The NACE First-Destination Survey

The NACE First-Destination Survey

Highlights: What Happened to the College Class of 2014?

  • More than half of bachelor’s degree graduates were employed full time.
  • 16.4 percent were continuing their education.
  • Those earning degrees in career-oriented majors were most likely to be employed full time, while graduates in the liberal arts and sciences were most likely to aim for a place in graduate or professional school.
  • Approximately 14 percent were still seeking employment; nearly 4 percent were still seeking to continue their education.
  • Overall, the median starting salary was $45,478.

 

Results by academic discipline
View Here

Results by type of school
View Here

First-Ever National Survey of College Graduate Outcomes

NACE’s Class of 2014 First-Destination Survey is the first-ever national survey focused on outcomes of new college graduates. It represents the inaugural survey in what is an annual initiative to provide clear, concise, and consistent data on the outcomes associated with a college education on a national scale.

More than 200 colleges and universities nationwide, representing 274,000 graduates—including more than one-quarter of a million bachelor’s degree graduates—provided data for Class of 2014 associate and bachelor’s degree graduates. (Class of 2014 is defined as those graduating from July 1, 2013, through June 30, 2014.) Overall, data were reported for nearly 175,000 bachelor’s degree graduates, making this study the most comprehensive view of bachelor’s degree outcomes available. The study provides data for 31 broad disciplines and 190 majors.

Beginning with the Class of 2015, the survey will include outcomes data for advanced-degree graduates.

The Class of 2015 survey, which captures data for those graduating July 1, 2014, through June 30, 2015, is currently underway. Data will be collected through December 30, 2015, reported to NACE through March 2016, and published in spring 2016.

Building a Strong LinkedIn Profile

View these tips to help you build a professional LinkedIn profile to capture the attention of potential employers! Courtesy of the National Association of Colleges and Employers (www.naceweb.org)

  • Use keywords in your summary statement. Many employers search by keyword, so use keywords—technical terms and skills—from your field. Not sure what your best keywords are? Find profiles of people who hold the job you’d like to get and see which keywords they use.
  • Write short text. Describe your skills and abilities in short bursts of keyword-rich text. Use bullets to separate information.
  • List all your experience. LinkedIn, like other social media, helps you connect with former colleagues and networking contacts who may be able to help you find a job opportunity. It also gives an employer searching to fill a job a description of your expertise.
  • Ask for recommendations. Collect a recommendation or two from someone at each of the organizations where you’ve worked. Don’t forget to get recommendations for internships you’ve completed.
  • Refresh your news. Update your status about major projects you’ve completed, books you’re reading, and professional successes you’ve had, at least once a week. This lets your professional contacts know what you are doing and serves as a sign of activity for potential employers.

Researching Employers

(By Alicia Bervine, Anne Orange, and Jennifer Whetstone-Jackson. Courtesy of the National Association of Colleges and Employers.)

Researching employers is perhaps the single-most important activity you will undertake in your job search. The information you uncover can help you:

  • Discover organizations that are a good match for you,
  • Identify the organization’s goals and needs,
  • Tailor your resume and cover letter to highlight your skills and experiences that match the employer’s needs,
  • Know what questions to ask employers,
  • Demonstrate your interest in and enthusiasm for the organization,
  • Answer interview questions with confidence, and
  • Make an informed employment decision.

Unfortunately, many students overlook the importance of research when undertaking a job search or looking for an internship. In fact, it’s common for employers to complain that potential job candidates haven’t “done their homework,” and instead come into the interview with little or no knowledge about the organization. These candidates flounder, asking questions that could be easily answered by a cursory look at the company website or literature. Needless to say, they make a poor impression, because employers often assume lack of research means lack of interest.

Where should you begin?

Start by developing a list of organizations in which you might be interested—companies that have the types of jobs or do the type of work that interests you. These could be organizations that visit your campus for career fairs, information sessions, and interviews, or they might be companies you have identified on your own as potential employers. An added bonus: You may discover lesser-known organizations that might be a match for your skills and interests. (Having a problem with this step? Talk with a career counselor in your campus career center for direction.)

