Season 2, Episode 6: Attack the System

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In the final episode of season 2 of All the Rage, we talk about how to eradicate human trafficking at the international, national, statewide, and local level. More specifically, we talk about what you can do to help end modern day slavery. Guests include Stephanie Richard (Coalition to Abolish Slavery and Trafficking), Shawn MacDonald (Verite), and Terry FitzPatrick (Free the Slaves).

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Media’s Influence on One’s Perception of Violence and Mental Illness

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1682602_1280x720Both news and entertainment media show people with mental illness as dangerous, violent, or unpredictable. Many of the individuals who commit these crimes are presumed to have a mental illness and this in turn perpetuates the social stigma that all people with a mental illness are violent or dangerous. Before some of the most recent and deadly mass shootings including the 2016 Pulse Nightclub shooting in Orlando, the 2017 Las Vegas shooting at am outdoor concert, and the 2017 First Baptist Church shooting in Texas, The Virginia Tech shootings was one of the deadliest shootings to date. Taking place in 2007 and ending with 32 dead and 15 wounded, the shooter was perceived to have had a mental illness that caused him to commit this crime.

Hoffner and colleagues conducted a study that examined the perceived influence of news coverage of the Virginia Tech shootings on one’s own and others’ attitudes about mental illness, and behavioral outcomes as a function of personal experience with mental illness. They utilized an online survey of 198 adults within about one month of the shootings. Individuals without a mental illness, the perceived news influence on their own attitudes toward mental illness was associated with more engagement in support/comfort activities and greater likelihood of online opinion expression. In contrast, individuals with a mental illness, perceiving that others attitudes had become more negative was associated with less engagement in support/comfort activities. Respondents with no experience of mental illness reported greater stereotypes about mental illness and less willingness to seek treatment and they expressed more fear and less anger than those who had experience with mental illness.

Me (2)Mackenzie is a senior majoring in Psychology and minoring in Human Development and Sociology. After graduating from the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay in May 2018, she plans on going to graduate school for Social Work.

 

 

Hoffner, C. A., Fujioka, Y., Cohen, E. L., & Atwell Seate, A. (2017). Perceived media influence, mental illness, and responses to news coverage of a mass shooting. Psychology of Popular Media Culture, 6(2), 159-173. doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/ppm0000093

Season 2, Episode 5: A Topic that Gets a Reaction Out of People

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In this fifth episode of season 2 of All the Rage, we talk human trafficking in popular culture with Dr. Bryan Carr, host of Serious Fun. From Taken to The Punisher to The Girl Who Played with Fire, we discuss the various ways modern day slavery has found its way into the popular culture and how these depictions influence the public.

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Guest: Bryan Carr

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Bryan-CarrBryan Carr is an assistant professor in the Communication and Information Science departments at the University of Wisconsin – Green Bay, where he teaches courses in the mass media and game studies emphases. His work focuses on popular culture, particularly in terms of identity representation and negotiation in superhero comics, video games, and sports. His work on these subjects has been published in the Journal of Entertainment and Media Studies and the Southwest Mass Communication Journal, as well as in edited volumes like Parasocial Politics, Re/Framing Identifications, The 100 Greatest Video Games, and From Jack Johnson to LeBron James: Sports, Media, and the Color Line.

Featured in Episode 5.

Guest: Matt Wilson

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Matt Wilson Matthew Wilson is a Sergeant Investigator for the Brown County Sheriff’s Office. Matthew was hired in 2006 and has worked in the Patrol Division, Court Security and the multijurisdictional Drug Task Force before being promoted to his new position in January, 2017. Matthew’s current assignment is to investigate human trafficking as well assist with Internet Crimes Against Children (ICAC).

Featured in Episode 4.

