Category Archives: CATL Stuff

71

Don’t be the 71%

By the time you are standing in front of a classroom of students, ready to teach for the first time, you have probably spent at least 20 years on the other side of the lectern. You have sat through years of wonderful, inspired teaching, and probably an equal amount of less than exhilarating lectures. You have taken hundreds of tests, submitted literally tons of homework and skipped months of classes. You stand there with the benefit of an ‘Apprenticeship of Observation’[1] having become an expert in teaching through exposure.

Did you feel as prepared the first time you taught an online class?

Continue reading

American Gothic

The History of CATL

In 2008 the Center for the Advancement of Teaching and Learning (CATL) was officially formed. CATL was established in response to a recommendation made by the Task Force on Teaching Evaluation in fall 1998, a Faculty Development Council proposal submitted to the Academic Affairs Team in spring 1999, the recommendation of the Comprehensive Academic Program Review Task Force in fall 2006, and the receipt of initial funding to support the Center through the UW-Green Bay Growth Initiative.  Continue reading

Professor Advising Students

How hard is advising?

When I was first starting out as a professor students would ask me questions I just found ridiculous. Like, did they need to take a particular art history course. I thought, geez, take what the catalogue tells you to take! I didn’t always comprehend that a major or minor could have options, there could be confusion, and that the students themselves maybe didn’t know who else to ask those questions of. No, I thought, as the professor, their questions for me should be strictly limited to class content! Everything else was, “See your advisor.” And the advisor was never going to be me. Continue reading

Simpsons, Spring Break

Spring OPID Meeting

While the weather outside did not feel like Spring, the recent Office of Professional and Instructional Development (OPID) Council meeting focused on exciting Spring programming that is available to faculty across the UW System.  I wanted to take this opportunity to give you a little background on OPID, as well as share with you some of the programs OPID offers that, perhaps, you might this year (or in the near future) like to get involved in. Continue reading

Signature by Flickr user Losinpun

Have you written lately?

I was sitting down with my undergraduate research assistants today to discuss current data we needed to analyze and it became amazing that there were some very interesting trend emerging.  We didn’t get the entire analysis complete, but we got a nice start to it.  Luckily I didn’t have to sigh after they left and wonder when I will next get to working on that project…I already know: Thursday at 9am at our Encouraging Writing Group. Continue reading

cheats

Students Do What With Pencils and Bottles?

Cheating never crossed my mind when I was a student. Not once while in grade school, high school or college.  In my mind you don’t cheat, you just don’t go there.  In fact, my sophomore year in high school I walked into my health class and saw there were numbers with associated letters written in pencil on the desk.  I freaked out! Were these the answers to that day’s quiz?  I could not have erased them fast enough! Continue reading

Whistling Vivaldi

Bookclub Review: Whistling Vivaldi

Every semester, CATL sponsors a bookclub to discuss books that broadly impact teaching, learning and life on campus. Fall 2013 saw an invested group of faculty and staff discussing Whistling Vivaldi, an insider’s view into Claude M. Steele’s research and groundbreaking findings on stereotypes and identity. Dr. Gaurav Bansal offered this review of the book.

In Whistling Vivaldi Claude Steele describes that no one is immune from the threat or fear of being stereotyped – that is the fear of what other people could think about us solely because of our race, gender, age, etc. Claude talks about the series of creative experiments he has carried out where he deliberately induced or cleverly removed the stereotype threat. The book shows that the fear of being stereotyped hinders our performance – and it affects each group differently. It affects African Americans on test of intellectual abilities, as it hinders the Math performance of female students among others. The findings presented in this book unearth the powerful and prevalent ways in which group identity affects us all. Every one of us is part of some group affected by negative perceptions and stereotype threats. The awareness of this commonality should help us reconcile with the experiences of others around us.

Copies of Steele’s book are available from the CATL library in IS1144. Interested in suggesting a book or joining us for the Spring Bookclub? Email us at catl@uwgb.edu