Vault’s Top Internships for 2015!

Written by Frank Siano from Vault.com

Did you know that 40 percent of all full-time hires in the U.S. are sourced through internship programs? This means that, for those looking to work for the most desired and admired employers in the country, internships are no longer a luxury but a necessity. That is why the Career Services at the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay is providing all students with free access to these trusted rankings!

Vault administered its Internship Experience Survey earlier this year to approximately 5,800 interns at 100 different internship programs. As part of the survey, on a scale of 1 to 10, with 10 being the highest, respondents were asked to rate their internship experiences in five areas: quality of life, compensation and benefits, interview process, career development, and full-time employment prospects. These ratings were averaged to determine an overall score for each program and develop a Top Ranking.

internship-image

Step 1: Login to your college/universities Vault Access Link.

Step 2: If you are an existing user, please enter your log in credentials under the “Please Log In” section. If you forgot your password or don’t know if you are a current user, click on the “Forgot Password?” link and follow the steps to resetting your account. If this is your first time to Vault, click on the “Create My Vault Account” link to register.

Step 3: Customize your account! We urge you to create a profile to the best of your capability to get viewed by top employers & recruiters, tailor your content, and apply for jobs and more.

Step 4: Get Started Now! Don’t delay, access Vault today. Check with your Career Center / Library for information on best using Vault. Feel free to search additional information such as our Vault Tutorial Video within our Support Center. Happy searching!

Vault

What I Did During My Summer Vacation

Grades have been submitted, Memorial Day has come and gone… it’s true, summer is officially here. Perhaps you’re still in recovery mode. Maybe you’re just starting to think about what you’ll do over the next few months. Many students may not realize “How Summer Can Change Your Future.” 

In The Wall Street Journal article written by Brett Arends, he addresses research that was conducted by Economic professors from the University of Wisconsin-La Crosse, the University of Pennsylvania and Auburn University.  I encourage you to read the article, as it gives a glimpse of what employers consider when reviewing candidates. To sum it up, what gave fictitious candidates the edge?  Their academic major?  Their GPA?  Nope. It was their summer internship. Noted in the article – “Candidates whose resumes could point to pregraduation work experience in the industry they were applying for were 14% more likely to get an interview. An English major with a middling GPA and a summer internship in a bank was more likely to get a job interview at a bank than an outstanding finance major who spent the summer touring Europe.” 

If you haven’t quite planned out your summer, it doesn’t mean you should throw in the towel. While many employers may have already hired their summer interns, there may be circumstances that have created last-minute openings – or – an employer may be seeking a part-time or summer/seasonal employee that would allow a student to gain experience in an industry or position of interest. Use the various resources available to you through Career Services. Log into your Phoenix Recruitment On-Line (PRO) account to search for positions. Career Services is open throughout the summer; you can call to make an appointment to have a staff member review your resume and/or cover letter or discuss your internship/job search strategy or go through a practice interview. Our website with links to various resources and information is available 24/7. Even if you aren’t able to secure an internship for summer, you may find opportunities for the fall.

Taking action today can help you later as you prepare to enter the competitive job search process.

Advice from the Alumni

Written by Tina Norman, Human Resources Manager at GENCO

Congratulations on your impending graduation! As you think about your college career coming to an end and beginning the next chapter of your life with a “real job”, who better to get some advice from than UWGB Alumni?

As a large employer in Green Bay, I had the opportunity to sit down with nine of our UWGB Alumni to get their thoughts on some common questions college students may have as they enter the next chapter.

When should a college student begin looking for full-time employment?
Don’t wait too long! At a minimum, begin researching the companies that interest you during the summer before your graduating year. As the fall semester arrives, begin to narrow your search. By the end of that semester, we recommend sending your resume to prospective employers or networking through alumni connections that you found in your search the prior summer.

How do I begin a career search?
Begin your search with companies that are natural fits to your field of study. Pay attention to the location and job market within that geographical area. We cannot stress enough the importance of networking and LinkedIn makes it easier than ever. If you know someone who works/interns at the company you have interest in, ask for their feedback. If you have an opportunity yourself to intern there, take advantage of this as early as you can within your college career.