Research companies to obtain information in each of the following categories:

  • Organizational overview: age, size, financial outlook, growth, and structure
  • Trends/issues in the industry
  • Mission, philosophy, objectives
  • Public or private or foreign-owned
  • Location of plants, offices, stores, subsidiaries
  • Products and/or services
  • Names of key executives
  • Competitors
  • Sales, assets, earnings
  • Growth history and current growth activity
  • Current challenges
  • Major achievements and activity, issues, news
  • Career paths, training, benefits
  • Company culture

For specific industries or sectors, see:

  • ThomasNet.com, for brief information about manufacturers in 67,000 categories in the United States and Canada.
  • GuideStar.org, for brief information on more than 1.8 million U.S. nonprofit organizations.
  • Idealist.org, for information on 71,000+ nonprofit organizations worldwide.
  • USA.gov, for a list of federal agencies (click on “Find Government Agencies” on the home page).
  • USChamber.com, for a list of employer members (click on Chambers and then “Chamber Directory”).

Don’t forget the resources available in your campus career center: Check your career center for information about employers that recruit at your school. Finally, this list of resources is a starting point; never underestimate the power of a search engine. Simply “Google” the name of the organization you are interested in and see what information and news is returned!

Other Research Resources

Start with the organization’s website.
Well-constructed and comprehensive sites will have abundant information, and for the sites that are not as comprehensive, it is still important to learn what is there. This is what the organization deems most important for you to know.

Look at university libraries’ research databases.
These will have information not available elsewhere for free, including financials, industries, market news, trade data, and more. Choose the business databases for information for the public, private, and nonprofit sectors. Some of the most relevant databases are Hoovers.com, Dun & Bradstreet Million Dollar Directory, Thomson One, Business Source Premier, IBISWorld, and Mergent Online.

Check your public library.
Public libraries have online research tools available free with a library card. In the business category, you may find ReferenceUSA, with information for more than 20 million U.S. companies, including nonprofit organizations. Speak to a reference librarian for additional options to research organizations.

Look at social networking sites, including LinkedIn.
LinkedIn has become a leading source of inside information about organizations.

  • On LinkedIn, find companies of interest and once found, click on the “Follow” tab to receive updates posted by the company.
  • Join groups related to any career interest appealing to you.
  • Contribute to discussions and connect with other members.
  • Use the advanced search to find alumni working in companies in which you are interested.

Try the Employer Locator on Careeronestop.
Go to www.acinet.org; in the site search window, search for “Employer Locator.” This is a U.S. government database of nearly 12 million U.S. employers with brief information about each. It’s a good resource for finding employers in a specific industry in a particular geographical location.

Look for small, independent companies in the local newspaper.

NOTE FROM UW-GREEN BAY CAREER SERVICES: Here is a link to a list of employers who will be attending UW-Green Bay’s Job & Internship Fair on Wednesday, March 4.  2015-SJIF-Vault-Profiles (Will open as a PDF)

Alicia Bervine is Program Manager, College of Arts & Sciences; Anne Orange is Career Librarian; and Jennifer Whetstone-Jackson is Program Manager, College of Engineering & Computing, at the University of South Carolina, Columbia.

Courtesy of the National Association of Colleges and Employers.

Job Market for Class of 2015 Looks Bright

Courtesy of the National Association of Colleges and Employers.

Employers expect to hire 8.3 percent more new college graduates from the Class of 2015 for their U.S. operations than they did from the Class of 2014.

As the economy has improved, many organizations have increased the number of new college graduates they bring on board.

Employers expressed the most interest in new college graduates at the bachelor’s degree level in the business, engineering, and computer/information sciences field. Among individual majors, finance, accounting, and computer science graduates are most sought-after by survey respondents. (Editor’s note: In general, demand for specific types of graduates is driven by the nature of responding employers. Not all industries are represented.)

Employers also expect to “sweeten the pot” some for their new hires. Overall, respondents said they plan to raise starting salaries to new college hires by 3.6 percent.

What Is a “Good Fit” and Do You Have It?

