information behind it. A few simple changes can make a big difference!

Cooking 101: Healthy Eating on a Budget

AppleLeafJoin us to learn about eating better on a budget!  We will present a cooking demonstration with free samples!

Date: Tuesday, October 3, 2017

Time: Noon to 1:00 p.m.

Where: Heritage Room (University Union)

Hosted by: Jolene Sell, Registered Dietitian and Sydney Keidl, Nutrition Intern

Please RSVP to sellj@uwgb.edu

 

October Wellness Webinar: Understanding Health Values

By now, you’ve participated in your health screening as part of the Well Wisconsin incentive program. Join us to learn more about what the numbers mean and how you can maintain or improve them for your overall health and well-being.

Date: Wednesday, October 18, 2017HealthNumberA

Time: 12:00 to 1:00 p.m.

Location: Cofrin Library, 7th floor, room 735

No need to RSVP – just mark your calendar to join us, and bring your lunch!

You could also participate in this webinar at your workstation if you prefer – please visit wellwisconsin.staywell.com and go to Webinars to register.

Wellness webinars highlighting various health and well-being topics will take place the 3rd Wednesday of each month. All webinars will be recorded and available to Well Wisconsin Program participants on the wellness portal after the event date.

To access the wellness portal, you must be an employee, retiree, or enrolled spouse/domestic partner enrolled in the State of Wisconsin or Wisconsin Public Employers Group Health Insurance Program.

See What You Know About Fruits and Veggies

Whether you heard it from your parents, your doctor, a government agency, or any number of media outlets, you are most likely familiar with the fact that fruits and vegetables are good for you. Here’s your chance to show the world (or just yourself) how much you know about the health benefits of produce.Quiz

Questions

1. True or false: When a fruit or vegetable has a vivid color that means it’s not as good for you.

2. When you’re prepping fruits and vegetables to eat, which of these precautions should you take to ensure they’re clean and won’t make you sick?

  • A. Wash your hands before handling produce
  • B. Rinse produce with warm water—even if you don’t eat the skin or peel
  • C. Cut away bruised or damaged areas before eating
  • D. All of the above

3. Which of these is not a proven health benefit of eating fruits and vegetables?

  • A. It boosts your mood.
  • B. It strengthens your immune system.
  • C. It improves your hearing.
  • D. It improves your psychological health.

4. True or false: It’s possible that eating fruits and vegetables helps prevent cell damage in your body.

Answers

1. False. In fact, vivid colors mean the produce is full of chemicals like carotenoids and flavonoids, which contain good-for-you antioxidants.

2. D—All of the above. If the produce has a firm skin, you should use a scrub brush to clean it.

3. C—It improves your hearing. Sadly, this hasn’t been found. But you should still eat a lot of produce, because the other three health benefits have been proven.

4. True. The antioxidants that are prevalent in produce might help combat a process in your body that triggers cell damage.

Article from The StayWell Company, LLC

Sugar; Too Much of a Bad Thing

This title is misleading, I don’t believe that any food should be labeled “bad” or even labeled “good”. There are foods that have more nutrients than others, like vegetables and fruits, compared to the nutritional profile of a cookie. The reason a cookie would be labeled “bad” is because of the high sugar content, which is fine in moderation, but when eaten too often, it can become a bad thing.

Sugar can come in different forms. Monosaccharides are the simplest forms of sugar, including, glucose, galactose, and fructose. Fruits and vegetables contain fructose, which is the most common monosaccharide. Disaccharides are made when two monosaccharides are joined. Sucrose, which is glucose and fructose, is the most common disaccharide and is the type found in table sugar. Lactose is the type of sugar in milk products and is glucose and galactose joined together. Monosaccharides and disaccharides are simple carbohydrates. Polysaccharides have multiple glucose chains and are complex carbohydrates. Starch is an example of a polysaccharide.

Healthy, well-rounded diets can contain broccoli and brownies, just more broccoli than brownies. Sugars in fruit and vegetables are naturally occurring and are metabolized more efficiently because they also contain lots of fiber, vitamins, and minerals. The fiber slows down the digestion, which keeps insulin and blood sugar levels stable. Sugar found in cookies, soda, and candy causes insulin and blood sugar levels to spike rapidly because there is no fiber or protein to stabilize these levels or to keep you full. Eat a mix of complex and simple carbohydrates.Chocolate_cake

Eating a variety of foods is part of life, including foods that have sugar. Enjoying one piece of cake at a birthday party is not going to harm you, as long as the rest of your diet includes lots of vegetables, fruits, whole-grain products, lean proteins, and dairy products that aren’t loaded with added sugar or fat. Eat the cake, just have it once in a while!

Article provided by Emily Burger, UWGB Dietetics Student

Sources: Johnson, R. K., Appel, L. J., Brands, M., Howard, B. V., Lefevre, M., Lustig, R. H., Wylie-Rosett, J. (2009). Dietary Sugars Intake and Cardiovascular Health: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association. American Heart Association, Inc., 120(11).    doi:https://doi.org/10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.109.192627