What I Did During My Summer Vacation

Grades have been submitted, Memorial Day has come and gone… it’s true, summer is officially here. Perhaps you’re still in recovery mode. Maybe you’re just starting to think about what you’ll do over the next few months. Many students may not realize “How Summer Can Change Your Future.” 

In The Wall Street Journal article written by Brett Arends, he addresses research that was conducted by Economic professors from the University of Wisconsin-La Crosse, the University of Pennsylvania and Auburn University.  I encourage you to read the article, as it gives a glimpse of what employers consider when reviewing candidates. To sum it up, what gave fictitious candidates the edge?  Their academic major?  Their GPA?  Nope. It was their summer internship. Noted in the article – “Candidates whose resumes could point to pregraduation work experience in the industry they were applying for were 14% more likely to get an interview. An English major with a middling GPA and a summer internship in a bank was more likely to get a job interview at a bank than an outstanding finance major who spent the summer touring Europe.” 

If you haven’t quite planned out your summer, it doesn’t mean you should throw in the towel. While many employers may have already hired their summer interns, there may be circumstances that have created last-minute openings – or – an employer may be seeking a part-time or summer/seasonal employee that would allow a student to gain experience in an industry or position of interest. Use the various resources available to you through Career Services. Log into your Phoenix Recruitment On-Line (PRO) account to search for positions. Career Services is open throughout the summer; you can call to make an appointment to have a staff member review your resume and/or cover letter or discuss your internship/job search strategy or go through a practice interview. Our website with links to various resources and information is available 24/7. Even if you aren’t able to secure an internship for summer, you may find opportunities for the fall.

Taking action today can help you later as you prepare to enter the competitive job search process.

Advice from the Alumni

Written by Tina Norman, Human Resources Manager at GENCO

Congratulations on your impending graduation! As you think about your college career coming to an end and beginning the next chapter of your life with a “real job”, who better to get some advice from than UWGB Alumni?

As a large employer in Green Bay, I had the opportunity to sit down with nine of our UWGB Alumni to get their thoughts on some common questions college students may have as they enter the next chapter.

When should a college student begin looking for full-time employment?
Don’t wait too long! At a minimum, begin researching the companies that interest you during the summer before your graduating year. As the fall semester arrives, begin to narrow your search. By the end of that semester, we recommend sending your resume to prospective employers or networking through alumni connections that you found in your search the prior summer.

How do I begin a career search?
Begin your search with companies that are natural fits to your field of study. Pay attention to the location and job market within that geographical area. We cannot stress enough the importance of networking and LinkedIn makes it easier than ever. If you know someone who works/interns at the company you have interest in, ask for their feedback. If you have an opportunity yourself to intern there, take advantage of this as early as you can within your college career.

What can I do to learn about a company’s culture to ensure it’s where I want to work?
There are many ways to learn about a company’s culture to include researching them on the internet, Facebook, and LinkedIn. We recommend applying to multiple companies. Time is of the essence as graduation, believe it or not, it will come very quickly! If you get multiple interviews, great! Not only will this give you good practice and help you gain confidence in your interviewing skills, you may also have options to choose from in the end. Remember to also use your career resources at UWGB – they do a wonderful job at helping you be prepared.

As interviewers yourselves, what do you look for in a candidate during the interview?
First of all, the first impression is critical. Many interviewers will form an initial impression within the first few minutes of meeting you. It’s important to have a clean, professional personal appearance, eye contact, and a firm handshake to show confidence. When asked to “tell me about yourself”, be sure to have your thoughts organized. More importantly, remember to be specific, but brief. As you proceed with the interview, use specific examples to help the interviewer get to know you. At the end, be prepared with questions for the interviewers…you are interviewing the company as much as they are interviewing you. For example, consider asking your interviewer about their experiences at the company – what do they like best? What does a typical day look like? What keeps them up at night? It’s always good to ask about key factor metrics for the role and seek to understand the company’s three-year strategy.

We’d be remiss if we didn’t comment on the resume. A resume should be well written with no spelling or grammar errors. As you highlight your education and work experience, be sure to keep in mind the job description of the position you are applying for. Highlight your experiences that compliment the skills your potential employer is looking for. For example, if you were interested in a position at GENCO, we are looking for people who are motivated, a self-starter, and able to balance multiple tasks. Don’t be afraid to list student groups and activities that you’ve participated in on your resume to “beef up” your work history.

