Fall Job and Internship Fair

It’s that time of year again! The Fall Job and Internship Fair is right around the corner on Wednesday October 2, 2013!  Career and job fairs provide candidates with an opportunity to meet employers from a variety of industries and receive first-hand information about the organization and available full-time, part-time and internship positions. These fairs allow employers the opportunity to view a large number of potential candidates and promote their organization, which aids in the pre-screening process and gaining familiarity with students at the fair. 

So, how do you ensure that you get noticed and land that perfect internship?  Here are a few simple things that will ensure success:

Update your resume:

A good resume is paramount to the job search. It is the first glance that an employer will get of your background and credentials, so you want it to be neat and tidy. You want to make sure you include your most recent employer and possibly take out any information that may be irrelevant. For help with your resume you can find helpful information on the Career Services website, or you can always schedule an appointment with a Career Services professional. They can guide you step by step; making sure everything is in order and giving you useful suggestions on how you can improve the professional appearance of your resume. Once you have your resume in tip-top shape, you should print off several copies to hand out to the employers you speak to at the Job Fair.

Dress for success:

It is important to remember that the Job Fair is just like a job interview: you want to make the best first impression possible. Here are a few of the basic tips on professional attire.

Men:

  • Wear nice dress pants that are clean and pressed with a buttoned up shirt and tie.
  • Choose a solid-color button down shirt that is wrinkle-proof.
  • If you can’t afford a suit, purchase a single-breasted, black, two-button blazer that will go with several of your dress pants.
  • Black leather laced shoes are another “must have” that can be worn with a variety of outfits.

Women:

  • If you don’t own a suit, you could wear a skirt (knee length or below) with a sweater set or nice blouse.
  • Avoid heels unless you need the height and are comfortable wearing (and walking!) in them. Remember – closed-toed shoes.
  • Ideally, blouses should not reveal any cleavage or undergarments (bra straps, etc.).

It is important for everyone to remember that as a general rule, jeans are a no! If you are having trouble figuring out what to wear, always err on the side of caution and go for being over-dressed. Also, be sparing with make-up, perfumes, and colognes. More information can be found on the UW-Green Bay Career Services’ website.

Research:

Once you have your resume finalized and your outfit picked out, the last thing you should do is do your homework!  Research the companies that will be at the Job and Internship Fair and get to know a little bit about the ones you would like to speak with.  It is a great way to make a good impression and you will be more relaxed knowing you will have something to talk about with the employers.  The company representatives will also be impressed that you took the time and effort; just another way to stand out in the crowd!  A full list of the employers attending can be found on the PRO website – and if you log into PRO, you can view all of the information submitted by the employers, including information about their organization and the types of positions which they are hiring.  

So, don’t forget to mark your calendars for October 2nd 2013. Get your resumes ready, get out your pants suits and sports coats, and brush up on your interview skills.  The Fall Job and Internship Fair is almost here!

Get LinkedIn To Your Future

If you are waiting until after graduation to start building up your LinkedIn profile, it’s time to reconsider.  37% of surveyed job recruiters identified social professional networks as one of the most important sources for hiring; they are also the fastest growing source of quality hires.  With its recent celebration of its tenth anniversary, LinkedIn has become the largest social media platform created specifically for professionals to connect on the web – but more than 40% of college students say they’ve never used LinkedIn.  “Employers are looking for recent graduates,” says Nicole Williams, LinkedIn’s Career Expert and the founder of WORKS by Nicole Williams, a lifestyle brand for young, career-driven women.  If you’re active on LinkedIn as a college student, “you may be able to be identified as a college student, and as a potential candidate without you even having to apply.”

But how do you actually build a great LinkedIn profile as a college student?  Mashable has you covered.

Post a profile photo.

Some college students are wary of including their profile pictures on LinkedIn for fear of looking too young.  But Williams explains a profile picture could actually work in your favor.  A photo provides a face for your digital personality and helps recruiters see you as a human, rather than a hyperlink.

Include coursework and extracurriculars.

Your LinkedIn profile should weave together the story of your professional development, so it’s good to be as detailed as possible.  Include information about relevant coursework, clubs and organizations in which you’ve participated at school.  If you’ve done any internships or gained work experience, be specific about what skills you developed, how many hours you worked or how many students you tutored. 

“Part of your differentiator as a college student is that you know technology and you know how to build a professional brand,” says Williams.  “Employers want to know that you can bring that to their company.”

Show off your schoolwork.

You can now visually illustrate your skills with rich media, such as pictures and videos.  If you have a presentation you’re especially proud of, or a design project you executed for an internship, include it on your profile to help recruiters visualize what type of talent you bring to the table.

Ask professors and advisers for recommendations.

One common misconception of LinkedIn recommendations is that they have to come from previous employers.  A recommendation from a university professor or academic adviser, especially one with experience in your desired field, speaks volumes to your ability to stand out from the crowd.  Aim to get recommendations from professors who know you personally, or who have a good sense of your work ethic, and can speak specifically to your accomplishments in the classroom.

Connect with industry leaders.

One of the most exciting aspects of social media is the access it gives you to influential people in your industry.

Don’t be intimidated by someone’s professional clout; reach out to people whose careers you admire, but be sure to personalize your request to connect.  Your request should include two elements, says Williams.  The first should contain a detail that connects you to the person.  Look at his or her LinkedIn profile and pull out a piece of information that will help you personalize your request.  Ideally, include something you both have in common, like a hometown or a favorite publication.  If you can’t find anything significant to mention, offer a compliment or a respectful comment about the person’s professional work instead.

Second, include a reason.  Why do you want to connect with this person?  Your reason should NOT be a request for a job.  Instead, engage him or her with a request for career advice, a personal question, or offer up a skill that could be of service.  Demonstrate that you have a passion for what you do and offer up your services free of charge.  If a position opens up with their company or a company they have close contact with, you will go from a ‘maybe’ into being hired for the position.

Look into different career paths.

LinkedIn lets today’s college students access information on career paths in a way no other generation could.  Now, you not only see where someone has gotten in their career, but how they got there.  More often than not, people are surprised to see how non-linear careers are today.  And who knows, looking at someone else’s career path may inspire you to take a chance you otherwise wouldn’t.

 

For more career advice, visit Nicole Williams’s website http://www.nicolewilliams.com/ or mashable.com