All posts by folsoms

research3

Council on Undergraduate Research (CUR) Summit

WiSCUR: The Wisconsin Council on Undergraduate Research

A few weeks ago I mentioned that I would be attending a Council on Undergraduate Research (CUR) Summit in Washington, D. C. to learn with individuals from several other State Systems and Consortia about how best to institutionalize undergraduate research.  I, along with the representatives of the other UW System schools, was delighted to meet with individuals from campuses across the following Systems/Consortia: the California State University System, the City University of New York, the Council on Pubic Liberal Arts Colleges (COPLAC), the Great Lakes Colleges Association (GLCA), as well as from the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education.  As you can see, there were a variety of types of schools (large, small, public, private, etc.) that joined in the discussion about how to strategically foster undergraduate research on our campuses. Continue reading

breakfastattiffany's

Observing In The Classroom

As a part of my responsibilities as Faculty Consultant for CATL, I was required to observe and conduct a peer evaluation of our new faculty members.  Truly this was the best experience of this position!  For the uninitiated, the instructor fills out a detailed pre-observation form detailing class objectives and the activities to attain those objectives.  Space for the goals of the course as well as current concerns is also provided. Continue reading

American Gothic

The History of CATL

In 2008 the Center for the Advancement of Teaching and Learning (CATL) was officially formed. CATL was established in response to a recommendation made by the Task Force on Teaching Evaluation in fall 1998, a Faculty Development Council proposal submitted to the Academic Affairs Team in spring 1999, the recommendation of the Comprehensive Academic Program Review Task Force in fall 2006, and the receipt of initial funding to support the Center through the UW-Green Bay Growth Initiative.  Continue reading

Professor Advising Students

How hard is advising?

When I was first starting out as a professor students would ask me questions I just found ridiculous. Like, did they need to take a particular art history course. I thought, geez, take what the catalogue tells you to take! I didn’t always comprehend that a major or minor could have options, there could be confusion, and that the students themselves maybe didn’t know who else to ask those questions of. No, I thought, as the professor, their questions for me should be strictly limited to class content! Everything else was, “See your advisor.” And the advisor was never going to be me. Continue reading

"The Nutty Professor," Jerry Lewis

The Importance of Research on Campus

The Importance of URSCA on Campus

While the term “URSCA” might not be a familiar term, many faculty know the importance of undergraduate research in their teaching and learning (and often scholarship!) endeavors.  The Council on Undergraduate Research (CUR) recognizes this as well.  CUR is a national organization based in Washington D.C., that has a mission to support and promote high-quality undergraduate student-faculty collaborative research and scholarship. Continue reading

Simpsons, Spring Break

Spring OPID Meeting

While the weather outside did not feel like Spring, the recent Office of Professional and Instructional Development (OPID) Council meeting focused on exciting Spring programming that is available to faculty across the UW System.  I wanted to take this opportunity to give you a little background on OPID, as well as share with you some of the programs OPID offers that, perhaps, you might this year (or in the near future) like to get involved in. Continue reading

Chimney

Pulling Off the Multiplier Effect

As I was preparing my first First Year Seminar, Denise Bartell offered me a bit of advice: she said, “the only difference between a high school senior and a college freshman is a summer.” I think her point was that I should set realistic expectations, both for the students and myself, but her advice also made me realize that I really have no idea what my students expect. Are they taking my class just to fill some University requirement? Are they actually interested in the topic? And what on Earth do they hope do with all of this knowledge? Continue reading