Courtesy of the National Association of Colleges and Employers.

by Dawn Shaw

How do you know if you’re a good fit for a company or if a company is a good fit for you? Here are a couple of things to consider:

  • Culture: Think back to all the encounters you have had with a potential employer. Think about the e-mail correspondence. Think about how you felt at the interview—not how you did, not how your performance was evaluated. Also, think about how everyone else was acting during the event. Did you like the recruiters’ responses? Did you feel uncomfortable? If you judged them on their performance, what grade would they get? Also, keep in mind that office visits can give you further information if the company is a good fit or not—go to office visits to help you decide.
  • Priorities: Part of finding the right fit is knowing your own priorities. Create a priority list before the recruiting process even begins. Write down what matters to you: Flexible schedule? Location? Team culture? Open to ideas? Future career opportunities? Rank them. Match the ranking against what you think the job can offer you. Also, be mindful of what you are doing now that affects your future career transitions.
  • Take an Inventory: A right attitude can be the first step in being part of the good fit. Do you have a habit of talking about what irks you to anyone that will listen? If so, this could easily disrupt a team dynamic and distract from the work you do. Consider what you can give before you judge what you get.
  • Ask Real Questions: You have an opportunity during interviews and office visits to get as much information as you can before having to make a decision. Do you care about the management style of your direct supervisor? Do you want to know how work is evaluated in the company? Ask! Many times your authentic questions show your sincerity and real commitment to the potential employer. And guess what? That is what makes you a good fit!

Dawn Shaw is a career consultant in MPA Career Services at the McCombs School of Business, The University of Texas at Austin.

 

Vault’s Top Internships for 2015!

Written by Frank Siano from Vault.com

Did you know that 40 percent of all full-time hires in the U.S. are sourced through internship programs? This means that, for those looking to work for the most desired and admired employers in the country, internships are no longer a luxury but a necessity. That is why the Career Services at the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay is providing all students with free access to these trusted rankings!

Vault administered its Internship Experience Survey earlier this year to approximately 5,800 interns at 100 different internship programs. As part of the survey, on a scale of 1 to 10, with 10 being the highest, respondents were asked to rate their internship experiences in five areas: quality of life, compensation and benefits, interview process, career development, and full-time employment prospects. These ratings were averaged to determine an overall score for each program and develop a Top Ranking.

internship-image

Step 1: Login to your college/universities Vault Access Link.

Step 2: If you are an existing user, please enter your log in credentials under the “Please Log In” section. If you forgot your password or don’t know if you are a current user, click on the “Forgot Password?” link and follow the steps to resetting your account. If this is your first time to Vault, click on the “Create My Vault Account” link to register.

Step 3: Customize your account! We urge you to create a profile to the best of your capability to get viewed by top employers & recruiters, tailor your content, and apply for jobs and more.

Step 4: Get Started Now! Don’t delay, access Vault today. Check with your Career Center / Library for information on best using Vault. Feel free to search additional information such as our Vault Tutorial Video within our Support Center. Happy searching!

Vault

Grad School: To Go or Not to Go?

Courtesy of the National Association of Colleges and Employers

Should you go on to graduate school? Is it the right move for you at this point in your career? Give your decision careful consideration, weighing all the factors, including:

Your career path

What do you truly want to do? What excites you more than anything? If it’s a profession you absolutely, positively must pursue, and it requires advanced education, then you’re probably an excellent candidate for further education.

“You go to graduate school to become an expert in a certain area or to be a professional in certain industries, like law, medicine, or engineering,” explains Cindy Parnell, director of career services at Arizona State University.

Investment of time, money, and energy

Graduate students find out very quickly that their days of frat parties, general education courses, and hanging out with friends are over—graduate school is, well, about school.

Are you ready to commit?

Also consider your post-undergraduate life plans. Are marriage and family in your immediate future? Graduate school can put a huge financial strain on a young couple already facing student loan debt, not to mention the burden of the time you’ll be spending studying. Be sure you—and your family—are ready for the added responsibility of a few more years of schooling.

Your marketability to an employer

Not every profession requires an advanced degree, so do some research on potential career opportunities before committing to more education.

“Students run the risk of thinking today that grad school might be the answer. Depending on the program, you want to have the fieldwork experience as well as grad school. If you go on to grad school without having any fieldwork experience, you run the risk of being over-educated [and under-experienced],” says Shayne Bernstein, associate director, career development services, at Hunter College.