When given a job offer, what should I consider as I make my decision to accept, counter, or decline?
Many people look at the salary, but there is so much more to a job offer. Our advice is to consider the entire compensation package which includes base salary, benefits, bonuses, culture, work/life balance, training, and career opportunities.

What final advice do you have for graduating students?
As you begin your job search, be open-minded. Take some time to reflect upon what is important to you. Rank the top 5 things that are most important to you such as location, commute, culture, pay, benefits, etc. As you begin your career, you will notice that you will spend a lot of time at work. It’s important to take the time up front to do your research to find the right company for you.

Good luck!

Are you showing up for the right interview?

Written by Abby Despins, Corporate Communication Manager at Schreiber Foods.

The day is finally here. You’ve spent months perfecting your resume, creating cover letters and following up with potential employers. And now you’ve gotten the most coveted call among all job seekers … the recruiter asking for an interview. Most students will jump for joy and then wait patiently until the day of the interview. This is one of the biggest mistakes you can make in your job search. The hard work really starts now: preparing for the interview.

Before you hang up the phone with the recruiter, make sure you know what interview style the company uses. Some recruiters will offer up this information, others will not. Either way, don’t hang up without knowing what interview you’re showing up for.

Why? What many students don’t know is that there are several types of interviews. The company’s interview style will drastically change how you prepare. The most common include:

Structured and Patterned Interviews
Also called a repetitive interview, in structured interviews, potential employers ask every applicant the same questions to ensure that similar data is collected from all candidates.

Similarly, in patterned interviews, also called targeted interviews, interviewers ask each applicant questions that are targeting the same knowledge, skill or ability. Unlike structured interviews, questions can vary from applicant to applicant.

If you’re headed into a structured or patterned interview, ask the recruiter for some sample interview questions they may ask, or research potential questions online.

Behavioral Interviews
Behavioral interviews focus on identifying a specific situation and evaluating how the interviewee handled it. The theory here is that an interviewee’s past behavior will predict future behavior if they were to work for their company. Potential employers find these interviews valuable because they get to see the candidate thinking, solving and acting. They’ll ask you to tell them about situations you’ve handled in the past, such as:
• Give an example of how you set goals and achieve them.
• Give an example of how you worked on a team.
• Describe how you’ve handled a difficult situation.

In this method, you should use a STAR method to answer behavioral-based questions.
• S/T= Situation/Task: Paint a high level picture of what the situation looked like and then describe the context or background of the situation or task.
• A= Action: Describe what you did or did not do in that situation and how was it done. The majority of your answer should focus on your actions.
• R= Results: Describe what the end result of that situation was.

To prepare for behavioral interviews, think about some examples before the interview. How did you handle the situation? Who was involved? What was the outcome? Be prepared enough to give specific details about your experiences that demonstrate your knowledge, approach and personality.

Situational Interviews
Similar to behavioral interviews, this method tries to predict future behavior. The Interviewer will ask questions to elicit stories and examples that demonstrate skill and qualification levels. What differentiates situational interviews from behavioral interviews is that in situational interviews the interviewer will ask hypothetical questions (i.e. how would you handle this situation), such as:
• You have a deadline approaching and fear you will be unable to meet it. What do you do?
• A co-worker frequently leaves early when the boss is not around, and asks you to cover for him. What would you do?
• How would you handle it if you believed strongly in a recommendation you made in a meeting, but most of your co-workers shot it down?

In the interview, take the opportunity to weave in past experiences as you answer situational questions.

At Schreiber, we use a combination of behavioral-based and structured interviews. This means that we ask all candidates the same questions and look for previous examples on how they handled a situation. We’ve seen great success with this interview style and we can tell who’s prepared to give us examples of successes and challenges they’ve encountered throughout their careers – whether they have 20 years of experience, or classroom experience.

For more information about interviews, I encourage you to visit the UW-Green Bay Career Services’ resources page on interviewing. And as you’re planning to land your next interview, take a look at the careers we offer at Schreiber and get a peek into the Schreiber culture by connecting with us on Facebook and LinkedIn.

