Category Archives: Online

QM Process

Hook, Line & Sinker at Quality Matters

“Charting the Course”, “Navigating the Currents of Change”, “Set Sail on a Course Tour”, “A Voyage through QM”.

The harbor-based puns (and subsequent groaning) came hard and fast at the 6th Annual Quality Matters Conference held in Baltimore, which I was lucky enough to attend and present at in September. The conference attracts faculty, designers and administrators from across the county to learn more about Quality Matters and it is a great opportunity for CATL to learn more about the process, share our progress and network with institutions with similar goals. Continue reading

71

Don’t be the 71%

By the time you are standing in front of a classroom of students, ready to teach for the first time, you have probably spent at least 20 years on the other side of the lectern. You have sat through years of wonderful, inspired teaching, and probably an equal amount of less than exhilarating lectures. You have taken hundreds of tests, submitted literally tons of homework and skipped months of classes. You stand there with the benefit of an ‘Apprenticeship of Observation’[1] having become an expert in teaching through exposure.

Did you feel as prepared the first time you taught an online class?

Continue reading

Lamu, Kenya: Electricity Corporation Suggestion Box by Flickr user Lindsay Bremner

Mid-Semester Surveys

One of the most frequent comments I hear about teaching online is how hard it is to know how it’s going. Without those physical cues of light-bulb smiles, slouching students or confused faces, it can feel that you’re teaching into a vacuum for 14 weeks. And whatever your opinion of online CCQs, the results arrive too late to impact the students in front of you now. If you’ve shared this frustration, consider offering your students an informal mid-semester survey. Continue reading

1933 - Grandma's 10th grade report card - Strum, WI by Rev. Xanatos Satanicos Bombasticos

Online Student Success

As a faculty member and an advisor I often get students asking me about whether or not they could be successful in online courses. The answer is usually, “yes,” with several qualifiers such as, “as long as you can effectively manage your time,” or “as long as you can stay motivated to do your best throughout the course.” These are often my thoughts, rather than solid research-based answers. Continue reading

Writing

Informal Writing Assignments

In November 2012, Maryellen Weimer of The Teaching Professor at Faculty Focus, discussed Writing Across the Curriculum, and in particular, the benefits of informal writing. In addition to improving writing skills, integrating writing assignments into your curriculum also promotes learning – “it clarifies ideas, generates reasons, and crystallizes arguments”. Continue reading