Opportunities within the field

If you do plan to work before going back for that advanced degree, will more education help you move up the ranks at your company? Have you landed a job in your undergraduate area of study, and now you’re thinking you want to enhance what you’ve learned, or pursue a totally new field? Depending on your professional career path, advanced education may help you reach your career goals.

Your motivation

Can’t think of what else to do next? Don’t think of graduate school as a way to hide from the job search. You face wasting a lot of resources.

Bernstein suggests giving careful consideration to your decision to pursue graduate school.

“Don’t go if you’re not passionate about something,” she stresses. “Don’t go for the sake of going to graduate school. Go because you’re passionate and you want to develop your skill set in a certain area.”

 

Fall Job & Internship Fair

It’s that time of year again! The Fall Job and Internship Fair is right around the corner on Wednesday October 1, 2014. Career and job fairs provide candidates with an excellent opportunity to meet employers from a variety of industries and receive first-hand information about the organization and available full-time and internship positions. These fairs allow employers the opportunity to view a large number of potential candidates and promote their organization, which aids in the pre-screening process and gaining familiarity with students at the fair.

So, how do you ensure that you get noticed and land that perfect internship or job? Here are a few simple things that will ensure success:

Update your resume:

A good resume is paramount to the job search. It is the first glance that an employer will get of your background and credentials, so you want it to be neat and tidy. You want to make sure you include your most recent employer and possibly take out any information that may be irrelevant. For help with your resume you can find helpful information on the Career Services website, or you can always schedule an appointment with a Career Services professional. They can guide you step by step; making sure everything is in order and giving you useful suggestions on how you can improve the professional appearance of your resume. Once you have your resume in tip-top shape, you should print copies to hand out to the employers you speak to at the Job Fair.

Dress for success:

It is important to remember that the Job Fair is just like a job interview: you want to make the best first impression possible. Here are a few of the basic tips on professional attire.

Men:

  • Wear nice dress pants that are clean and pressed with a buttoned up shirt and tie.
  • Choose a solid-color button down shirt that is wrinkle-proof.
  • If you can’t afford a suit, purchase a single-breasted, black, two-button blazer that will go with several of your dress pants.
  • Black leather laced shoes are another “must have” that can be worn with a variety of outfits.

Women:

  • If you don’t own a suit, you could wear a skirt (knee length or below) with a sweater set or nice blouse.
  • Avoid heels unless you need the height and are comfortable wearing (and walking!) in them. Remember – closed-toed shoes.
  • Ideally, blouses should not reveal any cleavage or undergarments (bra straps, etc.).

It is important for everyone to remember that jeans and flip-flops are a huge “no” in an employer’s eyes. If you are having trouble figuring out what to wear, always err on the side of caution and go for being over-dressed. Also, be sparing with make-up, perfumes, and colognes. More information can be found on the UW-Green Bay Career Services’ website under “Dress for Success.”

Research:

Once you have finalized your resume and selected your outfit, the final thing you need to complete is your homework! Research the companies that will be at the Job and Internship Fair — learn more about the organizations and the positions that they are offering. This will help you determine who you want to visit with that day. It is a great way to make a good impression and you will be more relaxed knowing you will have something to talk about with the employers. The company representatives will also be impressed that you took the time and effort; just another way to stand out in the crowd! A full list of the employers attending can be found on the Career Services’ website – and if you log into PRO, you can view all of the information submitted by the employers, including information about their organization and the types of positions which they are hiring.

With a little preparation and initiative, you can make a great impression at the Fair. The staff in Career Services hope to see you this coming Wednesday, October 1st!

Top 10 Career Strategies for Freshmen and Sophomores

By Bob Orndorff. Courtesy of the National Association of Colleges and Employers.

You control your career destiny! Just going to class and picking up your diploma after four years doesn’t cut it. You need to become active on and off campus.