Common Career Pitfalls to Avoid

Written by Robert Brookman, Talent Acquisition Department with Humana

Within our robust college recruiting program, we see a lot of mistakes and pitfalls that college students regularly fall into during their career search. These are things that may seem like common sense, but over the course of time become less of a priority. The strategy any student should take into a job search is to make sure first and foremost; they do not disqualify themselves because of a minor mistake. Often times in recruiting, the first cut of candidates is made because of minor mistakes such as grammar, spelling, formatting, etc. We want to put you as a job seeker, in the best place to succeed in your impending search. That’s why we have compiled the following list of common pitfalls to steer clear of.

1.  I can begin looking for a job after I pass my finals.

If you have taken this mind-set into your final semester, you are already behind. Many of your peers have been looking for, and may have locked up, internships or full-time positions for the coming months. Job seeking can be an extremely long-process especially when you have little experience. There are not many things in life that you wait until the last minute to start planning, especially something as important as a job search.  

Normally at Humana, we begin accepting internship applications and entry-level college programs roles in August of the year prior. But, each year we also get notes from students inquiring about positions the next spring and summer as well, when those positions have been long-filled. Make sure to start your search early.

2.  I want to work as a _____ for ____ company, living in ____, and making ____ .

This is one of our favorites. Sometimes students can get a very narrow focus (not always a bad thing), while other times the student can have no focus at all. The difference between the two would be someone who could fill in each blank of the above statement (narrow) and a person who does not know what they would like to be doing now, much less five years from now (broad). You have to find a balance between having too narrow a focus and too broad a focus. You want to have some idea of where you would like your career to go, but not so much that you limit your options too far.

Another piece of this is your expectations. Some students come in and want to get their foot in the door anyway they can. That’s great, and we love to see students like this. They want to work hard and get in the door because they know they can use their skills to stand-out and eventually move up once they have a solid foundation. On the other hand, we have students that come into interviews who have obviously over-valued themselves. It’s one thing to be confident in your abilities, but it is something completely different to come into an interview as a recent college graduate and look for a director-level role. This is not a hard and fast rule, but you should know what your true value is.

3.  I can do my entire job search online.

Untrue. In this digital age, it may seem as though this is the case, but remember, the name of the game in a job search is differentiation. How do you differentiate yourself by just using a word document you uploaded to a website (just like everyone else). There are so many opportunities to network person-to-person with employers. We at Humana are regularly on campuses across the country throughout the year, as well as other major nationwide events. Come see us, meet our people, and show us a face. This allows you times to articulate more than you can on a one-page resume and also can potentially give you a point of contact into the employer.

All that is not to say that you can’t connect with us online, or that you shouldn’t; far from it. We have a lot of resources online devoted to connecting with people just like you. Check out our Twitter account @Humana_Careers or our Facebook page Humana College Programs. If you have questions or comments for us, we love to hear them on our social pages.

Forget What You “Know”

(Written by Tonia Gibeault, Director – Human Resources for ACUITY, A Mutual Insurance Company)

Life is about choices. For example, one can choose to “know,” or one can choose to know. While attending college in pursuit of a degree in business management, I knew I would eventually establish a career in a business or corporate setting. I also “knew” I would never work for an insurance company, nor in the sales or marketing fields. Ironically, however, my first “real job” out of college was as a marketing analyst for my current employer—an industry-leading and award-winning insurance company—over 13 years ago.

I have spent the last decade of my career in ACUITY’s human resources department. During this time, I have had the pleasure of interacting with a myriad of students, many who “know” and a few who know. For the few who know, this attribute is a distinct competitive advantage when talking to employers about job opportunities. So, how do you gain this advantage?

#1 – Forget what you “know” by keeping an open mind. If you’re a math major, do you “know” you must become a math teacher or work with numbers all day, or do you know that some of ACUITY’s brightest and most talented software developers earned their degrees in mathematics? If you’re an accounting or finance major, do you know you have transferrable skills conducive to a successful career in underwriting? If you’re a history major, do you know you can come very close to rewriting history for many victims as a claims adjuster, positively impacting their lives forever?

I estimate that 95%—likely more—of the employees hired at ACUITY never envisioned working in the insurance industry, simply because they didn’t know about the variety of dynamic and rewarding opportunities. Keep an open mind and know there are incredible opportunities outside the commonly known career paths in your field of study.