Guest: Austin Choi-Fitzpatrick

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downloadAustin Choi-Fitzpatrick is a writer and professor at the Kroc School of Peace Studies at the University of San Diego. He is the author of What Slaveholders Think: How Contemporary Perpetrators Rationalize What They Do (2017) and co-editor of From Human Trafficking to Human Rights (2012). His newest book Protest Tech: How Social Movements Use Disruptive Technology, explores the ways movements use tools and technologies to bring social change. Shorter work has appeared in Slate, Al Jazeera, the Guardian, Huffington Post, and Aeon (as well as in academic journals most people have never heard of).

Featured in Episode 4

Guest: Carolyn Lumpkin

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_W4A3730 (2)Carolyn Lumpkin, LCSW is the Director of Empowerment Programs at the Coalition to Abolish Slavery and Trafficking (CAST), overseeing the Social Services Programs (Cast Management, Emergency Response, Youth Program, Shelter Program) and Survivor Leadership Programs (Survivor Caucus and National Survivor Network). In 2004, Carolyn was previously with CAST as a Case Manager and Shelter Night Manager, and later returned in 2016 to continue her work at CAST, now as the Director of Empowerment Programs. Prior to returning to CAST, Carolyn was the Clinical Program Manager of the Wraparound Program with Children’s Institute, Inc. in South Los Angeles. Carolyn has over 16 years of experience working with diverse populations, in both direct service and management roles. She has extensive experience providing trauma-informed mental health services in communities with high rates of poverty, crime, and violence. In addition, Carolyn implemented an integrated treatment model for adolescents with substance abuse and trauma histories in the South Los Angeles area, and has utilized multiple evidence-based treatment practices in her clinical work. Carolyn is also a trainer in vicarious trauma and compassion fatigue. Carolyn received a B.A. in Psychology from the University of California, Berkeley and a Masters in Social Work degree from California State University, Long Beach. Carolyn is a Licensed Clinical Social Worker in the State of California.

CAST Hotline #: 888-539-2373 (exclusively for LA)

National Human Trafficking Hotline: 1-888-373-7888

Featured in Episode 3

 

Organization: Free the Slaves

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Free the Slaves was founded in 2000—and today we are considered a leader and pioneer in the modern abolitionist movement. We have helped awaken the world to the fact that slavery still exists, why it does, and where it’s worst. We’ve developed a global blueprint for change to inform governments, international institutions, faith communities, businesses, and the public what they can do. We’re now implementing our community-based strategy in strategically selected countries, demonstrating that our model works and that it is both scalable and replicable. Our groundbreaking research and rigorous evaluation informs our policy advocacy to strengthen anti-slavery laws and rid slavery from manufacturing supply chains and business practices.

We help communities chart their own path toward sustainable freedom based on their unique needs and circumstances. We strengthen the capacity of grassroots organizations, government agencies, advocacy coalitions, and the media to take action. We support vulnerable communities through education, mobilization, and increasing access to education, vocational training, and essential services. We rescue those in slavery and help them rejoin their families and communities. We record and share success stories so the world can see what both slavery and freedom look like. And we systematically assess our work to ensure accountability and continuously improve our programs. Free the Slaves co-implements all community projects with and through locally-based organizations.

Our model delivers results. Since our founding, we have liberated more than 13,000 people from slavery.

Guest: Terry FitzPatrick

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Terry FitzPatrick (1) thumbnail

Terry FitzPatrick is the Free the Slaves Communications and Advocacy Director and is an award-winning journalist and media development expert who uses his reporting skills to expose slavery and showcase anti-slavery solutions, his experience covering government & politics to conduct anti-trafficking policy advocacy, and his communications training skills to help activists bring slavery to an end. FitzPatrick has covered a wide range of topics for NPR, PBS, BBC, VOA, The Dallas Morning News and The Texas Observer, including economic development, global health, environmental protection, criminal justice and human rights. He has produced documentaries for the Discovery Channel and History Channel, and short films on modern slavery in 12 countries. FitzPatrick has directed media skills training projects in 17 countries. He serves as the communications and advocacy strategist, chief writer, media relations officer and spokesperson for Free the Slaves. He majored in broadcast journalism at the University of Wisconsin – Madison.