What can I do to learn about a company’s culture to ensure it’s where I want to work?
There are many ways to learn about a company’s culture to include researching them on the internet, Facebook, and LinkedIn. We recommend applying to multiple companies. Time is of the essence as graduation, believe it or not, it will come very quickly! If you get multiple interviews, great! Not only will this give you good practice and help you gain confidence in your interviewing skills, you may also have options to choose from in the end. Remember to also use your career resources at UWGB – they do a wonderful job at helping you be prepared.

As interviewers yourselves, what do you look for in a candidate during the interview?
First of all, the first impression is critical. Many interviewers will form an initial impression within the first few minutes of meeting you. It’s important to have a clean, professional personal appearance, eye contact, and a firm handshake to show confidence. When asked to “tell me about yourself”, be sure to have your thoughts organized. More importantly, remember to be specific, but brief. As you proceed with the interview, use specific examples to help the interviewer get to know you. At the end, be prepared with questions for the interviewers…you are interviewing the company as much as they are interviewing you. For example, consider asking your interviewer about their experiences at the company – what do they like best? What does a typical day look like? What keeps them up at night? It’s always good to ask about key factor metrics for the role and seek to understand the company’s three-year strategy.

We’d be remiss if we didn’t comment on the resume. A resume should be well written with no spelling or grammar errors. As you highlight your education and work experience, be sure to keep in mind the job description of the position you are applying for. Highlight your experiences that compliment the skills your potential employer is looking for. For example, if you were interested in a position at GENCO, we are looking for people who are motivated, a self-starter, and able to balance multiple tasks. Don’t be afraid to list student groups and activities that you’ve participated in on your resume to “beef up” your work history.

When given a job offer, what should I consider as I make my decision to accept, counter, or decline?
Many people look at the salary, but there is so much more to a job offer. Our advice is to consider the entire compensation package which includes base salary, benefits, bonuses, culture, work/life balance, training, and career opportunities.

What final advice do you have for graduating students?
As you begin your job search, be open-minded. Take some time to reflect upon what is important to you. Rank the top 5 things that are most important to you such as location, commute, culture, pay, benefits, etc. As you begin your career, you will notice that you will spend a lot of time at work. It’s important to take the time up front to do your research to find the right company for you.

Good luck!

Are you showing up for the right interview?

Written by Abby Despins, Corporate Communication Manager at Schreiber Foods.

The day is finally here. You’ve spent months perfecting your resume, creating cover letters and following up with potential employers. And now you’ve gotten the most coveted call among all job seekers … the recruiter asking for an interview. Most students will jump for joy and then wait patiently until the day of the interview. This is one of the biggest mistakes you can make in your job search. The hard work really starts now: preparing for the interview.

Before you hang up the phone with the recruiter, make sure you know what interview style the company uses. Some recruiters will offer up this information, others will not. Either way, don’t hang up without knowing what interview you’re showing up for.

Why? What many students don’t know is that there are several types of interviews. The company’s interview style will drastically change how you prepare. The most common include:

Structured and Patterned Interviews
Also called a repetitive interview, in structured interviews, potential employers ask every applicant the same questions to ensure that similar data is collected from all candidates.

Similarly, in patterned interviews, also called targeted interviews, interviewers ask each applicant questions that are targeting the same knowledge, skill or ability. Unlike structured interviews, questions can vary from applicant to applicant.

If you’re headed into a structured or patterned interview, ask the recruiter for some sample interview questions they may ask, or research potential questions online.

Behavioral Interviews
Behavioral interviews focus on identifying a specific situation and evaluating how the interviewee handled it. The theory here is that an interviewee’s past behavior will predict future behavior if they were to work for their company. Potential employers find these interviews valuable because they get to see the candidate thinking, solving and acting. They’ll ask you to tell them about situations you’ve handled in the past, such as:
• Give an example of how you set goals and achieve them.
• Give an example of how you worked on a team.
• Describe how you’ve handled a difficult situation.

In this method, you should use a STAR method to answer behavioral-based questions.
• S/T= Situation/Task: Paint a high level picture of what the situation looked like and then describe the context or background of the situation or task.
• A= Action: Describe what you did or did not do in that situation and how was it done. The majority of your answer should focus on your actions.
• R= Results: Describe what the end result of that situation was.

To prepare for behavioral interviews, think about some examples before the interview. How did you handle the situation? Who was involved? What was the outcome? Be prepared enough to give specific details about your experiences that demonstrate your knowledge, approach and personality.

