Children, Language, and Schooling

Dr. Moore will speak in the Christie Theatre on Thursday, April 19th at 5pm

Reflexive Research, Outreach, and Engagement with

Children and Families of the Somali Diaspora

Dr. Moore’s research explores how culture shapes language and literacy development in communities whose members use multiple languages and participate in multiple schooling traditions.  She has published extensively on her ethnographic work with two communities in Cameroon, and is currently working with a Somali community in Ohio who experiences double-schooling.

Leslie Moore earned a doctorate in Applied Linguistics and an MA in Teaching English as a Second Language from UCLA. In between graduate degrees she was a visiting scholar in African Languages & Linguistics at Leiden University. She completed a postdoctoral fellowship in the National Science Foundation Center for Informal Learning and Schools at UC Santa Cruz. Dr. Moore specializes in language socialization research, an ethnographic and interactional discourse analytic approach to the study of human development and learning. Her research has been funded by the National Science Foundation, the Ford Foundation, the Spencer Foundation, and Fulbright, and Dr. Moore has recently completed her work as the Principle Investigator on an Ohio Humanities Council/National Endowment for the Humanities Major Grant for K-12 Education. Her work has appeared in anthropological, linguistic, educational research, and interdisciplinary journals and reference works, including Text & TalkSocial Analysis, Language Arts, Language & CommunicationStudies in African LinguisticsThe Handbook of Language SocializationThe Anthropology of Learning in Childhood, and The Encyclopedia of Language and Education.

Rana Husseini Comes to Town!

We are so excited to welcome award-winning Jordanian journalist Rana Husseini to Green Bay from April 3-13. Ms. Husseini has a full schedule, with speaking engagements on UWGB and St. Norbert’s campuses as well as at venues in the community. Three of the easiest ways to hear her speak are:

Wednesday, April 4, 2:15-3:35 • UW-GB Talk on her book “Murder in the Name of Honor”, Christie Theater

Tuesday, April 10, TBA • Speak at the St. Norbert College Women’s Center

Friday, April 13, 12 – 1:30 • Fox Cities Book Fair, UW-Fox Valley

Rana’s reporting on what she always refers to as “so-called” honor crimes for the Jordan Times was instrumental in breaking the silence and sparking a grassroots movement in that country that successfully reformed the way such crimes are treated under the law.   A powerful and outspoken advocate for human rights, Ms. Husseini also provides valuable insights into the world of Jordanian youth (especially girls’ football).

A Chance to Talk to Leading Anthropologists and Students around the World

Pearson is hosting a FREE online forum February 16 from 9am – 3pm. It is open to all of us. This seems like a pretty cool opportunity for anyone to jump in and have a conversation or just eavesdrop (observe) on the discussions between world-renown anthropologists on a variety of topics. Here is the lineup (you can join for as long or as little a time as you would like):

9:00 Nancy Bonvillain Indigenous Peoples and the World Economy
10:00 Carol Ember Cross-Cultural Variation in Violence
11:00 MyAnthroLab Enganging Cultural Anthropology Students with MyAnthroLab
12:00 Barbara Miller Illness, Healing, and Globalization
1:00 Justin Nolan The Guardianship of Endangered Native American Languages
2:00 Raymond Scupin Ethnicity and Globalization

Learn more at www.pearsonhighered.com/speakingabout/anthropology

Africa Day at Kavarna Coffee House

143 N. Broadway, Green Bay, Wisc. 54303. Tel. (920) 430-3200.
On September 11th, Kavarna Coffeehouse and Ned Dorff will be presenting Africa Day, Exploring a Community’s Connection to a Continent. The idea evolved from the realization that Northeastern Wisconsin is home to an astounding number of non profits that are actively engaged in Africa. As well as presenting food, music, and family activities, Africa Day will feature representatives from many local non-profits, as well as African professors and students who live and work locally. Our goal is to both come to terms with the challenges that Africa faces, to consider the question of responsibility in an increasingly interconnected world, and to take a look at what people can do in one community to improve the health of another half way around the world.
And then, there will be music and dancing. In the evening we will be presenting Mandjou Mara and Tani Diakite, West African Musicians. There will be a suggested donation of $10 for the evening performances to cover costs, anything extra will be given to the non-profit groups that have presented throughout the day.
Join us for a wonderful event! The full schedule will be posted on this page as it develops, whoever in general terms:
9:00 to Noon: Family activities, games, crafts, and fun!
2:00 to 6:00: Presentations, Lectures, and Panels
7:00 to 11:00: Music and Dancing
Questions can be directed to info@kavarna.com.

143 N. Broadway, Green Bay, Wisc. 54303. Tel. (920) 430-3200.
On September 11th, Kavarna Coffeehouse and Ned Dorff will be presenting Africa Day, Exploring a Community’s Connection to a Continent. The idea evolved from the realization that Northeastern Wisconsin is home to an astounding number of non profits that are actively engaged in Africa. As well as presenting food, music, and family activities, Africa Day will feature representatives from many local non-profits, as well as African professors and students who live and work locally. Our goal is to both come to terms with the challenges that Africa faces, to consider the question of responsibility in an increasingly interconnected world, and to take a look at what people can do in one community to improve the health of another half way around the world.
And then, there will be music and dancing. In the evening we will be presenting Mandjou Mara and Tani Diakite, West African Musicians. There will be a suggested donation of $10 for the evening performances to cover costs, anything extra will be given to the non-profit groups that have presented throughout the day.
Join us for a wonderful event! The full schedule will be posted on this page as it develops, whoever in general terms:
9:00 to Noon: Family activities, games, crafts, and fun!
2:00 to 6:00: Presentations, Lectures, and Panels
7:00 to 11:00: Music and Dancing
Questions can be directed to info@kavarna.com.

