Tag Archives: Mentoring



Written by Vanya Koepke, Student

In the fall of 2014 a group of nine students and four professors came together to put together a capstone for the Political Science major. Often, opportunities like that do not materialize. Students might be intimidated by working with their professors. Faculty, on the other hand, might be tempted to work by themselves, a much quicker way to come up with a syllabus. In hindsight, the benefits of such collaboration were so profound that they could convince others to try it. For the students involved in the process it was a unique opportunity to be mentored by Dr. Weinscheink, Dr. Staudinger, Dr. Helpap, and Dr. Levintova. Overall, this blog will focus on the importance of faculty and student collaboration, while identifying the challenges and benefits of the process. Continue reading


The Power of What We Can Do

P. H. D.

Three little letters. On their own, they don’t look all that impressive. Once you learn a little about their significance, though, you find that those three little letters mean a great deal. A Ph.D. is the highest academic degree. As such, it takes years of intensive study to earn one. With an introduction like that, you might get the impression that I wrote this blog post to brag about the prestige of a Ph.D. That’s not at all what this is about, as you’ll see below. Continue reading

Are You My Mother?

Are you my Mentor?

For most of my life, I was the one being mentored – by my parents, friends, faculty. It all began to change when I entered the job market. I had two monumental transitions in my life – getting my first university job and becoming a parent. As I gave my research presentation during the on-campus interview, I could feel my son kicking, but my journey of teaching self-examination and change has only just began. In retrospect, as I was learning to be a parent, I was also learning to be a teacher, and, ultimately a mentor. Continue reading