Becoming marketable to employers or graduate schools is a four-year job. Here are the top 10 things you can do during college to make yourself marketable at job-search time. In fact, if you do all 10 of these, you’ll be unstoppable:

  1. Keep your grades up—Employers and graduate schools want candidates with good grades. That will probably never change. Doing well academically not only proves that you have a good knowledge base, but indicates a strong work ethic—a trait that employers value.
  2. Identify your interests, skills, values, and personal characteristics—The first step to clarifying your career goals is to go through a process of self-assessment. Visit your career center and take advantage of the self-assessment instruments it has to offer.
  3. Actively explore career options—You owe it to yourself to find a career that enriches your life, not one that brings you down. Actively exploring careers means talking with professionals in occupations of interest and observing professionals on the job. Your career center probably has alumni and other volunteers who are willing to talk to you about their careers. Also, attend any career expos, career fairs, and career speaker panels that are offered.
  4. Become active in extracurricular activities and clubs—Active involvement in activities and clubs on campus is highly valued by employers and graduate schools. Joining a club is fine, but becoming active within that club is what matters most. Become a leader, hold an office, or coordinate an event. You will develop your skills in leadership and teamwork—skills that recruiters covet!
  5. Get involved in community service—It’s important that you begin to understand and appreciate the importance of giving back to your community, and that you live in a larger community than your college or hometown. Typically, students look at community service as a chore. After they’ve served, however, it’s usually one of the most rewarding experiences they’ve had! Recruiters love to see that you’ve volunteered to help in your community.
  6. Develop your computer skills—Take advantage of the computer courses and workshops your college offers. You can also learn a lot by just experimenting with different software packages on your own. Finally, you should learn how to develop your own web page or web-based portfolio. There are many web-design software tools that make it real easy to develop your own web page! Contact your college’s information technology office to see how to get started.
  7. Develop your writing skills—Over and over, company and graduate school recruiters complain about the lack of writing skills among college graduates. Don’t avoid classes that are writing intensive. Work at developing your writing skills. If there is a writing center on campus, have them take a look at your papers from time to time. Remember, the first impression you give to recruiters is typically your cover letter or personal statement.
  8. Complete at least one internship in your chosen career field—More and more, internships are the springboards to employment and getting into graduate programs. Many recruiters say that when they need to fill entry-level jobs, they will only hire previous interns. In addition to making yourself more marketable, internships also are a great way to explore careers and determine whether or not certain careers are for you. When you work for a company as an intern for three to four months, you get a really good feel for whether the field (and company) is one in which you want to work day in and day out!
  9. Gain an appreciation of diversity through study abroad, foreign languages, and courses—We are now, more than ever, working within a global work force. For you to be successful at work and in your life, you must stretch yourself, and learn about people and cultures different than yours. Take advantage of the wonderful study-abroad opportunities and the courses relating to diversity. This is your time to travel! Most people find it harder to take time to travel as they begin their careers and start families.
  10. Use your career center all four years—Your college career center can help you throughout your entire college career. Here is just a sampling of what your career center can help you do:
    • Choose your major and career direction,
    • Explore career options,
    • Obtain an internship,
    • Write a resume and cover letter,
    • Develop your interviewing skills,
    • Identify your skills, interests, and values,
    • Develop a job-search or graduate school plan,
    • Connect you with prospective employers (career fairs, on-campus recruiting, and more), and
    • Connect you with alumni mentors.

Remember, you control your career destiny. Don’t wait until your senior year to start realizing your goals. Your career train is on the move. Jump on board now so you can reach your destination!

 

The 30 Largest Employers in Brown County

Released this month (July 2014) was the list of 30 largest private employers in the Greater Green Bay area.  This report, which is compiled by Advance, the economic development program of the Green Bay Area Chamber of Commerce lists Humana in the number one spot with 3,167 employees, followed by Oneida Tribe of Indians of Wisconsin (2,690 employees) and Schneider (2,580 employees).

The great news for students and graduates of UW-Green Bay is that each employer on the list has some type of connection to UW-Green Bay!  A large majority have listed jobs or internships with Career Services, attended our Job & Internship Fairs,  and/or provided support for programs whether it was volunteering to conduct mock interviews with our students, or speaking at workshops or in classrooms.  Four (4) of the employers have been recipients of Career Services’ Recruitment Partner of the Year award –  WPS (Integrys, 2007), Schreiber (2011), Humana (2012), and Schneider (2013).

See the complete list of 30 Largest Private Employers in the Green Bay Area here.