Situational Interviews
Similar to behavioral interviews, this method tries to predict future behavior. The Interviewer will ask questions to elicit stories and examples that demonstrate skill and qualification levels. What differentiates situational interviews from behavioral interviews is that in situational interviews the interviewer will ask hypothetical questions (i.e. how would you handle this situation), such as:
• You have a deadline approaching and fear you will be unable to meet it. What do you do?
• A co-worker frequently leaves early when the boss is not around, and asks you to cover for him. What would you do?
• How would you handle it if you believed strongly in a recommendation you made in a meeting, but most of your co-workers shot it down?

In the interview, take the opportunity to weave in past experiences as you answer situational questions.

At Schreiber, we use a combination of behavioral-based and structured interviews. This means that we ask all candidates the same questions and look for previous examples on how they handled a situation. We’ve seen great success with this interview style and we can tell who’s prepared to give us examples of successes and challenges they’ve encountered throughout their careers – whether they have 20 years of experience, or classroom experience.

For more information about interviews, I encourage you to visit the UW-Green Bay Career Services’ resources page on interviewing. And as you’re planning to land your next interview, take a look at the careers we offer at Schreiber and get a peek into the Schreiber culture by connecting with us on Facebook and LinkedIn.

Network For Your Job Search

Courtesy of the National Association of Colleges and Employers.

Networking could be what helps you land a job.

If you take part in social networking sites, you probably have a pretty good idea of how networking can enhance your personal life. But, if you’re like many new college graduates, you’re probably not as comfortable about incorporating networking into your job search.

In spite of your discomfort, you need to incorporate networking into your job search: Especially in a competitive job market, networking could be what helps you land a job. In fact, many jobs are filled before they are even advertised—filled by people who learned about the opportunity before it was formally announced.

What is networking when it comes to the job search? It’s not about using people. Just as you look to build personal relationships through social networks, you want to build relationships to foster your professional life. These relationships can help you not only in your current job search but down the road as you build your career.

Networking is not one-sided: It works both ways. You offer assistance to others just as they offer assistance to you. Perhaps the easiest way to think about networking is to see it as an extension of being friendly, outgoing, and active.

Here are some tips for building and maintaining a healthy network:

  1. Make a list of everyone you know—and people they know—and identify how they could help you gather career information or experience.
    Who do you know at school? Professors, friends, and even friends’ parents can all be helpful contacts. Did you hold a part-time job? Volunteer? Serve an internship? Think about the people you came into contact with there.
  2. Sign up for an alumni mentoring program.
    Many colleges offer such programs, and they are a great way to build relationships in your field.
  3. Join the campus chapter of a professional society that relates to your career choice.
    In many ways, a professional society is an instant network: You’ll be with others who have the same general career interest. Plus, you may be able to learn more about your field from them. For example, you may be able to learn about the field and potential employers from others who share their internship experiences.
  4. Volunteer at a local museum, theater, homeless shelter—anywhere that even remotely relates to your field of study.
    By volunteering, you’ll not only learn about your chosen field firsthand, you’ll also be able to connect with people who are in the field.
  5. Speak to company representatives at career fairs, even if you’re not ready to look for a job.
    Be up front that you’re not currently in the job market and don’t take a lot of the representative’s time, but touching base with a potential employer now can help you down the road when you are ready.
  6. Attend company information sessions at your college and talk one-on-one to the recruiters who run them.
  7. Schedule informational interviews with people who can tell you about their careers.
    It’s best to ask to meet in person or by phone for a short interview, and don’t immediately start asking “How can you help me?” Plan your questions ahead of time, focusing on how the company works and how the person shaped his or her career path.
  8. Add your profile to LinkedIn.
    It’s free. And then, work your profile. Add work history (including internships!), skills, and keywords. Make connections to people you’ve worked with or met through networking. Ask for “recommendations” from people who have worked with you. You’ll find LinkedIn is a good source of suggestions for people in your field to contact for informational interviews.
  9. Remember to be courteous and tactful in all your conversations, to send thank-you notes to people who help you, and to find ways to help others as well.
    Don’t drop your network once you’ve gotten a job. Nurture the relationships you’ve built and look for opportunities to build new connections throughout your career. Getting started might be uncomfortable, but with time and practice, networking will be second nature.

