Tag Archives: Teaching

Photo of Billie HOLIDAY

Singin’ The Textbook Blues

As I get nearer to the end of the semester (hard to believe) by necessity I am setting my sights on Spring, 2015. I am bringing a group of students to South Africa during the January Interim and so I must get my syllabi completed early (not my typical modus operandi) before I travel. And that leaves me to face one of my pedagogical demons on what to do about a textbook. Continue reading

Rippleys Math Equation

To Sum It All Up

Mathematics Senior Lecturer, Theresa Adsit, shares thoughts on her CATL Teaching Enhancement Grant funded project…

Having enjoyed the benefits of having randomized, computer generated homework problems available to assign to my Calculus and Intermediate Algebra students, I wanted to extend those same benefits to my Elementary Functions: Algebra and Trigonometry Math 104 students.  Continue reading

at the circus

Innovative Teaching & Cirque du Soleil

The Annual Conference for the International Society for the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (ISSOTL) was held in Quebec City last month. I had the privilege during this conference to hear a plenary from Bernard Petiot who is the Vice-President for Casting and Performance for Cirque du Soleil. He spoke on the environment that welcomes creativity at Cirque du Soleil and Continue reading

glases3

Don’t Sweat the Small Stuff and Know What the Small Stuff Is

When teaching, there is a diverse array of factors that an instructor has to be aware of. On a class to class basis you have to be sure that you have the right amount of content, that you provide opportunities for active learning and that you build in factors to increase engagement. When it comes to more of the minutia of class management, an instructor also has to make a lot of decisions in advance about what the norms for appropriate classroom behavior will be. These can range from behaviors more directly related to learning and attention such as the use of laptops, texting, and attendance, to factors such as eating and talking to neighbors, which may not be as directly tied to attention. Continue reading