Category Archives: CATL Stuff

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Not Your Mother’s Course …

“You and your group are walking in the woods when you find a bloody, unconscious young woman. You look through the backpack, you discover a two-way radio and a gas-mask. Her arm is wounded and looks badly infected but from this distance you can’t tell if it’s a bite or not. She’s starting to wake up. Work with your group to decide what to do.”

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Photo of Billie HOLIDAY

Singin’ The Textbook Blues

As I get nearer to the end of the semester (hard to believe) by necessity I am setting my sights on Spring, 2015. I am bringing a group of students to South Africa during the January Interim and so I must get my syllabi completed early (not my typical modus operandi) before I travel. And that leaves me to face one of my pedagogical demons on what to do about a textbook. Continue reading

Rippleys Math Equation

To Sum It All Up

Mathematics Senior Lecturer, Theresa Adsit, shares thoughts on her CATL Teaching Enhancement Grant funded project…

Having enjoyed the benefits of having randomized, computer generated homework problems available to assign to my Calculus and Intermediate Algebra students, I wanted to extend those same benefits to my Elementary Functions: Algebra and Trigonometry Math 104 students.  Continue reading

at the circus

Innovative Teaching & Cirque du Soleil

The Annual Conference for the International Society for the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (ISSOTL) was held in Quebec City last month. I had the privilege during this conference to hear a plenary from Bernard Petiot who is the Vice-President for Casting and Performance for Cirque du Soleil. He spoke on the environment that welcomes creativity at Cirque du Soleil and Continue reading

Encourage

The Power of What We Can Do

P. H. D.

Three little letters. On their own, they don’t look all that impressive. Once you learn a little about their significance, though, you find that those three little letters mean a great deal. A Ph.D. is the highest academic degree. As such, it takes years of intensive study to earn one. With an introduction like that, you might get the impression that I wrote this blog post to brag about the prestige of a Ph.D. That’s not at all what this is about, as you’ll see below. Continue reading

Vintage picture of female school teachers sitting in classroom

Myth of the Gender Neutral Classroom

Many of my female faculty colleagues probably experienced being addressed as Mrs. or Ms. at least once every semester and not just by incoming freshmen. Or they read comments about shoes in their end-of-semester evaluations. But are those isolated incidents or does gender matter in how students perceive the knowledge and expertise of an instructor? Do they see differences in pedagogies? Types of course work that male and female faculty assign? Do students find female instructors more relatable? Do they themselves behave differently in the classrooms of male and female instructors? Last academic year, I finally got a chance to collect data on several of these research questions as part of our Teaching Scholars Program. Continue reading