Common Career Pitfalls to Avoid

Written by Robert Brookman, Talent Acquisition Department with Humana

Within our robust college recruiting program, we see a lot of mistakes and pitfalls that college students regularly fall into during their career search. These are things that may seem like common sense, but over the course of time become less of a priority. The strategy any student should take into a job search is to make sure first and foremost; they do not disqualify themselves because of a minor mistake. Often times in recruiting, the first cut of candidates is made because of minor mistakes such as grammar, spelling, formatting, etc. We want to put you as a job seeker, in the best place to succeed in your impending search. That’s why we have compiled the following list of common pitfalls to steer clear of.

1.  I can begin looking for a job after I pass my finals.

If you have taken this mind-set into your final semester, you are already behind. Many of your peers have been looking for, and may have locked up, internships or full-time positions for the coming months. Job seeking can be an extremely long-process especially when you have little experience. There are not many things in life that you wait until the last minute to start planning, especially something as important as a job search.  

Normally at Humana, we begin accepting internship applications and entry-level college programs roles in August of the year prior. But, each year we also get notes from students inquiring about positions the next spring and summer as well, when those positions have been long-filled. Make sure to start your search early.

2.  I want to work as a _____ for ____ company, living in ____, and making ____ .

This is one of our favorites. Sometimes students can get a very narrow focus (not always a bad thing), while other times the student can have no focus at all. The difference between the two would be someone who could fill in each blank of the above statement (narrow) and a person who does not know what they would like to be doing now, much less five years from now (broad). You have to find a balance between having too narrow a focus and too broad a focus. You want to have some idea of where you would like your career to go, but not so much that you limit your options too far.

Another piece of this is your expectations. Some students come in and want to get their foot in the door anyway they can. That’s great, and we love to see students like this. They want to work hard and get in the door because they know they can use their skills to stand-out and eventually move up once they have a solid foundation. On the other hand, we have students that come into interviews who have obviously over-valued themselves. It’s one thing to be confident in your abilities, but it is something completely different to come into an interview as a recent college graduate and look for a director-level role. This is not a hard and fast rule, but you should know what your true value is.

3.  I can do my entire job search online.

Untrue. In this digital age, it may seem as though this is the case, but remember, the name of the game in a job search is differentiation. How do you differentiate yourself by just using a word document you uploaded to a website (just like everyone else). There are so many opportunities to network person-to-person with employers. We at Humana are regularly on campuses across the country throughout the year, as well as other major nationwide events. Come see us, meet our people, and show us a face. This allows you times to articulate more than you can on a one-page resume and also can potentially give you a point of contact into the employer.

All that is not to say that you can’t connect with us online, or that you shouldn’t; far from it. We have a lot of resources online devoted to connecting with people just like you. Check out our Twitter account @Humana_Careers or our Facebook page Humana College Programs. If you have questions or comments for us, we love to hear them on our social pages.

Why Working at a Donut Shop Could Lead To Your Dream Job

(Written by Jessica Halcom, Corporate Recruiting Manager – Human Resources for Schneider National, Inc.)

Our cumulative life experiences create who we are, and who we will become. You’ve likely heard about Steve Jobs haven taken a calligraphy class almost “on a whim” after he’d dropped out of college. What he took away from that class would largely influence the design of Apple and Mac computers. At the outset, calligraphy doesn’t appear to have a thing to do with computer science, but it ultimately became one of the largest differentiating factors in consumer preference between Apple and their competition.

I often have students tell me that they’ve purposely left work experience off of their resume because it “wasn’t relevant” to the job to which they’d applied. You might not think you’re headed for the Forbes List because of the summer job you took working on a line in a factory, but I’d argue that you may be wrong, and I’d like to pass along some advice:

Potential employers care about all of your work experience, not just the seemingly related.  All job experience is valuable experience. Madonna worked at Dunkin Donuts in New York when she was still trying to launch her career, Bryan Cranston worked on a paper route, and Sara Blakely sold fax machines door-to-door. Admittedly, fried dough, newspapers and faxes have little to do with singing, acting and Spanx, however, proving a good work ethic, personal responsibility and showing up every day on time, and willing to learn, say a lot about you.