Free Film This Wednesday!

Sita Sings the Blues

 

September 2, 7 pm.

 

The Neville Museum is hosting the first film in the Green Bay Film Society 2009-2010 film series.  The films will be from all over the world, and all are free.  The Neville is located on the west side of the river at the foot of the Main Street bridge (you don’t need to pay admission to the museum to see the film, but if you go early and do so [$4], among the exhibits are a teapot show including Prof. Emeritus David Damkoehler’s work [among many others] and the Art Annual [including some works by UWGB students and faculty]).

 

Here’s a description of the film:

Sita is a Hindu goddess, the leading lady of India’s epic the Ramayana and a dutiful wife who follows her husband Rama on a 14 year exile to a forest, only to be kidnapped by an evil king from Sri Lanka. Nina (the filmmaker Nina Paley herself) is an artist who finds parallels in Sita’s life when her husband – in India on a work project – decides to break up their marriage and dump her via email. Three hilarious Indonesian shadow puppets narrate both the ancient tragedy and modern comedy in this beautifully animated interpretation of the epic. Paley juxtaposes multiple narrative and visual styles to create a highly entertaining yet moving vision. Musical numbers choreographed to 1920′s jazz vocals of Annette Hanshaw feature a cast of hundreds: flying monkeys, evil monsters, gods, goddesses, warriors, sages, and winged eyeballs. “Sita Sings the Blues” earns its tagline as “The Greatest Break-Up Story Ever Told.”

 

About the Director:

Nina Paley (b. May 3, 1968, Champaign IL, USA) is a longtime veteran of syndicated comic strips, creating “Fluff” (Universal Press Syndicate), “The Hots” (King Features), and her own alternative weekly “Nina’s Adventures.” In 1998 she began making independent animated festival films, including the controversial yet popular environmental short, “The Stork.” In 2002 Nina followed her then-husband to Trivandrum, India, where she read her first Ramayana. This inspired her first feature, “Sita Sings the Blues,” which she animated and produced single-handedly over the course of 5 years on a home computer. Nina teaches at Parsons School of Design in Manhattan and is a 2006 Guggenheim Fellow.

 

Sita Sings the Blues

Directed, written, produced, designed and animated by Nina Paley

82 minutes

Animation

Color, stereo

Digital Cinema Package, HDCAM, DVD; soon on 35mm

2008

http://www.sitasingstheblues.com/press.html

Children And War

As part of both our Common Theme and our team-taught course on War and Peace, we have a special treat tomorrow night – Wednesday, Feb. 25. 

Dr. James Marten, Chair of the History Department at Marquette University will be present with us through the use of telecommunications technology.  Dr. Marten is the influential author and editor of many books including Children in Colonial America: Children and Youth in America, The Boy of Chancellorville and Other Civil War Stories, Childhood and Child Welfare in the Progressive Era & Muckraking, Lessons of War: The Civil War in Childern’s Magazines, The Children’s Civil War and of course the text we are using in the course – Children and War

He will speaking about the book and about his own work on children’s lives during the Civil War.  He’ll be able to provide a historian’s insight on interpreting children’s feelings, thoughts, experiences and behaviors in the past.  It will be an amazing opportunity to ask about different research methodologies.

We are very excited to welcome him and would love to have you join us.  We will be in IS 1034 at 5:15 pm.  Please come along for an interesting evening.

New Website for Multicultural Center

There is a wonderful new resource for everyone interested in learning more about different cultural groups here in Green Bay.  The Multicultural Center of Greater Green Bay has the mission of preserving and sharing diverse cultures, and promoting the full inclusion of individuals of all cultures at all levels of society.

The center is located at 217 N. Madison in Green Bay.  You can check out their new website by clicking here, and there is a permanent link on the links list.

The website has a lot of different kinds of resources; some are about diversity in general, and there are informational materials about specific cultural groups.  There are also links to community resources.  These are lists of organizations and individuals who serve the needs of minority populations. 

This would be a great place to start if you are looking for places for service learning opportunities!

Don’t Forget the Powwow!

This Saturday, April 12th – Kress Events Center – from noon to 10pm

Over 1,000 people are expected this year; you should be one of them!

Schedule of Events

• Noon – Doors open

• 1 p.m. – Grand entry (song and dance with performers in full, traditional regalia)

• 3 p.m. – Ceremony honoring education the First Nations major

• 4 p.m. – Musician Wade Fernandez

• 5 p.m. – Feast (at the neighboring Ecumenical Center provided by M & J’s Traditional Catering)

• 7 p.m. – Second grand entry

• 10 p.m. – Event closes