Category Archives: Faculty Life

PreservationHall

Learning about Teaching in an Unexpected Place

Written by Aaron Weinschenk, Assistant Professor of Political Science

This past January, I got the chance to see the Preservation Hall Jazz Band while I was visiting New Orleans. It was awesome. Preservation Hall is legendary and the music is glorious. During the concert, I marveled at how engaging the band was. Afterwards, I started thinking about what the performance could teach me about being a better professor. Just to be clear, I didn’t attend the concert with the intention of gleaning insights about teaching. But, as I reflect back on what I witnessed, it occurs to me that a lot of the things that I observed could help me become a better and more thoughtful teacher. Continue reading

Rainbow

Staying Positive in Negative Times

Written by Illene Cupit, Professor of Human Development

A couple of weeks ago the Human Development department’s faculty meeting hosted Chancellor Miller, who spent 1 ½ hours going over the current state of UW-Green Bay’s fiscal crisis. And so my dear colleagues, I do not have to tell you that it currently is not a pretty picture.  The requirement of wringing out $4.6 million dollars from a lean budget does not provide cause for celebration.  We all are concerned about tenure, hiring, maintaining faculty lines in the face of retirements and program offerings.  Morale on campus is at its nadir. Continue reading

springbreak

Spring Break – A Time to Revitalize

Written by Dana Mallett, CATL Office Program Assistant

By March most, if not all, of us are very ready for a break.  The gap between winter break and spring break can feel like an eternity and being in a cold climate often makes the days leading up to summer feel even longer.  Whether you are planning a trip somewhere far away and warm, to curl up on your couch watching Netflix, or just enjoy a quieter work week on campus – here are a few ways to utilize this week off to prepare for the final months of the semester.

Don’t overschedule yourself

Using this break to catch up on all the things that have been put to the side as you are putting out the daily fires of the semester can seem like a great idea. But try to do it in moderation…as much as a week can allow.  If you stuff all the things that need to be done in this week there will be no time to stop and enjoy the quieter, more relaxed atmosphere on campus.

Try to sleep a little more

That might be easier said than done, but maybe one day this week sleep in a little later. If you are lucky enough to be at home this week, sneak in a 20-minute (or 2-hour – no judgment) nap. Our students have it right – naps are golden and can work miracles to reenergize you. Don’t have a lot of time to catch a nap? That’s ok, according to the Journal of Sleep Research, a 10-minute nap “improved subjective and objective alertness, decreased fatigue, increased vigor, and improved performance.”1

Step away from the screen

Most of us spend a good amount of time in front of our computer/laptop/iPad in order to perform our work duties.  Stepping away from the computer screens may seem counter-intuitive in our effort to have a productive work week, but maybe a break from your screen is exactly what you need to get some work done. Stepping away might allow for the time to really think deeply about your goals for the remainder of the semester.  Maybe there are some research articles or book that you have been setting aside since the beginning of the semester. Or maybe you just really want to catch up on the latest magazine of choice.  Whatever it is – take a day and step away from the screen. You might be surprised at how much time it frees up.

Connect with family or friends

At some point in adult life, getting away and spending time with a friend or loved one can seem like a task that needs to be carefully planned out as to not neglect one of the many responsibilities you may have on your plate. While the students are off campus there might be a little more time to take the lunch hour to connect with a colleague, or to stay out a little later enjoying dinner with your family, knowing you don’t have to be 100% on point in front of a class at 8:00 a.m. the next day.  The relaxed atmosphere of the campus during this week can allow a little more flexibility in how you spend time outside of the work hours.  We all aren’t able to head to Puerto Vallarta this week, but maybe head over to El Sarape and catch dinner and a margarita with a friend.

Prepare

Reflect on the semester so far and where you want the next couple of months to go. What have you addressed to date? What still needs to be covered? What are the overall learning objectives of your courses and do you feel that the students are going to meet those by May? The second half of the semester can go by pretty fast and keeping everyone focused can feel like herding cats at times – but May will be here before we know it!

Hopefully you have had a chance to take some time for yourself and enjoy the spirit of Spring Break.  Do you have any tried and true ways to make sure you return to school after break feeling refreshed and ready to face the end of the school year?

Sources:
1. http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1365-2869.2008.00718.x/full

Dana MallettDana Mallett
Program Assistant
CATL Office

EMC2

Setting a Good Example: Physics Problem Solving

Written by Heidi Fencl

I’m sure I’m not alone in teaching a field that is more about “how” than it is about “what.”  And so I think a lot about teaching by example.  There is a great deal of research in physics education about setting a good example in class as we teach physics process, but of course most physics learning happens outside the classroom when students work on their homework assignments.  And that is where I worry about practices that set a bad example. Continue reading

math

Opportunities to Learn – Joint Mathematics Meetings

Written by Megan Olson Hunt

For my fall 2014 Teaching Enhancement Grant, I attended the Joint Mathematics Meetings in San Antonio, Texas over four days in January (most of which weren’t much warmer than the weather in Green Bay, but I did see a touch of sun, thankfully!). In that time, I managed what now seems like a bit of a feat, going to 45 presentations, each of which lasted anywhere from 15 minutes to four hours. Continue reading

Writing

The Value of a Writing Community

Written by Sawa Senzaki

I attended the Society for Teaching Psychology’s Annual Conference on Teaching in Atlanta, Georgia in October 2014. The conference is also known as the Best Practices Conference, and it’s a great place to learn new pedagogical techniques practiced in my own discipline. Although this conference included many interesting topics, my primary agenda was to attend the workshop on the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL).

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FDC15

That’s So HIP! Part Two

Come join us in just over a week at our annual faculty development conference. We are excited for the opportunity to learn, grow, and share as we explore High Impact Practices (HIP) with our keynote speaker, Peter Felten. Anyone working with students is encouraged to attend and if you haven’t registered its not too late!

In preparation for the conference, we have created a two part blog series highlighting the upcoming presenters and their breakout sessions. This is part two and it will highlight study abroad HIP and course specific HIP presentations. Continue reading

FDC15

That’s So HIP! Part One

Come join us in just over a week at our annual faculty development conference. We are excited for the opportunity to learn, grow, and share as we explore High Impact Practices (HIP) with our keynote speaker, Peter Felton. Anyone working with students is encouraged to attend and if you haven’t registered its not too late!

In preparation for the conference, we will be sharing a two part blog series highlighting the upcoming presenters and their breakout sessions. Part one will cover general HIP presentations followed by part two which will highlight study abroad HIP and course specific HIP presentations.

We hope to see you there!

Continue reading