If you had a job that doesn’t seem to match up with the skill set for the position you’re applying to, prospective employers still want to hear about it. Consider this example; the Director of Operations is deciding whether or not to hire you based upon the three month internship you had last spring in a production department of another company, because that was the only job you listed on your resume, deeming it the only relevant experience you have. You excluded the three summers you spent painting houses, and the job you have as a shift leader during the school year at a local sub shop. By omitting work history, you weren’t showcasing your work ethic, willingness to work long hours, ability to make quick decisions, experience working with customers in a fast paced environment, team work and leadership qualities, all of which are skills that would benefit most any organization, and would make you a more attractive candidate for the role.

It’s important to account for your time, no matter what. A candidate who hasn’t worked during their summer breaks may have an excellent work ethic, problem solving skills and be incredibly creative, but how would we know? If you haven’t taken a job during the school year, or on summer breaks, tell us about what kept you busy. We want to know about your volunteer work, sports teams or organizations you were involved with, or study abroad experiences. You don’t necessarily need to be earning a paycheck to be gaining some valuable skills. Another thing I’d urge you to consider is that when purposely omitting work history from a resume, leaving an unexplained gap in time can make it appear as though you have something to hide. The best rule of thumb is to always be honest.

For summer, part-time, internship and full-time positions check out the opportunities at www.uwgb.edu/careers today!

10 Skills Job Seekers Need

Courtesy of the National Association of Colleges and Employers.

10 Skills Job Seekers Need

When it comes to a job seeker’s skills/qualities, employers are looking for team players who can solve problems, organize their work, and communicate effectively, according to employers who responded to NACE’s Job Outlook 2014 survey.

Employers who interview and hire new college graduates were asked to rank a job candidate’s desired skills and qualities. Employers rated seven of 10 qualities as “very important”; three were rated “somewhat important.” (See Figure 1.)

How can you demonstrate that you have these qualities? Here are some things you can do during your college years to meet these demands:

Join extracurricular activities. Being an active member of a club or an intramural sports team, organizing a volunteer project, or taking part in group tasks, will help you earn that top quality spot, “ability to work in a team structure.” Participating in extracurricular activities while maintaining a high GPA will demonstrate that you have the “ability to plan, organize, and prioritize work.”

Keep Your GPA High. Good grades show that you have a good knowledge base—the “technical knowledge related to the job”—and demonstrates a strong work ethic—a quality that employers value.

Find an internship. Another way to demonstrate your knowledge of the job is to have done an internship or two in your field. You’ll have taken an opportunity to look at your future career close up while getting hands-on experience with any potential job. Your internship can put your “foot in the door” to a job opportunity with many employers and help you build a network of professionals in your field.

Make a Date With the Career Center. The career center staff can help you go a long way in preparation for selling yourself to future employers. In addition to helping you choose a major and career direction, a career counselor can help you find internships, perfect your cover letter and resume, and develop your interviewing skills. Good interview skills will help you show a potential employer know that you can “verbally communicate” with people inside and outside the organization.

 

Ace That Interview!

It’s natural to be nervous before a job interview.  But did you know there are some simple tricks you can use to calm your nerves?  In an article on Forbes.com, a group of renowned career experts give excellent advice on how to calm your nerves before and during an important job interview.  Follow these simple tips and you’re sure to do great!

 1.  Be Prepared.

  • Do research: on the company, their products, their competition, on the position you’re applying for, anything!  The more you know the more confident you’ll sound.

2.  Plan.

  • Work out little details beforehand, instead of the morning of.  Print your resume, iron you pants and shirt, map out your route and check traffic reports.  Don’t let unexpected delays catch you off guard.

3.  Rehearse.

  • You don’t need to memorize a script, but preparing what you would like to say can be a big help.  Remember, practice makes perfect!

4.  Eliminate the Unknown.

  • If you’re not sure about the company’s dress code, call their HR department and ask.  The fear of the unknown can make you unnecessarily nervous so sort out any uncertainties before your interview.

5.  Arrive Early and Relax.

  • Allow yourself plenty of time.  Before going inside, take a few minutes to sit in your car and gather your thoughts. 

6.  Think of the Interview as a Conversation.

  • If you think of the interview more like a conversation between two people it is easier to stay calm.  Both of you are trying to get to know each other and access whether you would be a good fit for each other. 

