Psychology Today: Five Ways to Deal with Anger

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In a previous post, I wrote about why people get angry. There’s a fairly predictable pattern based on your mood, the provocation, and your interpretation of that provocation (which is influenced by your mood). What follows all that is the anger response which can look a lot of different ways (anything from suppression to appropriate assertion to violence).

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Psychology Today: Five Fascinating Findings About Anger

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Anger is everywhere.  It influences our behavior in ways we can’t possible imagine.  Here are five examples.

1. People Really Do Associate Anger with the Color Red

According to a 2013 study published in Emotion (Young et al., 2013), the expression “seeing red” isn’t just a metaphor.

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Psychology Today: Opportunities to Feel

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tumblr_m1p3j9qln51qa5woeThis morning, before I had my first sip of coffee, I had learned the following: (1) my friends’ daughter was sick, (2) another friend, more distant, was pregnant, and (3) that legislators in my state have been embracing all sorts of policies I find harmful. That’s right, within ten minutes of waking up, Facebook had provided me with opportunities to feel sadness, joy, and anger. Contrast that with ten years ago, pre-Facebook, when I would have spent that time… staring out the window, probably. Honestly, what did I do while waiting for my coffee to brew before I had Facebook?

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Psychology Today: Anger Over Elections. Breaking it Down

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I’m often asked if there is more anger over politics than there used to be. Truthfully, it’s hard to say since there aren’t really any formal means of assessing such a thing.

My best guess, though, is that there probably is not. My best guess is that the anger is more visible to people now so it seems like there’s more. We can easily capture video examples of anger and aggression at campaign rallies and post those videos on the Internet for all to see.

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Psychology Today: Avoiding the Online Anger Trap

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This morning, I noticed what I thought was an offensive post from a Facebook friend that I badly wanted to respond to. Fortunately, I didn’t have time to respond right then so I made a mental note to get back to it later and went about my morning. I was still sort of fuming about it, though, and thinking through all of the different things I wanted to write in response. I admit some of them were a bit cruel.

Read at Psychology Today