#2 – Forget what you “know” by doing your research. Many students have their hearts set on one position with one or two companies because they “know” these as their only options. When an acquaintance informed me about the marketing analyst position, I immediately dismissed the opportunity because I “knew” I didn’t want to be employed in sales or marketing (nor did I want to work for an insurance company, as you may recall). Thankfully, enough information was shared with me to spark an interest. At this juncture, I transitioned from “knowing” I would never work in the insurance industry to knowing it was a possibility. Extensive research on ACUITY and speaking with someone already in the position solidified my interest. I knew this was a great opportunity to leave my job and begin a career.

Your Career Services team hosts several events throughout the year—including widely-attended career fairs—to broaden the informational and job opportunities available to you. Use these convenient events to educate yourself. Research positions and companies. Know which are best for you.

The return on investment from keeping an open mind and conducting research is substantial. Forget what you “know,” and learn what you need to know.

To learn about ACUITY’s entry-level job opportunities, visit https://www.acuity.com/acuityweb/careers/mainpage.xhtml

Welcome Back, Students!

It’s our first day of the 2014 Spring semester. Although it’s difficult to think of “Spring” when we’re currently in a deep freeze, Career Services wants to light a fire to help you get excited about the coming semester. We have a great line up of programs to help you - whether you’re starting to consider applying for an internship, or are preparing for your last semester and finalizing your post-graduate plans. Here is a sampling of what’s to come over the next few months:

LinkedIn – The Basics to Get Started
Wed., Feb. 19  |  11:45 a.m. – 12:45 p.m.  |  1965 Room, Union
Learn about this social media networking tool and how it can help you professionally begin your career.  Topics include LinkedIn groups, endorsements, recommendations and how to connect with alumni.

Prep for Success – Employer Panel
Mon., Feb. 24  |  12:45 p.m. – 2 p.m.  |  Phoenix Room B, Union
A panel of employers will be available to answer questions about interviewing, job fair etiquette, the job search, and more. Take this opportunity to prepare yourself for the Job and Internship Fair, Mock Interview Day and Dine Like a Professional Etiquette Lunch.

Basics of Behavioral Interviewing
Tues., Feb. 25  |  12:30 p.m. – 2:00 p.m.  |  Phoenix Room B, Union
“Tell me about a time when you…” Behavior based interview questions are common within the job search process. Join our guest speaker, Stacy Butter from Schneider National as she takes our audience through ways to effectively manage behavior based interviews.

Mock Interview Day
Thurs., Feb. 27 from 8 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.  | Phoenix Rooms, Union
Nervous about interviewing?  A variety of professionals will conduct practice interviews with our students. During the session, the interviewer will ask typical interview questions for approximately 20 minutes, and provide you with feedback about your performance. Develop your interview skills in a no-risk setting.  Sign up required with a deadline of Thursday, February 20.

Dine Like a Professional Lunch
Mon., March 3 from 11:40 a.m. – 1:40 p.m.  |  Weidner Center
This is an opportunity for students to mingle with UW-Green Bay alumni and community members to develop new skills in a fun learning environment. Lyn Hulgan, owner and etiquette consultant at Essential Details, will take students through the basics of professional dining etiquette during a delicious meal. Registration is required, with a deadline of Friday, February 21. Space is limited, so register early!

Spring Job & Internship Fair
Wed., March 5 from 9:30 a.m. – 1:00 p.m.  |  Phoenix Rooms, Union
Visit face-to-face with employers who are seeking candidates for full-time, internship and part-time positions. Dress professionally and bring your resume!  View the complete list of registered employers in PRO.

 

In addition to these events, we will be hosting our Creating a Resume 101Interviewing Basics and Applying to Graduate School workshops, as well as offering opportunities for students to have a professional photo taken for their LinkedIn profile.

For details about all of these events, registration instructions and more, check out our calendar of events by logging into PRO, or view our website at http://www.uwgb.edu/careers/skills/calendar.asp

Why Working at a Donut Shop Could Lead To Your Dream Job

(Written by Jessica Halcom, Corporate Recruiting Manager – Human Resources for Schneider National, Inc.)

Our cumulative life experiences create who we are, and who we will become. You’ve likely heard about Steve Jobs haven taken a calligraphy class almost “on a whim” after he’d dropped out of college. What he took away from that class would largely influence the design of Apple and Mac computers. At the outset, calligraphy doesn’t appear to have a thing to do with computer science, but it ultimately became one of the largest differentiating factors in consumer preference between Apple and their competition.