7.  Think Positive and Be Confident.

  • Don’t let negative thoughts of doing poorly wreck your interview before you even start.  Visualize yourself doing a great job, and it’s more likely to come true!

8.  Think Friend, Not Foe.

  • Remember that the interviewer is not your enemy.  They simply want to know if you will be a good fit for their company.  Taking the time to learn a little bit about the person who will be interviewing you will help you to visualize them as just a regular person.

9.  Sit Up Straight and Don’t Fidget.

  • It’s no secret that you appear more confident when you are sitting up straight, but it also helps project your voice and make you sound better, too! 

10.  Normalize.

  • Realizing that it’s normal to be nervous is a big step in helping to calm your nerves.  Don’t sweat it!

11.  Focus on Your Strengths and Your Purpose.

  • Try this: Imagine you already got the job.  Why is that?  By thinking about all of your strong points you can focus on portraying yourself the way you want the interviewer to see you instead of worrying about inadequacies. 

12.  Breathe and Take Your Time.

  • Deep breathing increases the oxygen going to your brain and helps calm your nerves.  If you need time to gather your thoughts before answering a question, take a deep breath, even jot down a few notes.  It will help to keep you on track.

13.  Accept the Fact that Mistakes Will Happen.

  • We all know nobody is perfect.  And truthfully employers aren’t looking for perfection either.  If you remember this it will be easier to take the pressure of and focus on doing your best.

14.  Remember There Are Other Jobs Out There.

  • It’s easy to get caught up thinking that if this interview doesn’t go well you’re doomed to unemployment forever.  But don’t put all your eggs in one basket!  There will be other jobs!

               To read the full article and get more information go to http://www.forbes.com/pictures/efkk45ehgee/how-to-stay-calm-during-a-job-interview/ 

Make sure you check out the Career Services webpage for more interview tips.  You can also attend Interviewing Basics-Make a Good Impression on April 17th.  There we can provide you with even more information about how to effectively answer questions and ace your interview!

Does College Prepare You for the Job Market?

Everyone knows that a Bachelor’s degree has pretty much become a prerequisite in the job market.  But did you know that employers are starting to feel like recent graduates are unprepared when it comes to hiring?  According to an article by Karin Fischer published in The Chronicle of Higher Education, employers find candidates with bachelor’s degrees to be under-qualified and ill-prepared.  Many of these employers are blaming colleges for the lack of preparedness, with over 30% ranking them as “fair or poor.”  But why is this?  What are we doing wrong?  And what can we do to fix it?

Fischer states that the breakdown between the goals college degree and the expectations of employers differ in regards to marketability.  She believes that colleges seek to prepare graduates on a broad scale, giving them a wide variety of knowledge and skills, whereas employers want candidates with specialized skills and specific knowledge.  Employers want a college grad to be trained and ready to begin working from day one. 

According to the survey in the article, as well as a survey of employers in the 2013 NACE Job Outlook, the most important (and lacking) skill for recent college grads is the ability to effectively communicate verbally.  Employers are looking for candidates that can speak their mind and give intelligent responses to questions and problems.  These skills are often overlooked, but can be very important in a job setting, as you will most likely be working with a group of people from time to time.  David E. Boyes is quoted in the Chronicle article as having said, “It’s not a matter of technical skill, but of knowing how to think.”  Developing critical thinking skills will allow you to make decisions and express yourself in an effective way. 

Here at UW-Green Bay we offer a wide range of critical thinking course as part of our interdisciplinary approach to education.  Consider taking Fundamentals of Interpersonal Communication (Comm-166) and Communication Problems (Comm-200) to develop and hone these marketable skills.  There are also numerous leadership opportunities in student organizations, including Student Government Association, Sigma Tau Delta, and other major related clubs.  Search the UWGB webpage for a list of all orgs offered on campus.  If you want to further develop on-the-job skills, try an internship.  The Career Services office can assist you in searching and applying for internships.  Check out the PRO website to browse local internship options.

The jobs market it always changing; there’s not changing that.  But how we adapt to it is entirely up to us.  Knowing which skills and assets are important to employers can help you better develop skills to meet these growing demands.  Stop by Career Services (SS 1600) to find out more about what you can do to prepare yourself for the jobs market and beyond.