Organization: Free the Slaves

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Free the Slaves was founded in 2000—and today we are considered a leader and pioneer in the modern abolitionist movement. We have helped awaken the world to the fact that slavery still exists, why it does, and where it’s worst. We’ve developed a global blueprint for change to inform governments, international institutions, faith communities, businesses, and the public what they can do. We’re now implementing our community-based strategy in strategically selected countries, demonstrating that our model works and that it is both scalable and replicable. Our groundbreaking research and rigorous evaluation informs our policy advocacy to strengthen anti-slavery laws and rid slavery from manufacturing supply chains and business practices.

We help communities chart their own path toward sustainable freedom based on their unique needs and circumstances. We strengthen the capacity of grassroots organizations, government agencies, advocacy coalitions, and the media to take action. We support vulnerable communities through education, mobilization, and increasing access to education, vocational training, and essential services. We rescue those in slavery and help them rejoin their families and communities. We record and share success stories so the world can see what both slavery and freedom look like. And we systematically assess our work to ensure accountability and continuously improve our programs. Free the Slaves co-implements all community projects with and through locally-based organizations.

Our model delivers results. Since our founding, we have liberated more than 13,000 people from slavery.

Does Commitment Promote Forgiveness?

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landscape-1454349521-marriage-fightStrong commitment in one’s relationships promotes positive mental events and forgiveness.  This is according to a 2002 study by Finkel and colleagues from Carnegie Mellon University.  They defined commitment as the intent to persist or the decision to remain dependent on the partner. Betrayal, meanwhile, is arguably one of the hardest things to forgive in any relationship. When people are betrayed, they often find it difficult to withdraw from the negative emotions that accompany the act.

Finkel and colleagues conducted three separate studies to explore the relationship between commitment and forgiveness: (1) a priming experiment, (2) a cross-sectional survey study, and (3) an interaction record study. . The authors believed that there would be a positive association between commitment and forgiveness and Study 1 found that individuals, who are highly committed to their partners, are more likely to forgive acts of betrayal. Study 2 and 3 looked at if mental events would bring about the association between commitment and behavior. Study 2 found that highly committed individuals had more positive immediate and delayed behaviors, immediate and delayed cognitive interpretations, and delayed emotional reactions however they had more negative emotional reactions. Study 3 demonstrated that when individuals are highly committed, even in acts of betrayal, they are more likely to look at the act with more positive emotion, cognition, and behavior. They also found that, the association of commitment with forgiveness was significantly affected by both cognitive interpretations and emotional reactions to the betrayal.

Me (2)Mackenzie is a senior majoring in Psychology and minoring in Human Development and Sociology. After graduating from the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay in May 2018, she plans on going to graduate school for Social Work.

 

 

Finkel, E. J., Rusbult, C. E., Kumashiro, M., & Hannon, P. A. (2002). Dealing with betrayal in close relationships: Does commitment promote forgiveness? Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 82(6), 956-974. doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/0022-3514.82.6.956

Organization: The Sexual Assault Center of Family Services

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The Sexual Assault Center of Family Services provides services 24 hours a day, 365 days a year for victims of sexual assault (including sex trafficking), and their families and friends. Services are confidential and free of charge. The Sexual Assault Center provides sensitive services to all victims regardless of their age, gender, race, sexual orientation, or disability. Services are available throughout the Wisconsin counties of Brown, Door, Oconto, and Marinette. Services also include medical advocacy, legal advocacy, follow up services and support.

Links to Relevant Resources

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To create season 2 of All the Rage, we talked with or gathered data from a variety of people and organizations.  Here’s a list of links to relevant resources related to human trafficking.

Organization: Ending the Game

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Ending The Game (ETG) is a groundbreaking survivor-written curriculum that helps sex trafficking victims reduce feelings of attachment to a trafficker and/or the trafficking lifestyle.  Ending The Game (ETG) educates and empowers sex trafficking victims by providing a structure and framework to uncover harmful psychological coercion (a.k.a. “The Game”) that victims may have been subjected to during their trafficking experience. By offering a curriculum that reveals the sequence of commonly-used, yet seldom-explained, mind control techniques used by traffickers, we aim to empower participants to acquire skills to “End The Game.”

Organization: Brown County Sheriff’s Office

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The Brown County Sheriff’s Office is the oldest Sheriff’s Office in the state of Wisconsin and was established in 1818. The Sheriff’s Office services 13 townships and 5 Villages in the County. The Sheriff’s Office employs approximately 160 sworn Deputies and approximately 160 non-sworn personnel.  The Human Trafficking Task Force is made up of Investigators from the Brown County Sheriff’s Office, Green Bay Police Department, De Pere Police Department and Ashwaubenon Public Safety. We are assisted by the Wisconsin Department of Justice – Division of Criminal Investigation and the Federal Bureau of Investigation.

Organization: Verité

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Verité is a global, independent, non-profit organization that conducts research, advocacy, consulting, training’s, and assessments with a vision that people worldwide work under safe, fair, and legal conditions.

Since our inception in 1995, we have partnered with hundreds of multinational brands, suppliers, and international institutions in more than 70 countries across multiple sectors to improve working conditions and social performance within global supply chains. Through our independent regional offices and long-term network partners, we gather information globally about labor practices and make this analysis available to brands, suppliers, and investors, as well as governments, NGOs, and trade unions.