I often have students tell me that they’ve purposely left work experience off of their resume because it “wasn’t relevant” to the job to which they’d applied. You might not think you’re headed for the Forbes List because of the summer job you took working on a line in a factory, but I’d argue that you may be wrong, and I’d like to pass along some advice:

Potential employers care about all of your work experience, not just the seemingly related.  All job experience is valuable experience. Madonna worked at Dunkin Donuts in New York when she was still trying to launch her career, Bryan Cranston worked on a paper route, and Sara Blakely sold fax machines door-to-door. Admittedly, fried dough, newspapers and faxes have little to do with singing, acting and Spanx, however, proving a good work ethic, personal responsibility and showing up every day on time, and willing to learn, say a lot about you.

If you had a job that doesn’t seem to match up with the skill set for the position you’re applying to, prospective employers still want to hear about it. Consider this example; the Director of Operations is deciding whether or not to hire you based upon the three month internship you had last spring in a production department of another company, because that was the only job you listed on your resume, deeming it the only relevant experience you have. You excluded the three summers you spent painting houses, and the job you have as a shift leader during the school year at a local sub shop. By omitting work history, you weren’t showcasing your work ethic, willingness to work long hours, ability to make quick decisions, experience working with customers in a fast paced environment, team work and leadership qualities, all of which are skills that would benefit most any organization, and would make you a more attractive candidate for the role.

It’s important to account for your time, no matter what. A candidate who hasn’t worked during their summer breaks may have an excellent work ethic, problem solving skills and be incredibly creative, but how would we know? If you haven’t taken a job during the school year, or on summer breaks, tell us about what kept you busy. We want to know about your volunteer work, sports teams or organizations you were involved with, or study abroad experiences. You don’t necessarily need to be earning a paycheck to be gaining some valuable skills. Another thing I’d urge you to consider is that when purposely omitting work history from a resume, leaving an unexplained gap in time can make it appear as though you have something to hide. The best rule of thumb is to always be honest.

For summer, part-time, internship and full-time positions check out the opportunities at www.uwgb.edu/careers today!

Be Prepared for Your Career After Graduation – It’s Worth the Energy

(Thank you to our Valued Partner, Integrys – for authoring this month’s blog)

Transitioning from the college scene to the professional job market may not be as far off in the distant future as you might think, and it has the potential to cause quite a few pitfalls for the unprepared student – both for the short-term and the long-term. One common example experienced by far too many college graduates is that they don’t necessarily possess a high level of hands-on experience in their field of study – resulting in a fragile resume that doesn’t help much in landing a job offer. Conundrums like this one stem from the well known circular-reasoning of “You can’t get a job without experience, and you can’t get experience without a job”. So which one comes first – the job or the experience?

One answer to this question comes to many students in the form of an internship or an apprenticeship. Regardless of your field of study, there are many job opportunities available to students who are still enrolled in college-level education, and can be accessed through a host of websites and job and internship fairs. Using your UW Campus ID number, you can access the Phoenix Recruitment On-Line (PRO) resource, which serves as a connection between employers and students. Other resources include Green Bay Current from the Green Bay Chamber of Commerce, LinkedIn, and the numerous Job fairs that are hosted in the Phoenix rooms on UW-Green Bay campus.

Finding the channel that suits you the best, and using it tap into the vast pool of opportunities in the greater Green Bay area, and to get in contact with employers who are actively looking for interns is a great first step towards building up your resume and obtaining real-life experience in your area of study – which is exactly what employers look for when you’re searching for a position to begin your career after graduation. Never think that it’s too early to begin bolstering your greatest investment (your education) with an applicable internship. The more experience that you have under your belt at the time of your graduation will serve to rocket you into your career. Don’t get caught in the doldrums after you graduate – begin your quest for an internship today!

The Lost Art of Thank You During the Job Search

A frequent comment today from employers focuses around the simple “thank you” from job seekers during the search process and especially following an interview.  Unfortunately it appears that the job seekers who actually send a thank you letter following a job interview are in the minority.  Many years ago, you set yourself apart from the candidate pool when you failed to send a thank you letter.  Today – you are singled out in a positive way when a candidate sends a follow-up thank you letter in the job search.  This is a basic, simple action and often seen as common courtesy – sending a letter or note of thanks to the employer for evaluating your candidacy and allowing you to interview and meet their employees.  It is best to send a targeted thank you letter which focuses on the job and opportunity.  In the letter it is ideal as a candidate to reference a discussion or part of the interview.  This demonstrates your interest and level of connection during the experience. In the thank you letter, take the time to emphasize and point out your skill set and qualifications.  Finally be sure to reiterate your interest in the opportunity.  This thank you letter can be sent by email – which is the more commonly acceptable format today.  However it can be sent via US mail.  Our staff recommends candidates send a professional letter and avoid the personal, handwritten thank you note.  See this article for additional information about the importance of thank you letters here:  http://www.careerrush.com/careerrushblog/1113/why-a-thank-you-letter-after-interview-is-so-important/

A new twist on the “thank you” letter concept is for candidates to send a thank you for a “No” received during a job search.  Once again, this simple act can keep communication going and allow for a long term connection with the organization.  You never know when another opportunity with the organization might open again.  Sometimes candidates hired do not work out for the employer.  A recent online article details why saying thank you for a “No” can be a big benefit to a candidate during the job search.  See the details here:  http://designresumes.com/2013/01/why-to-say-thank-you-for-the-no-when-you-dont-get-the-job/?goback=%2Egde_44583_member_205138013

Staff in Career Services can help you in developing a solid, effective thank you letter.  The most important thing to remember in the job or internship search is to send a thank you letter following an interview.  Take every opportunity you can to keep your candidacy at the forefront for the employer.  Examples and more information are available on our website:  http://www.uwgb.edu/careers/skills/professional-letters-guide.asp#post.

Welcome Back! Are YOU ready for Fall?

Throughout the summer, Career Services has been busy preparing for the upcoming fall semester. As summer break winds down, an increasing number of employers have been in touch with us as they look for part-time, full-time and internship candidates. If you’re seeking a position, you certainly don’t want to miss out on these opportunities! Here are a few things you can do now to prepare for the fall recruiting season:

Got a plan? First things first. Before you start your job or internship search, do you know where you’re headed? Perhaps you recently declared your major and have ideas about possible careers, but haven’t really explored your options. By having a goal or general direction in mind, it will help you develop a more effective resume and target your job or internship search. Visit with a staff member in Career Services if you need help narrowing down your options or developing a plan.

Develop or update your resume. If you created a resume last year, review it carefully. Does the same information apply? Does your objective accurately reflect your search? Have you added your summer employment or internship to your resume? It might be time to delete older information (such as high school involvement) and include relevant courses or projects you’ve completed. We have guides and resources on our website to help you develop or update your resume. Remember, our staff can review your resume to help you effectively market yourself to employers.

PRO – Phoenix Recruitment Online. Be sure to upload your resume into PRO. Not only is it required to participate in on-campus interviews, but it also allows employers to find you if they conduct a resume search in the system. You will also want to update your profile in PRO – check your contact information, major, anticipated graduation date. Set up a search agent – this tool in PRO will notify you be email when new openings are posted in the system. Instructions for uploading resumes, searching for jobs and setting up a search agent are located in the Resource Library in PRO. (TIP: Look at the tabs on the left side of the screen – click on “Resource Library” – and find the “PRO User Information” folder.)

Attire. This might sound simple (and it is), but do you have appropriate attire if you’d be invited for an interview… let’s say… tomorrow? Sometimes students are caught off-guard, receiving an interview offer sooner than they had anticipated. Avoid the last-minute scramble and make a great first impression. Check your wardrobe to see if you have at least one interview appropriate outfit. We have tips to “Dress for Success” on our website at http://www.uwgb.edu/careers/skills/dress-for-success.asp

Know (and utilize) your resources. Career Services has a comprehensive website and hosts various workshops and programs throughout the semester. We also coordinate visits for employers who hold information tables on campus, conduct interviews, and attend our job & internship fairs. And don’t forget – our staff members are a valuable resource, whether you’re exploring your options, developing your professional skills, or making connections with employers. You can view the our workshops and programs at http://www.uwgb.edu/careers/skills/calendar.asp and our a complete calendar of programs, employer visits, and campus interviews is available in the “Career Events” section of the PRO system.

On behalf of the staff in Career Services, best wishes for a great start to the Fall 2012 semester. Please connect with us as you have questions!